Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    322581

    Implementing the UN learning strategy on HIV / AIDS: sixteen case studies.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007 Mar. 97 p. (UNAIDS/07.08E; JC1311E)

    In April 2003, the Committee of Cosponsoring Organizations of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) approved a Learning Strategy to help UN system staff develop competence on HIV and AIDS. The goals of the Learning Strategy are: to develop the knowledge and competence of the UN and its staff so that they are able to best support national responses to HIV and AIDS; and to ensure that all UN staff members are able to make informed decisions to protect themselves from HIV and, if they are infected or affected by HIV, to ensure that they know where to turn for the best possible care and treatment. This includes ensuring that staff members fully understand the UN's HIV and AIDS workplace policies and how they are implemented. To support UN country teams to implement the Learning Strategy, Learning Facilitators were selected at country level and trained in a series of regional workshops. The Learning Facilitators were then expected to ensure - along with the country teams-that the standards of the Learning Strategy were realized. This report is comprised of UN HIV/AIDS Learning Strategy case studies from sixteen countries: Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, India, Indonesia, Macedonia, Madagascar, Morocco, Nigeria, the Pan American Health Organization headquarters (United States), Pakistan, Paraguay, Vienna (Austria), Viet Nam, and Yemen. It presents each country's unique experience in implementing the strategy since its adoption in 2003. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    136422

    Sanitation in emergency situations. Proceedings of an international workshop, held in Oxford, December 1995.

    Adams J

    Oxford, England, Oxfam, 1996. 51 p. (Oxfam Working Paper)

    This report presents summaries of plenaries, workshop papers, working group discussions, and a complete list of recommendations from the December 1995 International Inter-Agency Workshop on Sanitation in Emergency Situations. The 45 participants included delegates from nongovernmental organizations, UN organizations, the Red Cross, and independent sanitation workers. The aim was to discuss organizational and technical problems and to agree on operating principles, program implementation, and recommendations. The workshop papers focused on: principles for better sanitation, excreta disposal kits, first-phase excreta disposal, latrine construction, excreta disposal on difficult sites, emergency solid waste management/disposal, vector control, personal hygiene and water collection-storage, drainage and washing-bathing facilities, sanitation in enclosed centers, environmental impact, community participation, staff training, and evaluations. The discussions addressed topics on the principles for sanitation promotion in emergencies, first-phase excreta disposal, second phase and longer excreta disposal, off-site/on-site excreta disposal, flow charts for emergency excreta disposal for many specific conditions, refuse disposal, hygiene education, personal hygiene kits, vector control, hygiene facilities, environmental impact, sanitation in enclosed centers, and staff training. Priority should be given to sanitation techniques and guidelines for improving practices; initial assessments of emergency situations; and sanitation. Improvements are needed in information exchanges, community participation, and staff training. Five other recommendations are discussed.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    107443

    Experts and NGOs discuss the implementation of the Dakar / Ngor Declaration and the Cairo Programme of Action in Abidjan.

    AFRICAN POPULATION NEWSLETTER. 1995 Jan-Jun; (67):1.

    An Experts and Nongovernmental Organizations (NGOs) Workshop on the implementation of the Dakar/Ngor Declaration (DND) and the Cairo Programme of Action (ICPD-PA) was organized in Abidjan, Ivory Coast, June 6-9, 1995 by the Joint ECA/OAU/ADB Secretariat with the financial support of the governments of France and the Netherlands, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), and the African Development Bank. Goals of the Workshop included the following: 1) to evolve a methodology for monitoring and evaluating the implementation of the DND and the ICPD-PA; 2) to define the role of the NGOs in the conceptualization, implementation, and monitoring of policies and programs derived from the DND and the ICPD-PA; 3) to create a network of major NGOs working in the area of population and development in the ECA region; and 4) to define IEC strategies to publicize the recommendations in the DND and the ICPD-PA. 26 experts, and representatives of 28 NGOs, several international and research institutions, UNFPA, and IPPF attended the Workshop. Sessions focused on the following themes: 1) Implementation of the Kilimanjaro Programme of Action at the regional level; 2) National experiences in the implementation of the DND and the ICPD-PA; 3) Framework of monitoring and evaluating the implementation of DND and the ICPD-PA; 4) African Population Commission and the implementation of DND and the ICPD-PA; 5) ADB experience in the field of population programs and projects; and 6) the role of NGOs in the implementation of the DND and the ICPD-PA. The recommendations of the Workshop, which will affect ECA member states, will be disseminated in the second half of 1995.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    081879

    Male participation in family planning: a review of programme approaches in Africa.

    Hawkins K

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 1992 Sep. 93 p.

    20 participants from 9 sub-Saharan countries and the UK discuss men's negative attitudes towards family planning (the leading obstacle to the success of family planning in Africa) at the November 1991 Workshop on Male Participation in Family Planning in The Gambia. Family planning programs have targeted women for 20 years, but they are starting to see the men's role in making fertility decisions and in transmitting sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). They are trying to find ways to increase men's involvement in promoting family planning and STD prevention. Some recent research in Africa shows that many men already have a positive attitude towards family planning, but there is poor or no positive communication between husband and wife about fertility and sexuality. Some family planning programs (e.g., those in Sierra Leone, Nigeria, Ethiopia, and Zimbabwe) use information, education, and communication (IEC) activities (e.g., audiovisual material, print media, film, workshops, seminars, and songs) to promote men's sexual responsibility. IEC programs do increase knowledge, but do not necessarily change attitudes and practice. Some research indicates that awareness raising must be followed by counseling and peer promotion efforts to effect attitudinal and behavioral change. The sub-Saharan Africa programs must conduct baseline research on attitudes and a needs assessment to determine how to address men's needs. In Zambia, baseline research reveals that a man having 1 faithful partner for a lifetime is deemed negative. Common effective needs assessment methodologies are focus group discussions and individual interviews. Programs have identified various service delivery strategies to meet these needs. They are integration of family planning promotion efforts via AIDS prevention programs, income-generating schemes, employment-based programs, youth programs and peer counseling, male-to-male community-based distribution of condoms, and social marketing. Few programs have been evaluated, mainly because evaluation is not included in the planning process.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    072416

    Report. Seminar on Maternal and Child Health / Family Planning Programme Management, convened by the Regional Office for the Western Pacific of the World Health Organization, Nadi, Fiji, 29 April - 10 May 1991.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Western Pacific

    Manila, Philippines, WHO, Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 1991 Jul. [3], 67 p. (Report Series No. RS/91/GE/08(FIJ); (WP)MCH/ICP/MCH/001-E)

    12 national coordinators of UNFPA funded maternal and child health/family planning projects attended the Seminar on Maternal and Child Health/Family Planning Programme Management in Nadi, Fiji between April 19-May 10, 1991. The Regional Office for the Western Pacific of Who organized the seminar. Participants came from Cook Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, Fiji, Kiribati, Papua New Guinea, Republic or Marshall Islands, Republic of Palua, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, and Vanuatu. Seminar leaders concentrated on having participants use the UNFPA project formulation guidelines and evaluation procedures. Participants learned about project formulation, target setting, project management (personnel, time, and logistics), management information systems (MIS), and project strategies especially community participation. At the end of the seminar, they applied their new knowledge and skills in developing workable country plans of action. Resource personnel helped each participant with preparing the country plans. Overall the participants considered the seminar to have been a success. Yet, even though UNFPA laid out the guidelines logically, participants found them to be complex and difficult to understand. They also expressed the need for training after the seminar to make it more effective. Participants acknowledged the importance of MIS and that MIS must be developed further in participating countries. Further they mentioned the value of community based data in effectively managing projects. A sample country plan of the Federated States of Micronesia and the Kingdom of Tonga follows the report.
    Add to my documents.