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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    337116

    Road-mapping a total market approach: Eastern Europe and Central Asia Workshops.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; PATH

    Seattle, Washington, PATH, 2013 Apr. [24] p.

    To meet the challenge of sustaining reproductive health commodity security in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the United Nations Population Fund and PATH developed workshops to increase awareness about total market approaches and develop an action plan for the region. This report describes two regional workshops that were held in April 2013.
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  2. 2
    327448

    Strengthening the Education Sector Response to HIV and AIDS in the Caribbean. UNESCO / WB partnership in support of CARICOM strategy in education and HIV and AIDS.

    Bundy DA; Fontani P; Ruiz Devesa D; O'Connell TE; Babb J

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2007 Dec 14. 29 p.

    This report presents the findings and outcomes of the three joint UNESCO/WB missions to Guyana, Jamaica and St. Lucia, and elaborates on next steps identified for action at both national and regional levels. The report also sets these findings and next steps within the broader context of the Caribbean plan for action and presents in its appendices, sample resources to guide the development of a comprehensive response to HIV & AIDS by the education sector.
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  3. 3
    312465

    The Maputo report. WHO support to countries for scaling up essential interventions towards universal coverage in Africa.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for Africa

    Brazzaville, Congo, WHO, 2006. 33 p. (WHO/CCO/06.02)

    The African region accounts for 10% of the world's population yet is confronted with 20% of the global burden of disease. African nations are faced with high levels of poverty, with 39% of the population below the poverty line; and slow economic growth, with annual per capita expenditure on health in most countries limited to between US$ 10 and US$ 29. Other well-documented challenges to the region include limited financial and human resources, uncoordinated and inconsistent policy action on the determinants of health, limited use of knowledge and evidence to inform policies, and frequent occurrences of natural and man-made disasters. Although much has happened, WHO requires radical new approaches for how it does business in the region. The 21st century presents extensive opportunities for improving health in the region -- building on the momentum of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), resolutions of the WHO World Health Assembly (WHA) and the Regional Committee, coordinated work of the African Union, and the strategic framework of the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD) -- offering opportunities for the mobilization of political, technical and other resources for the region. In addition to health investments from national, bilateral and multilateral sources, commitments are being crystallized in distinct initiatives such as the Millennium Challenge Account, the Presidential Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR), the Report on the Commission for Africa, the Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM), and the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunizations (GAVI). These initiatives come at a time when international agreements such as the Paris Declaration reaffirm the importance of countries taking the lead in their own health agendas in regards to international development assistance. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    181292

    Public-private partnerships for public health.

    Reich MR

    Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies, 2002 Apr. ix, 205 p. (Harvard Series on Population and International Health)

    This book presents the results of the workshop. The essays in this volume offer some fresh perspectives on partnerships, probe some troubling questions, and provide empirical evidence of both benefits and challenges of public-private partnerships. The participants in the meeting also achieved some progress in creating a shared vocabulary, or at least shared understanding, on points of contention, suggesting that dialogue among partisans in public health can help move debates about critical issues forward. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    158863

    InterAction Forum 2001 -- effectiveness through accountability. Workshop highlighted the challenges and opportunities to mutual accountability in development relationships.

    Monday Developments. 2001 Jul 9; 19(12):4-5.

    As part of the Committee on Development Policy and Practice session series on mutual accountability, the InterAction's Africa Liaison Program Initiative held a workshop featuring case studies from Africa. The topic focuses on "Moving Towards Mutual Accountability: Striking a Balance on Accountability Among Donors, Practitioners, and End Users." The session aimed to expand understanding of the challenges and opportunities surrounding mutual accountability in African development relationships; to allow policy-makers to be exposed to field practices; and to establish a foundation for networking and continuous dialogue among participants following the session. Moderated by Cherri Waters, Vice-President at Lutheran World Relief, the session consisted of one case study from West Africa and one from East and Southern Africa. The first case study focused on a partnership between the Association for the Promotion of Senegalese Women and Oxfam America in Senegal. While the second case study consisted of a sub-contractual relationship between the US Agency for International Development, Pact and Mwelekeo Wa Nongovernmental Organization. It is noted that the session proved to be stimulating and thought provoking and raised challenging issues surrounding mutual accountability in development relationships.
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  6. 6
    073671

    Selected UNFPA-funded projects executed by the WHO/South East Asian regional office (SEARO).

    Sobrevilla L; Deville W; Reddy N

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [1992]. v, 69, [2] p. (Evaluation Report)

    In 1991, a mission in India, Bhutan and Nepal evaluated UNFPA/WHO South East Asian Regional Office (SEARO) maternal and child health/family planning (MCH/FP) projects. The Regional Advisory Team in MCH/FP Project (RT) placed more emphasis on the MCH component than the FP component. It included all priority areas identified in 1984, but did not include management until 1988. In fact, it delayed recruiting a technical officer and recruited someone who was unqualified and who performed poorly. SEARO improved cooperation between RT and community health units and named the team leader as regional adviser for family health. The RT team did not promote itself very well, however, Member countries and UNFPA did request technical assistance from RT for MCH/FP projects, especially operations research. RT also set up fruitful intercountry workshops. The team did not put much effort in training, adolescent health, and transfer of technology, though. Further RT project management was still weak. Overall SEARO had been able to follow the policies of governments, but often its advisors did not follow UNFPA guidelines when helping countries plan the design and strategy of country projects. Delays in approval were common in all the projects reviewed by the mission. Furthermore previous evaluations also identified this weakness. In addition, a project in Bhutan addressed mothers' concerns but ignored other women's roles such as managers of households and wage earners. Besides, little was done to include women's participation in health sector decision making at the basic health unit and at the central health ministry. In Nepal, institution building did not include advancement for women or encourage proactive role roles of qualified women medical professionals. In Bhutan, but not Nepal, fellowships and study tours helped increase the number of trained personnel attending intercountry activities.
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