Your search found 201 Results

  1. 1
    374572

    Reporting on gender-based violence in the Syria crisis: facilitator’s guide.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2016 Apr. 78 p.

    This training manual enables a journalist or other trainer to conduct a two- or three-day training workshop. The first part of the curriculum begins with training and group discussion about basic concepts and principles that will help participants develop a clear understanding of the meaning of the term ‘gender-based violence’. The programme continues with detailed information about the consequences of gender-based violence and the survivor support services needed. The trainer will also cover the causes and contributing factors, shining a light on prevention and how best to develop effective prevention strategies. The second part of the curriculum focuses on the ethical principles of reporting on gender-based violence, including what to do and what to avoid. It also includes tips for the journalists to consider during interviews and when to report on gender-based violence related issues.
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  2. 2
    340079
    Peer Reviewed

    The Botswana Medical Eligibility Criteria Wheel: Adapting a tool to meet the needs of Botswana's family planning program.

    Kim CR; Kidula N; Rammipi MK; Mokganya L; Gaffield ML

    African Journal of Reproductive Health. 2016 Jun; 20(2):9-12.

    In efforts to strive for family planning repositioning in Botswana, the Ministry of Health convened a meeting to undertake an adaptation of the Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use (MEC) wheel. The main objectives of this process were to present technical updates of the various contraceptive methods, to update the current medical conditions prevalent to Botswana and to adapt the MEC wheel to meet the needs of the Botswanian people. This commentary focuses on the adaptation process that occurred during the week-long stakeholder workshop. It concludes with the key elements learned from this process that can potentially inform countries who are interested in undergoing a similar exercise to strengthen their family planning needs.
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  3. 3
    372997

    Being a woman in Côte d'Ivoire: empowerment challenges.

    Kraidy AA; Noubissié EN; Sid’Ahmed TO

    Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, World Bank, 2013 Jun. 19 p.

    In Africa, women are subjected to discriminatory practices that keep them in a vulnerable situation. Their limited access to land, in a continent where the majority of the population depends on agriculture, reduces their access to credit and their capacity to undertake sustainable economic activities to generate income. They hold only 18 percent of agricultural lands and are not better off in administrations. In Cote d'Ivoire, the woman remains marginalized, with a status that is increasingly weakened today by the socio-political situation. Data from the National Statistics Institute highlight their extreme poverty: 75 percent of rural women are living below the poverty line. And they are often deprived of basic social services. Some socio-cultural factors perpetuate traditions that are harmful to girls and women. This report is the culmination of the process initiated by the World Bank as part of the establishment of its program of strengthening the role of women in Ivorian society. It reports summary proposals from the various consultations held both nationally and regionally. Designed in a participatory and decentralized approach, these consultations have made it possible to gather factual and contextual data on the four (04) themes selected for the workshops, as well as proposals that, if translated into actions, would help develop an action plan. This is, and it must be stressed, a study that has the merit of giving the floor directly to hundreds of Ivorian women from all socio-professional categories to develop themselves a roadmap based on their own daily experiences.
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  4. 4
    372502

    Engaging men and boys in refugee settings to address sexual and gender based violence.

    Aasheim C; Buscher D; Peacock D; Ngugi L

    Johannesburg, South Africa, Sonke Gender Justice Network, [2008]. 26 p.

    UNHCR has recognized the essential role that both male staff and male persons of concern play in ending gender-based violence in its operations and that protecting women from SGBV is part of the organization’s core protection mandate. This workshop was organized to raise awareness of the need to engage men and boys, to look at successful models for such engagement, and to develop country-level strategies for strengthening the engagement of men and boys to end sexual and gender-based violence. The workshop addressed knowledge, attitudes and action and brought together UNHCR and implementing partner staff as well as refugees from ten African countries including gender practitioners and organizations already engaged in working with men and boys. A four day regional workshop was facilitated by Sonke Gender Justice Network (Sonke) and the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children. (Women’s Commission), in cooperation with UNHCR, to increase and encourage the involvement of men and boys in the work against sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). The participants consisted of multifunctional teams from nine different countries in the Great Lakes region, Eastern Africa and Southern Africa (Uganda, Burundi, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia, Namibia, Zimbabwe, South Africa and Rwanda), a professor from St Cloud’s University and the founder of MAGE in Sierra Leone. The workshop had three main objectives; a) Awareness raising for UNHCR staff, people of concern and NGO partners on addressing masculinities. b) Skills building for UNHCR staff, people of concern and NGO partners on how to integrate masculinities into programs to address SGBV and promote gender equality. c) Development of a critical mass of trainers to undertake training on masculinities throughout the region. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    337844

    Health in all policies: training manual.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2015. [271] p.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) calls on enhanced global efforts to improve health in some of the world’s poorest and most vulnerable communities by tackling the root causes of disease and health inequalities. In order to address this and to spur up action, raise awareness and facilitate implementation of a Health in All Policies (HiAP) approach WHO launched this week a Health in All Policies training manual. This manual is a training resource to increase understanding of the importance of Health in All Policies among health and other professionals. The material will form the basis of 2- and 3-day workshops, which will: build capacity to promote, implement and evaluate HiAP; encourage engagement and collaboration across sectors; facilitate the exchange of experiences and lessons learned; promote regional and global collaboration on HiAP; and promote dissemination of skills to develop training courses for trainers.
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  6. 6
    382419
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO Collaborating Centre for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome for the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait.

    Altawalah H; Al-Nakib W

    Medical Principles and Practice. 2014; 23 Suppl 1:47-51.

    In the early 1980s, the World Health Organization (WHO) designated the Virology Unit of the Faculty of Medicine, Health Sciences Centre, Kuwait University, Kuwait, a collaborating centre for AIDS for the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office (EMRO), recognizing it to be in compliance with WHO guidelines. In this centre, research integral to the efforts of WHO to combat AIDS is conducted. In addition to annual workshops and symposia, the centre is constantly updating and renewing its facilities and capabilities in keeping with current and latest advances in virology. As an example of the activities of the centre, the HIV-1 RNA viral load in plasma samples of HIV-1 patients is determined by real-time PCR using the AmpliPrep TaqMan HIV-1 test v2.0. HIV-1 drug resistance is determined by sequencing the reverse transcriptase and protease regions on the HIV-1 pol gene, using the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Assay on the OpenGene(R) DNA Sequencing System. HIV-1 subtypes are determined by sequencing the reverse transcriptase and protease regions on the HIV-1 pol gene using the genotyping assays described above. A fundamental program of Kuwait's WHO AIDS collaboration centre is the national project on the surveillance of drug resistance in human deficiency virus in Kuwait, which illustrates how the centre and its activities in Kuwait can serve the EMRO region of WHO. (c) 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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  7. 7
    337116

    Road-mapping a total market approach: Eastern Europe and Central Asia Workshops.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; PATH

    Seattle, Washington, PATH, 2013 Apr. [24] p.

    To meet the challenge of sustaining reproductive health commodity security in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the United Nations Population Fund and PATH developed workshops to increase awareness about total market approaches and develop an action plan for the region. This report describes two regional workshops that were held in April 2013.
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  8. 8
    337115

    Road-mapping a total market approach for family planning and reproductive health commodity security. Workshop materials.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; PATH

    Seattle, Washington, PATH, 2013. [40] p.

    To meet the challenge of sustaining reproductive health commodity security in Eastern Europe and Central Asia, the United Nations Population Fund and PATH developed workshops to increase awareness about total market approaches and develop an action plan for the region. These workshop materials are from two regional workshops that were held in April 2013.
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  9. 9
    335173

    Expanding contraceptive choice in West Africa: Building the capacity of local nongovernmental organizations to program holistically.

    Jackson A

    New York, New York, EngenderHealth, RESPOND Project, 2013 Jun. [8] p. (Project Brief No. 15)

    This project brief looks at how nongovernmental organizations can expand access to contraception in West Africa and specifically looks at member associations of the International Planned Parenthood Federation in Benin, Burkina Faso and Togo.
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  10. 10
    334568

    Making health services adolescent friendly: Developing national quality standards for adolescent friendly health services.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2012. [56] p.

    This guidebook sets out the public health rationale for making it easier for adolescents to obtain the health services that they need to protect and improve their health and well-being, including sexual and reproductive health services. It defines ‘adolescent-friendly health services’ from the perspective of quality, and provides step-by-step guidance on developing quality standards for health service provision to adolescents. Drawing upon international experience, it is also tailored to national epidemiological, social, cultural and economic realities, and provides guidance on identifying what actions need to be taken to assess whether appropriate standards have been achieved.
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  11. 11
    355521
    Peer Reviewed

    Progress of implementation of the World Health Organization strategy for HIV drug resistance control in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    Ravasi G; Jack N; Alonso Gonzalez M; Sued O; Perez-Rosales MD; Gomez B; Vila M; Riego Ad; Ghidinelli M

    Revista Panamericana De Salud Publica. 2011 Dec; 30(6):657-62.

    By the end of 2010, Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) achieved 63% antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage. Measures to control HIV drug resistance (HIVDR) at the country level are recommended to maximize the efficacy and sustainability of ART programs. Since 2006, the Pan American Health Organization has supported implementation of the World Health Organization (WHO) strategy for HIVDR prevention and assessment through regional capacity-building activities and direct technical cooperation in 30 LAC countries. By 2010, 85 sites in 19 countries reported early warning indicators, providing information about the extent of potential drivers of drug resistance at the ART site. In 2009, 41.9% of sites did not achieve the WHO target of 100% appropriate first-line prescriptions; 6.3% still experienced high rates (> 20%) of loss to follow-up, and 16.2% had low retention of patients (< 70%) on first-line prescriptions in the first year of treatment. Stock-outs of antiretroviral drugs occurred at 22.7% of sites. Haiti, Guyana, and the Mesoamerican region are planning and implementing WHO HIVDR monitoring surveys or threshold surveys. New HIVDR surveillance tools for concentrated epidemics would promote further scale-up. Extending the WHO HIVDR lab network in Latin America is key to strengthening regional lab capacity to support quality assured HIVDR surveillance. The WHO HIVDR control strategy is feasible and can be rolled out in LAC. Integrating HIVDR activities in national HIV care and treatment plans is key to ensuring the sustainability of this strategy.
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  12. 12
    332290

    Supporting country-led initiatives to strengthen national health information systems in East Africa.

    Coleman T; Garten AD

    Washington, D.C., Futures Group, Health Policy Initiative, 2009 Oct. [34] p. (USAID Contract No. GPO-I-01-05-00040-00)

    In response to a growing recognition of the importance of reliable and timely health information systems (HIS) to support improved decisionmaking for public health action and health systems strengthening, USAID supported a regional forum in East Africa that focused on engaging HIS champions from key public sectors -- including health, finance, telecommunications, and vital statistics -- and supporting country ownership of HIS. Toward that end, delegations from six focus countries (Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda, with Namibia and Sudan as observers) convened for a three-day workshop, "Country Ownership Strategies: Leadership Forum on Health Information Systems," in Addis Ababa from August 10-13, 2009. As part of the preparation and planning for this forum, the USAID |Health Policy Initiative, Task Order 1 designed and executed a semi-structured qualitative survey to capture the current state of HIS in each of the six focus countries. This report highlights the results of that survey and includes background materials that supported the survey process. Given the overall success of the first forum, USAID is exploring ways to replicate this activity in other regions and continue to provide country-specific technical and financial assistance for HIS strengthening..
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  13. 13
    331627

    Developing and testing strategies for increasing awareness of the IUDas a contraceptive option.

    Vernon R; Khan ME; Birungi H; Askew I; Stones W

    [Washington, D.C.], Population Council, Frontiers in Reproductive Health, 2007 Dec. 21 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-98-00012-00)

    Much of the programmatic and research experience gained over the past two decades has focused on increasing understanding of supply-side factors that limit the provision and use of the IUD, for example, developing training programs, demonstrating the ability of lower level medical staff to provide the method, and assessing the interaction between IUDs, STIs and, more recently, HIV. There is now sufficient empirical evidence from a range of settings to allow program managers and technical assistance organizations to develop guidelines and plans for strengthening the systems necessary to support country-level introduction or 'rehabilitation'; of the IUD within a program offering a range of contraceptive choices. The objectives were: To conduct a meeting of researchers and program managers from three continents and several international organizations to review reasons for under-utilization of the IUD and recent experiences in increasing awareness about the IUD; To develop proposals for operations research projects to test the most promising interventions to introduce and expand access to IUD services and to implement the projects with national partner organizations; To disseminate results of the successful strategies. (Excerpts]
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  14. 14
    323040
    Peer Reviewed

    Improved data, methods and tools for the 2007 HIV and AIDS estimates and projections.

    Ghys PD; Walker N; McFarland W; Miller R; Garnett GP

    Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2008; 84(Suppl 1):i1-i4.

    This introductory article refers to the journal supplement that assembles important new data relating to several assumptions used for the new HIV and AIDS estimates. The collection of methodological papers in the supplement, aim to provide easy access to the scientific basis underlying the latest HIV and AIDS estimates for 2007.
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  15. 15
    327448

    Strengthening the Education Sector Response to HIV and AIDS in the Caribbean. UNESCO / WB partnership in support of CARICOM strategy in education and HIV and AIDS.

    Bundy DA; Fontani P; Ruiz Devesa D; O'Connell TE; Babb J

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2007 Dec 14. 29 p.

    This report presents the findings and outcomes of the three joint UNESCO/WB missions to Guyana, Jamaica and St. Lucia, and elaborates on next steps identified for action at both national and regional levels. The report also sets these findings and next steps within the broader context of the Caribbean plan for action and presents in its appendices, sample resources to guide the development of a comprehensive response to HIV & AIDS by the education sector.
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  16. 16
    326030

    Workshop report: Appraising HIV / AIDS Prevention Curricular Materials and Teaching-Learning Resources, Geneva, Switzerland, 9-11 June 2003.

    UNESCO. International Bureau of Education

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNESCO, International Bureau of Education, 2003 Jul 14. 11 p. (IBE/2003/RP/HV/01)

    The IBE organized this workshop as part of UNESCO's common effort to make existing curriculum documents and teaching-learning materials for HIV/AIDS education easily accessible, and to identify and disseminate good practices and lessons learned, with the aim of improving the overall success of education as principal means of combating the epidemic. Three objectives have been identified for this workshop: discuss and improve the set of appraisal criteria prepared by the IBE to assess curricular materials and teaching-learning resources for HIV/AIDS prevention in schools; apply the proposed appraisal criterial to analyze concrete curriculum materials and teaching learning resources brought by the participants and identify good practices and lessons learned; formulate follow-up actions and recommendations for future collaboration among participants for identification and promotion of promising approaches and good practice. Presentations of the participants the first day and discussions on important issues and challenges that the education sector faces in designing and implementing HIV/AIDS prevention in schools provided valuable information, but also crucial questions on how to continue the work. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    322581

    Implementing the UN learning strategy on HIV / AIDS: sixteen case studies.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2007 Mar. 97 p. (UNAIDS/07.08E; JC1311E)

    In April 2003, the Committee of Cosponsoring Organizations of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) approved a Learning Strategy to help UN system staff develop competence on HIV and AIDS. The goals of the Learning Strategy are: to develop the knowledge and competence of the UN and its staff so that they are able to best support national responses to HIV and AIDS; and to ensure that all UN staff members are able to make informed decisions to protect themselves from HIV and, if they are infected or affected by HIV, to ensure that they know where to turn for the best possible care and treatment. This includes ensuring that staff members fully understand the UN's HIV and AIDS workplace policies and how they are implemented. To support UN country teams to implement the Learning Strategy, Learning Facilitators were selected at country level and trained in a series of regional workshops. The Learning Facilitators were then expected to ensure - along with the country teams-that the standards of the Learning Strategy were realized. This report is comprised of UN HIV/AIDS Learning Strategy case studies from sixteen countries: Botswana, Brazil, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, India, Indonesia, Macedonia, Madagascar, Morocco, Nigeria, the Pan American Health Organization headquarters (United States), Pakistan, Paraguay, Vienna (Austria), Viet Nam, and Yemen. It presents each country's unique experience in implementing the strategy since its adoption in 2003. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    321700

    Supporting gender justice in Afghanistan: opportunities and challenges.

    Mantovani A

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 8 p.

    For 25 years war raged in Afghanistan, destroying both the institutional fiber of the country and its justice system. Even in the period before the wars, the justice system had only managed to impose itself sporadically. Disputes that arose had to be resolved, for the most part, through informal religious or tribal systems. However acceptable some of the main laws may have been technically, they were offset by various factors: the poor training of judges, lawyers and other legal workers; decaying infrastructures; and ignorance of the law and basic rights by common citizens and even the judges themselves. The prison system had suffered even greater damages. Its infrastructure and organization were in ruins. Today enormous efforts have been mobilized to build a fair and functioning system that is respectful of human rights and international standards. It will take years for the Afghan government and people to do the job-with the help of the international community. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    321699

    The implementation of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 in the eyes of the mover.

    Nandi-Ndaitwah N

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 5 p.

    Why Women and Peace? The theme imposed itself. The last year of the 20th century represented an invitation and challenge to recapitulate and remember as well as to compare scores and balance sheets of the turbulent epoch we were leaving behind. No doubt, the 20th century was the century of wars. As never before in human history civilians paid the highest price of conflicts and conflagrations. In the two world wars and innumerable local wars, interventions, internal ethnic clashes, revolutions and coups, more than 100 million people were killed - the vast majority of them being civilians. Sometimes they were directly targeted; at other times they were "collateral damage" - to use an ugly euphemism coined by NATO during its 1999 intervention against Yugoslavia. From Hiroshima and Nagasaki to Vietnam to Pol Pot's Cambodia to Iran-Iraq to Afghanistan to Liberia to Sierra Leone to Rwanda to Burundi to Colombia to Iraq again... it is the civilians who suffered the most and among them, women and childrenas the most vulnerable ones. (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    321698

    Talking points.

    de La Sabliere JM

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 4 p.

    Unfortunately, this is extremely well documented in countries in conflict. Many of the reports submitted to the Security Council include mention of the use of rape as a weapon of war. Recently, a report of the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC) on the situation of human rights in Ituri provided information on this problem which is as specific as it is frightening. But, paradoxically, in countries which are not in conflict, the issue of violence against women is often neglected, where it is not concealed. But the private sphere cannot be an area where rights do not apply. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    321693

    Breaking the silence -- rape as an international crime.

    Ellis M

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 5 p.

    In 1999, I stood among a sea of 20,000 desperate people on a dirt airfield outside Skopje, Macedonia, listening to one harrowing story after another. I had come to the Stenkovec refugee camp to record those stories and to help set up a system for documenting atrocities in Kosovo. The refugees with whom I spoke described being robbed, beaten, herded together and forced to flee their villages with nothing but the clothes they were wearing. Yet, what I remember most vividly are the lost expressions on the faces of the young women and girls in the camp. At first, they did not speak a word. Their silence acted as a veil, concealing crimes that they could not emotionally recollect. However, slowly, through time and comfort in speaking to female counsellors, their stories emerged. The brutality and systematic consistency of the sexual violence perpetrated on these women were mind-numbing. The widespread practice of rape against Muslim women was more than a consequence of war, it was an instrument of war with the intent of destroying the cultural fabric of a targeted group. This experience brought home to me a truism in international and national conflict: women suffer disproportionately to the atrocities committed against civilians. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    321122

    Engaging faith-based organizations in HIV prevention. A training manual for programme managers.

    Toure A; Melek M; Jato M; Kane M; Kajungu R

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2007. [53] p.

    The influence behind faith-based organizations is not difficult to discern. In many developing countries, FBOs not only provide spiritual guidance to their followers; they are often the primary providers for a variety of local health and social services. Situated within communities and building on relationships of trust, these organizations have the ability to influence the attitudes and behaviours of their fellow community members. Moreover, they are in close and regular contact with all age groups in society and their word is respected. In fact, in some traditional communities, religious leaders are often more influential than local government officials or secular community leaders. Many of the case studies researched for the UNFPA publication Culture Matters showed that the involvement of faith-based organizations in UNFPA-supported projects enhanced negotiations with governments and civil society on culturally sensitive issues. Gradually, these experiences are being shared across countries andacross regions, which has facilitated interfaith dialogue on the most effective approaches to prevent the spread of HIV. Such dialogue has also helped convince various faith-based organizations that joining together as a united front is the most effective way to fight the spread of HIV and lessen the impact of AIDS. This manual is a capacity-building tool to help policy makers and programmers identify, design and follow up on HIV prevention programmes undertaken by FBOs. The manual can also be used by development practitioners partnering with FBOs to increase their understanding of the role of FBOs in HIV prevention, and to design plans for partnering with FBOs to halt the spread of the virus. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    321375
    Peer Reviewed

    The introduction of confidential enquiries into maternal deaths and near-miss case reviews in the WHO European region.

    Bacci A; Lewis G; Baltag V; Bertran AP

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2007 Sep; 15(30):145-152.

    Most maternal deaths can be averted with known, effective interventions but countries require information about which women are dying and why, and what can been done to prevent such deaths in future. This paper describes the introduction of two approaches to reviewing maternal deaths and severe obstetric complications in 12 countries in transition in the WHO European Region - national-level confidential enquiries into maternal deaths and facility-based near-miss case reviews. Initially, two regional meetings involving stakeholders from 12 countries were held in 2004-2005, followed by national meetings in seven of the countries. The Republic of Moldova was the first to pilot the review process, preceded by a technical workshop to make detailed plans, provide training in how to facilitate and carry out a review, finalise clinical guidelines against which the findings of the confidential enquiry and near-miss case review could be judged, and a range of other preparatory work. To date, near-miss case reviews have been carried out in the three main referral hospitals in Moldova, and a national committee appointed by the Ministry of Health to conduct the confidential enquiry has met twice. Several other countries have begun a similar process, but progress may remain slow due to continuing fears of punitive actions against health professionals who have a mother or baby die in their care. (author's)
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  24. 24
    320924

    Policy Workshop on HIV / AIDS and Family Well-being, Windhoek, Namibia, 28-30 January 2004.

    United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs

    [New York, New York], United Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs, 2004. 21 p.

    The Policy Workshop was organized by the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs and hosted by the Government of Namibia, National Planning Commission Secretariat. It was held at Windhoek, Namibia. The purpose of the workshop was to bring together representatives of governments and non-governmental organizations as well as academic experts and practitioners from various countries in southern Africa to discuss the impact of HIV/AIDS on families in the region, to consider how families and communities are coping with the disease, and to contribute to the development of a strategic policy framework to assist Governments to strengthen the capacity of families and family networks to cope. In order to compare experience across regions, a participant from Eastern Europe was also invited to the workshop. (excerpt)
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  25. 25
    320992
    Peer Reviewed

    Surgical services in low-income and middle-income countries.

    Spiegel DA; Gosselin RA

    Lancet. 2007 Sep 22; 370(9592):1013-1015.

    Although substantial progress has been made in addressing the burden of communicable and vaccine-preventable diseases in low-income and middle-income countries, the burden of diseases that are surgically treatable is increasing and has been neglected. Both morbidity and mortality from surgically preventable (eg, elective hernia repair) or treatable (eg, strangulated hernia) disorders can be greatly decreased through simple surgical interventions. Why should a child die from appendicitis, or a mother and child succumb to obstructed labour, when simple surgical procedures can save their lives? Why should patients suffer permanent disability because of congenital abnormalities, fractures, burns, or the sequelae of acute infections such as septic arthritis or osteomyelitis? Many complications of HIV infection (eg, abscesses, fistulas, Kaposi sarcoma) are also amenable to simple surgical interventions. Available epidemiological information and experiential evidence lend support to the conclusion that basic surgical and anaesthetic services should be integrated into primary health-care packages. (excerpt)
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