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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    326027

    Strangers in foreign lands: Diversity, vulnerability and the rights of migrants.

    de Varennes F

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2003. 37 p. (SHS/SRP/MIG/2003/PI/H/2)

    Globalization and increased population flows across borders have created a daunting challenge for the international community: the need to address the particular vulnerability of migrants. While migrant workers often make significant contributions to the economies and societies of the State in which they work and of their State of origin they remain, from a legal point of view, more vulnerable than many other groups who have the benefit of clearer and more wide-ranging international and regional legal protections. This is because the development and acceptance - especially from more developed States - of international legal standards to protect migrants' rights has been very slow, with the UN Convention on the Protection of all Migrant Workers and Members of their Families only entering into force in 2003. The rights contained in the Migrant Workers' Convention are human rights. They are indicators as to how governments may protect migrants and better manage the problems and opportunities of international migration. This may also help avoid the dangers of racism, intolerance and xenophobia which may result when there is not a balanced view of both positive and negative aspects of migration movements and their effects on the economies and societies of both host States and States of origin. The global challenge which international migration represents calls for a global approach. UNESCO - as part of its role in the field of migration, social integration and cultural diversity - has been bringing together researchers, policy-makers, NGOs and other interested parties to deal with various facets of this challenge, including the adoption of the Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity and the launch of a much needed campaign for the ratification of the Migrant Workers' Convention. (author's)
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  2. 2
    321735

    The role of men and boys in the fight against HIV / AIDS in the world of work. Preliminary issues paper.

    International Labour Office [ILO]

    [Unpublished] 2003. Prepared for the United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women (DAW) in collaboration with International Labour Organization (ILO), Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS (UNAIDS), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Expert Group Meeting on “The Role of Men and Boys in Achieving Gender Equality”, Brasilia, Brazil, October 21-24, 2003. 23 p. (EGM/Men-Boys-GE/2003/WP.3)

    HIV/AIDS is a cross-cutting issue for the ILO, and it is being mainstreamed into all major ILO activities. As HIV/AIDS is a major cause of poverty and discrimination, it is aggravating existing problems of inadequate social protection and gender inequality. The fight against HIV/AIDS requires significant attention to gender issues to guarantee progress. The labour force is being particularly affected by the impact of the pandemic. The majority of those who die of AIDS are adults in their prime - workers in their most productive years. In 1999, for example, 80 per cent of newly infected people in Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia were aged between 20 and 49. Projections made by the ILO indicate that the labour force in 15 African countries will be 10 to 32 per cent smaller by 2020 than it would have been without HIV/AIDS. Many of those infected with HIV are experienced and skilled workers in blue-collar and white-collar jobs, from managers to car mechanics, from producers of food to teachers and doctors. The loss of huge numbers of skilled personnel is having serious effects on the ability of nations to remain productive and deliver basic services. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    313135

    HIV and AIDS and educator development, conduct, and support.

    Attawell K; Elder K

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 Mar. 37 p. (Good Policy and Practice in HIV and AIDS and Education Booklet No. 3; ED-2006/WS/4; cld 26006)

    UNESCO recognizes the significant impact of HIV and AIDS on international development, and in particular on progress towards achieving Education For All (EFA). As the UN agency with a mandate in education and a co-sponsor of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS), UNESCO takes a comprehensive approach to HIV and AIDS. It recognizes that education can play a critical role in preventing future HIV infections and that one of its primary roles is to help learners and educators in formal and non-formal education systems to avoid infection. It also recognizes its responsibility to address and respond to the impact of the epidemic on formal and non-formal education systems, and the need to expand efforts to address issues related to care, treatment and support of those infected and affected by HIV. UNESCO's global strategy for responding to HIV and AIDS is guided by four key principles, and focuses on five core tasks. The guiding principles that are the foundation of UNESCO's response to HIV and AIDS are: Work towards expanding educational opportunities and the quality of education for all; A multi-pronged approach that addresses both risk (individual awareness and behaviour) and vulnerability (contextual factors); Promotion and protection of human rights, promotion of gender equality, and elimination of violence (notably violence against women), stigma and discrimination; An approach to prevention based on providing information that is scientifically sound, culturally appropriate, and effectively communicated, and helping learners and educators to develop the skills they need to prevent HIV infection and to tackle HIV and AIDS-related discrimination. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    313133

    Good policy and practice in HIV and AIDS and education. Booklet 1: Overview.

    Attawell K; Elder K

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 May. 24 p. (Good Policy and Practice in HIV and AIDS and Education Booklet No. 1; ED-2006/WS/2; cld 26002)

    HIV and AIDS affect the demand for, supply and quality of education. In some countries, the epidemic is reducing demand for education, as children become sick or are taken out of school and as fewer households are financially able to support their children?s education. However, it is difficult to generalize about the impact of HIV and AIDS on educational demand and important not to make assumptions about declining enrolments. Lack of accurate data on this question is a problem. For example, in Botswana absenteeism rates are relatively low in primary schools and there is some evidence to show that orphans have better attendance records than non-orphans. In Malawi and Uganda, where absenteeism is high among all primary school age students, there is less difference in school attendance between orphans and non-orphans than expected . (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    300182

    Draft joint ILO / WHO guidelines on health services and HIV / AIDS.

    International Labour Organization [ILO]; World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, ILO, 2005. 60 p. (TMEHS/2005)

    These guidelines are the product of collaboration between the International Labour Organization and the World Health Organization. In view of their complementary mandates, long-standing and close cooperation in the area of occupational health, and their more recent partnership as co-sponsors of UNAIDS, the ILO and the WHO decided to join forces in order to assist health services in building their capacities to provide their workers with a safe, healthy and decent working environment, as the most effective way both to reduce transmission of HIV and other blood-borne viruses and to improve the delivery of care to patients. This is essential when health service workers have not only to deliver normal health-care services but also to provide HIV/AIDS services and manage the long-term administration and monitoring of anti-retroviral treatments (ART) at a time when, in many countries, they are themselves decimated by the epidemic. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    290936

    Joint ILO / WHO guidelines on health services and HIV / AIDS. Tripartite Meeting of Experts to Develop Joint ILO / WHO Guidelines on Health Services and HIV / AIDS.

    International Labour Organisation [ILO]; World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, ILO, 2005. [65] p. (TMEHS/2005/8)

    These guidelines are the product of collaboration between the International Labour Organization and the World Health Organization. In view of their complementary mandates, their long-standing and close cooperation in the area of occupational health, and their more recent partnership as co-sponsors of UNAIDS, the ILO and the WHO decided to join forces in order to assist health services in building their capacities to provide their workers with a safe, healthy and decent working environment, as the most effective way both to reduce transmission of HIV and other blood-borne pathogens and to improve the delivery of care to patients. This is essential when health service workers have not only to deliver normal health-care services but also to provide HIV/AIDS services and manage the long-term administration and monitoring of anti-retroviral treatments (ART) at a time when, in many countries, they are themselves decimated by the epidemic. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    195921

    An ILO code of practice on HIV / AIDS and the world of work.

    International Labour Office [ILO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, ILO, 2001. vi, 32 p.

    The objective of this code is to provide a set of guidelines to address the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the world of work and within the framework of the promotion of decent work. The guidelines cover the following key areas of action: (a) prevention of HIV/AIDS; (b) management and mitigation of the impact of HIV/AIDS on the world of work; (c) care and support of workers infected and affected by HIV/AIDS; (d) elimination of stigma and discrimination on the basis of real or perceived HIV status. This code should be used to: (a) develop concrete responses at enterprise, community, regional, sectoral, national and international levels; (b) promote processes of dialogue, consultations, negotiations and all forms of cooperation between governments, employers and workers and their representatives, occupational health personnel, specialists in HIV/AIDS issues, and all relevant stakeholders (which may include community-based and non-governmental organizations (NGOs)); (c) give effect to its contents in consultation with the social partners: in national laws, policies and programmes of action; in workplace/enterprise agreements; and in workplace policies and plans of action. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    188153

    Accelerating action against AIDS in Africa.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2003 Sep. 74 p. (UNAIDS/03.44E)

    This report provides a snapshot of the action being taken across the African continent in response to the challenge of AIDS. It highlights governments working with all their ministries to deliver a full-scale response. It demonstrates progress in closing the gaps in the provision of HIV prevention and treatment. It shows the value of partnership between government, communities and businesses. It showcases the determination of African women to throw off the disproportionate burden that AIDS represents for them. And it makes manifest the voice of hope, in the many successful responses by young people in fighting the epidemic. (author's)
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