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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    157631

    Report on the launching of National Plan of Action for Elimination of Female Genital Mutilation workshop.

    Kenya. Ministry of Health

    [Nairobi], Kenya, Ministry of Health, 1999 Nov. 19 p.

    This paper discusses female genital mutilation (FGM), which was addressed at the 1994 Cairo International Conference on Population and Development. Research studies have shown the nature and extent of FGM. The three types of circumcision (type I, clitoridectomy; type II, excision; type III, infibulation) are widely practiced by various Kenyan tribes, with each tribe perpetuating a particular type. In view of this, Kenya has identified FGM as one of the harmful traditional practices that have to be eliminated. In response, the Health Ministers from the African Region passed a number of resolutions calling on the member states where FGM is practiced. Moreover, in order to achieve the resolutions, the UN Development Program/UN Children's Fund Kenya offices held various meetings whose members were drawn from nongovernmental organizations and government ministries. The mission of these meetings was to establish committees that would coordinate the efforts of eliminating the FGM practice; hence the core group, consisting of 40 members, was established. The Ministry of Health, a member of the Core Team spearheaded the development of the National Action Plan for Elimination of Female Genital Mutilation. To facilitate the activity, Ministry of Health approached the WHO for financial and technical assistance.
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  2. 2
    144017

    Report of the Working Group on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children.

    Warzazi HE

    [Unpublished] 1986 Feb 4. Prepared for United Nations Commission on Human Rights, Forty-second session, 3 February - 14 March 1986. Item 19 of the provisional agenda. (E/CN.4/1986/42)

    The results of the working group on traditional practices affecting the health of women and children as presented during the 42nd session of the UN Commission on Human Rights are reported. Among the various traditional practices identified was the problem of female circumcision. Several aspects of female circumcision were explored; namely, the definition of female circumcision, forms of female circumcision and the age at which it is carried out, origins and scope of the phenomenon, evolution of the problem, countries practicing female circumcision and reasons for the practice, effects on physical and mental health of women and children, and measures undertaken for the eradication of female circumcision at the regional, national and international levels. Conclusions that were drawn from available data and the recommended actions to abolish female circumcision are presented.
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  3. 3
    135865

    Training for advocacy. Report of the Inter-Regional Advocacy Training Workshop held in Nairobi in March 1996.

    Hawkins C

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 1996. 16, [2] p.

    This document reports on the Inter-regional Advocacy Training Workshop held by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) in Nairobi, Kenya in 1996. The purpose of the workshop was to train trainers in the advocacy skills needed to advocate for the IPPF's "Vision 2000" goals. Specific objectives of the workshop included drafting an advocacy plan of action, identifying training needs and support, replicating the training project, and exchanging experiences. The report opens with background information explaining why advocacy is important to the IPPF and an introduction to the workshop. The report then covers the skills of clarifying advocacy, reaching consensus in the organization, coalition building, making the most of the mass media, and dealing with the opposition. Next, the report presents a case study of the successful work of the Kenyan Family Planning Association (FPA) in advocating eradication of female genital mutilation. The report continues by discussing the skills of organizing political lobbying, mobilizing resources, evaluating advocacy, and drafting strategic advocacy plans. The report ends by recommending that 1) FPAs receive specific training to embark on advocacy programs, 2) a training module be developed, 3) the IPPF's Advocacy Guide include definitions of advocacy concepts, 4) the IPPF adopt clear and uniform definitions of concepts throughout all of its documents, 5) workshops allow for close interaction with the participants' objectives, 6) advocacy materials be pretested, and 7) regular exchanges of experiences be arranged.
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  4. 4
    130394

    Highlights from the Third Annual Inter-Agency Working Group on FGM Meeting, Cairo, Egypt, November, 1996.

    Research, Action and Information Network for Bodily Integrity of Women [RAINBO]

    [Unpublished] 1996. 13 p.

    In November 1996, more than 34 representatives from 20 organizations attended the Third Annual Inter-Agency Working Group meeting on female genital mutilation (FGM) in Cairo, Egypt. After opening remarks by the Chairperson of the Task Force on FGM in Egypt and the Egyptian Under Secretary of the Ministry of Health and Population, other discussions placed FGM in the larger context of women's human rights, reviewed the background of the Global Action Against FGM Project and the goals of the Inter-Agency Working Group, and provided an overview of the activities of RAINBO (Research, Action, and Information Network for Bodily Integrity of Women). A report was then given of a research workshop organized by RAINBO and the Egyptian Task Force on FGM immediately prior to the Working Group meeting. It was noted that data from the recent Demographic and Health Survey revealed an FGM prevalence rate of 97% in Egypt, and areas requiring more research were highlighted. Discussion following this presentation included mention of qualitative methods used in a recent study in Sierra Leone and recent research in the Sudan that led to recommended intervention strategies. During the second day of the Working Group meeting, participants provided a preview of the work of the Egyptian Task Force Against FGM; a description of RAINBO's effort to develop training of trainers reproductive health and FGM materials; and summaries of the work of nongovernmental organizations, private foundations, UN agencies, and bilateral donors. This meeting report ends with a list of participants.
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  5. 5
    128678

    Lessons learned: providing communication technical assistance in FGM programs.

    Corso C

    [Unpublished] [1996]. [2] p.

    This document relays 10 lessons learned in providing communication technical assistance in programs designed to eradicate female genital mutilation (FGM). 1) The community must identify FGM as an issue they are interested in working on, and the local implementing agency must request technical assistance. 2) Agencies providing technical assistance to FGM eradication programs must avoid high visibility. 3) Technical assistance is most appropriately given by local staff living and working in the particular country. 4) International agencies should strengthen the skill base of their local counterparts so the local groups can acquire the necessary communication skills to work toward eradication. 5) The local implementing organization must conduct research to guide the intervention and the target communities must be involved in designing the interventions. 6) Interventions must be very local in nature and design. 7) Workshops provide good settings for providing technical assistance and training. 8) Local-level project staff need assistance in skills training and individual-level support to deal with their sense that they are betraying their own culture. 9) Skills training helps local staff work through individual behavior change issues in order to help communities adopt behavior changes. 10) The process of behavior change takes time and requires continuity. Donors and local implementing agencies must understand that it may take as long as a generation to eradicate FGM.
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  6. 6
    121729

    Report of the Technical consultation on Female Genital Mutilation, 27-29 March 1996, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1996. 36 p.

    This report presents a summary of the discourse among 58 participants from 25 countries, international nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), UN agencies, and African organizations, who attended the Technical Consultation on Female Genital Mutilation during March 1996 in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The meeting was sponsored and organized by the UNFPA. About 85-115 million girls and women have undergone female genital mutilation (FGM), and at least 2 million are at risk. Reproductive and sexual health are affected over the entire life course by FGM. Despite the seriousness of the issue, there are major gaps in knowledge about the extent of the problem and the nature of successful interventions. Expressed concern has not reached the level of legal change or programs for promoting the abandonment of the practice. Dr. Leila Mehra reviewed the main features of FGM, UN policies, and the implications for operations research. Dr. Nahid Toubia gave an assessment of approaches to FGM from a reproductive health, human rights, and historical perspective. The World Health Organization Working Group emphasized the importance of including all physical, psychological, and human rights aspects of FGM in the definition. Dr. Mehra indicated that circumcisers, government policymakers, and NGOs should be targeted. Country-specific presentations focused on Ghana, Burkina Faso, Kenya, Sudan, Uganda, Senegal, and Ethiopia. Participants generally agreed that circumcisers need alternative sources of income and that resistance is widespread. Parents need to be educated. Communities need sex education. Men's and women's groups need to be mobilized to stop FGM. Ms. Ana Angarita proposed a model of the determinants of FGM and potential areas for intervention and summarized the initiatives taken and constraints. Dr. Hamid Rushwan proposed a framework for integrating FGM eradication into three UNFPA program areas.
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