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  1. 1
    313141

    Joint ILO / UNESCO Caribbean Sub-Regional Workshop: Improving Responses to HIV / AIDS in Education Sector Workplaces. Report. September 28-30, 2005, Hilton Kingston Hotel, Jamaica.

    Budhlall P

    Geneva, Switzerland, International Labour Organization [ILO], 2006. [44] p.

    The workshop was organized under the auspices of an ILO-initiated programme during 2004-2005 to enhance a sectoral approach to HIV/AIDS education sector workplaces, as a complement to the ILO?s Code of Practice on HIV/AIDS in the world of work, adopted in 2001. A number of research papers and assessments prepared by international organizations in recent years have highlighted the vulnerability of education sector workers, foremost teachers, who are considered to be highly susceptible to HIV and AIDS infection in developing countries. The high prevalence, disability and mortality rates among these personnel in turn deprive affected countries of some of their most educated and skilled human resources. Moreover, teachers are often not trained or supported to deal with the HIV/AIDS crisis within schools, and the disease has also affected the management capacity of education systems to respond to mounting crises. In 2005, UNESCO joined forces with the ILO to spearhead the development of an HIV and AIDSworkplace strategy for the Caribbean which has as its objective the development of a model workplace policy and related resource materials for use by education staff and stakeholders at national and institutional levels of a nation?s education system. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    313139

    Joint ILO / UNESCO Southern African Subregional Workshop, 30 November - 2 December 2005, Maputo, Mozambique. Improving responses to HIV / AIDS in education sector workplaces. Report.

    International Labour Organization [ILO]; UNESCO

    Geneva, Switzerland, ILO, 2006. 63 p.

    The workshop was organized under the auspices of an ILO programme initiated in 2004, developing a sectoral approach to HIV/AIDS education sector workplaces, as a complement to the ILO's code of practice HIV/AIDS and the world of work, adopted in 2001. A number of research papers and assessments prepared by international organizations in recent years have highlighted the impact of HIV and AIDS on the education sector workforce in developing countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. High prevalence results in morbidity and mortality rates which deprive affected countries of some of their most educated and skilled human resources. In addition, teachers are often not trained or supported to deal with HIV in schools, and the disease has also affected the management capacity of education systems. In 2005, UNESCO joined the ILO in a collaborative project, aimed at the development of an HIV and AIDS workplace policy and related resource materials for use by education staff and stakeholders at national and institutional levels in southern African countries. The workshop in Maputo brought together representatives of government (ministries of labour and education), employer organizations and teacher/educator unions from seven countries to participate in this process, along with representatives of regional and international organizations (see Appendix 1 for list of participants). (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    313135

    HIV and AIDS and educator development, conduct, and support.

    Attawell K; Elder K

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 Mar. 37 p. (Good Policy and Practice in HIV and AIDS and Education Booklet No. 3; ED-2006/WS/4; cld 26006)

    UNESCO recognizes the significant impact of HIV and AIDS on international development, and in particular on progress towards achieving Education For All (EFA). As the UN agency with a mandate in education and a co-sponsor of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS), UNESCO takes a comprehensive approach to HIV and AIDS. It recognizes that education can play a critical role in preventing future HIV infections and that one of its primary roles is to help learners and educators in formal and non-formal education systems to avoid infection. It also recognizes its responsibility to address and respond to the impact of the epidemic on formal and non-formal education systems, and the need to expand efforts to address issues related to care, treatment and support of those infected and affected by HIV. UNESCO's global strategy for responding to HIV and AIDS is guided by four key principles, and focuses on five core tasks. The guiding principles that are the foundation of UNESCO's response to HIV and AIDS are: Work towards expanding educational opportunities and the quality of education for all; A multi-pronged approach that addresses both risk (individual awareness and behaviour) and vulnerability (contextual factors); Promotion and protection of human rights, promotion of gender equality, and elimination of violence (notably violence against women), stigma and discrimination; An approach to prevention based on providing information that is scientifically sound, culturally appropriate, and effectively communicated, and helping learners and educators to develop the skills they need to prevent HIV infection and to tackle HIV and AIDS-related discrimination. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    195828

    UNESCO Nairobi cluster consultation: HIV / AIDS and the role of education service commissions, 16th to 18th June 2003, Kampala, Uganda. [Consultation de groupe du bureau nairobien de l'UNESCO : le VIH/SIDA et le rôle des commissions des services d'éducation, du 16 au 18 juin 2003, à Kampala, Ouganda]

    Nkinyangi S; Ochanda A

    Nairobi, Kenya, UNESCO, 2003. 46 p.

    The UNESCO Nairobi Office organised the second in a series of consultations on HIV/AIDS and education at the Nile Conference Centre in Kampala, Uganda, from 16th to 18th June 2003. This was convened upon recommendation of the first consultation on HIV/AIDS and education organised by UNESCO Nairobi that took place in Kigali, Rwanda, in March 2003. A key recommendation of the Kigali consultation was to bring together the heads of the education and teachers’ service commissions from the cluster countries, namely, Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda, to review how the HIV/AIDS pandemic is affecting the quality of the teaching service. The Kampala consultation, therefore, convened heads of Education and Teachers’ Service Commissions, those responsible for human resources in education, finance departments, leaders of teachers’ unions and UNESCO representatives from the cluster. Also participating in the consultation were members of the Mobile Task Team on HIV and Education – the MTT. The purpose of the consultation was to enhance the understanding on how HIV/AIDS is influencing the education service and the provision of quality education and how those responsible for teacher management can sustain the quality of education provision in the face of HIV/AIDS. The consultation had three main objectives. The first was to increase awareness among educator management authorities about the principal challenges imposed by HIV/AIDS to the quality of the teaching service. The second was to enhance commitment among senior management of teaching services and ministries of education to respond appropriately to the impact of HIV/AIDS on the teaching service, on quality of education and on individual educators as employees. The third objective was to identify priority actions within the management of education service commissions and within education human resource management generally and to come up with action plans. (excerpt)
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