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  1. 1
    303750

    We Care. Around the world.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. We Care

    New York, New York, UNDP, [2003]. 16 p.

    The 22 country offices where the We Care programme has been rolled out are taking great strides in making their workplaces truly AIDS competent. We are beginning to understand that HIV/AIDS is not 'out there' but among us -- and that if we are to make a difference in the way the world responds to it, WE MUST BEGIN WITH OURSELVES. Today, the We Care initiative is a global programme aiming at creating HIV/AIDS competence in all country offices, regional offices and headquarters by end of 2005. We Care is promoted together with initiatives spearheaded by other UN agencies, including 'Caring for Us' by UNICEF, the joint Access to Treatment and Inter-Organisational Needs (ACTION) programme facilitated by the UN Secretariat and the 'HIV/AIDS in the Workplace' initiative by WFP and ILO. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    300909

    Report on the global HIV / AIDS epidemic, July 2002.

    Marais H; Wilson A

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], 2002 Jul. 226 p. (UNAIDS/02.26E)

    In the past two years, the sense of common purpose in the worldwide struggle against HIV/AIDS has intensified. More than at any other time in the short history of the epidemic, the need to translate local and national examples of success into a global movement has become manifest. The political momentum to tackle AIDS has grown. Public opinion in many countries has been mobilized by the media, nongovernmental organizations, activists, doctors, economists, and people living with HIV/AIDS. Communities and nations are progressively taking the lead in responding to the epidemic with increased political commitment, resources and institutional initiatives. But this new political resolve is not universal. An unacceptable number of governments and civil society institutions are still in a state of denial about the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and are failing to act to prevent its further spread or alleviate its impact. By failing to act, governments and civil society are turning their backs on the possibility of success against AIDS. Where the moment of action has been seized, there is mounting evidence of inroads being made against the epidemic. Alongside the familiar achievements of Senegal, Thailand and Uganda, there are new successes on every continent. Despite emerging from genocide and conflict, Cambodia responded to the threat of HIV in the mid-1990s and has achieved marked declines in both the levels of HIV and the high-risk behaviours associated with its transmission. The infection rate among pregnant women in Cambodia declined by almost a third between 1997 and 2000. The Philippines has acted early to forestall the epidemic, keeping HIV rates low with strong prevention efforts and the mobilization of community and business organizations. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    276607

    The faces, voices and skills behind the GIPA Workplace Model in South Africa. UNAIDS Case Study.

    Simon-Meyer J; Odallo D

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], 2002 Jun. [59] p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS Case Study; UNAIDS/02.36E; PN-ACP-803)

    South Africa has begun to explore how best to involve people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) in workplace responses to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. A pilot programme, the GIPA Workplace Model, has been developed over the past four years with the support of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Its aim was to place trained fieldworkers, living openly with HIV/AIDS, in selected partner organizations in different sectors so that they could set up, review or enrich workplace policies and programmes. For partner organizations, the GIPA Workplace Model has added value by: adding credibility to its HIV/AIDS programmes by giving a face to HIV and personalizing it; creating a supportive environment for people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) and others to speak about HIV/AIDS and issues related to it. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    188153

    Accelerating action against AIDS in Africa.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2003 Sep. 74 p. (UNAIDS/03.44E)

    This report provides a snapshot of the action being taken across the African continent in response to the challenge of AIDS. It highlights governments working with all their ministries to deliver a full-scale response. It demonstrates progress in closing the gaps in the provision of HIV prevention and treatment. It shows the value of partnership between government, communities and businesses. It showcases the determination of African women to throw off the disproportionate burden that AIDS represents for them. And it makes manifest the voice of hope, in the many successful responses by young people in fighting the epidemic. (author's)
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