Your search found 33 Results

  1. 1
    371803

    Working together with businesses. Guidance on TB and TB/HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care in the workplace.

    Dias HM; Uplekar; Amekudzi K; Reid A; Hsu LN; Wilburn S; Mohaupt D

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization {WHO], 2012. 46 p.

    The corporate and business sector belong to a wide range of care providers that offer TB and HIV care to significant proportions of working populations. While considerable literature is now available on diverse public-private mix interventions for TB care and control, there is a dearth of documentation and updated guidance on business sector initiatives in TB care. To address the need for guiding principles to initiate and scale up the engagement of the business sector in TB and HIV care, the WHO in collaboration with ILO, UNAIDS and other partners conducted an assessment of business sector initiatives to address TB and TB/HIV, documented working examples on the ground, and organized an expert consultation to discuss and draw lessons from available evidence. The purpose of this document is to capitalize on the untapped potential of the business sector to respond to these two epidemics. Built on the 2003 guidelines on contribution of workplaces to TB control prepared jointly by the ILO and WHO, these guidelines should help capitalize on increased awareness about TB and HIV and their impact on businesses, and strengthen partnerships between national TB programmes, national HIV programmes, and the business sector to improve TB and HIV prevention, treatment and care activities. Existing guidance to facilitate business participation predominantly focuses on HIV. This document is therefore principally centred on TB prevention, treatment and care and it’s linkages with HIV. This document is designed to provide guidance to TB and HIV programme managers, employers, workers organizations, occupational health staff and other partners on the need and ways to work in partnership to design and implement workplace TB/HIV prevention, treatment and care programmes integrated with occupational health and HIV workplace programmes where relevant. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    326027

    Strangers in foreign lands: Diversity, vulnerability and the rights of migrants.

    de Varennes F

    [Paris, France], UNESCO, 2003. 37 p. (SHS/SRP/MIG/2003/PI/H/2)

    Globalization and increased population flows across borders have created a daunting challenge for the international community: the need to address the particular vulnerability of migrants. While migrant workers often make significant contributions to the economies and societies of the State in which they work and of their State of origin they remain, from a legal point of view, more vulnerable than many other groups who have the benefit of clearer and more wide-ranging international and regional legal protections. This is because the development and acceptance - especially from more developed States - of international legal standards to protect migrants' rights has been very slow, with the UN Convention on the Protection of all Migrant Workers and Members of their Families only entering into force in 2003. The rights contained in the Migrant Workers' Convention are human rights. They are indicators as to how governments may protect migrants and better manage the problems and opportunities of international migration. This may also help avoid the dangers of racism, intolerance and xenophobia which may result when there is not a balanced view of both positive and negative aspects of migration movements and their effects on the economies and societies of both host States and States of origin. The global challenge which international migration represents calls for a global approach. UNESCO - as part of its role in the field of migration, social integration and cultural diversity - has been bringing together researchers, policy-makers, NGOs and other interested parties to deal with various facets of this challenge, including the adoption of the Universal Declaration on Cultural Diversity and the launch of a much needed campaign for the ratification of the Migrant Workers' Convention. (author's)
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  3. 3
    322030

    Taking stock: Health worker shortages and the response to AIDS.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. HIV / AIDS Programme

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2006. 15 p. (WHO/HIV/2006.05)

    In August 2006, the World Health Organization (WHO) launched a coordinated global effort to address a major and often overlooked barrier to preventing and treating HIV: the severe shortage of health workers, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Called 'Treat, Train, Retain' (TTR), the plan is an important component of WHO's overall efforts to strengthen human resources for health and to promote comprehensive national strategies for human resource development across different disease programmes. It is also part of WHO's effort to promote universal access to HIV/AIDS services. TTR will strengthen and expand the health workforce by addressing both the causes and the effects of HIV and AIDS for health workers (Box). Meeting this global commitment will depend on strong and effective health-care systems that are capable of delivering services on a scale much larger than today's. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    321735

    The role of men and boys in the fight against HIV / AIDS in the world of work. Preliminary issues paper.

    International Labour Office [ILO]

    [Unpublished] 2003. Prepared for the United Nations Division for the Advancement of Women (DAW) in collaboration with International Labour Organization (ILO), Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS (UNAIDS), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Expert Group Meeting on “The Role of Men and Boys in Achieving Gender Equality”, Brasilia, Brazil, October 21-24, 2003. 23 p. (EGM/Men-Boys-GE/2003/WP.3)

    HIV/AIDS is a cross-cutting issue for the ILO, and it is being mainstreamed into all major ILO activities. As HIV/AIDS is a major cause of poverty and discrimination, it is aggravating existing problems of inadequate social protection and gender inequality. The fight against HIV/AIDS requires significant attention to gender issues to guarantee progress. The labour force is being particularly affected by the impact of the pandemic. The majority of those who die of AIDS are adults in their prime - workers in their most productive years. In 1999, for example, 80 per cent of newly infected people in Rwanda, Tanzania, Uganda and Zambia were aged between 20 and 49. Projections made by the ILO indicate that the labour force in 15 African countries will be 10 to 32 per cent smaller by 2020 than it would have been without HIV/AIDS. Many of those infected with HIV are experienced and skilled workers in blue-collar and white-collar jobs, from managers to car mechanics, from producers of food to teachers and doctors. The loss of huge numbers of skilled personnel is having serious effects on the ability of nations to remain productive and deliver basic services. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    313141

    Joint ILO / UNESCO Caribbean Sub-Regional Workshop: Improving Responses to HIV / AIDS in Education Sector Workplaces. Report. September 28-30, 2005, Hilton Kingston Hotel, Jamaica.

    Budhlall P

    Geneva, Switzerland, International Labour Organization [ILO], 2006. [44] p.

    The workshop was organized under the auspices of an ILO-initiated programme during 2004-2005 to enhance a sectoral approach to HIV/AIDS education sector workplaces, as a complement to the ILO?s Code of Practice on HIV/AIDS in the world of work, adopted in 2001. A number of research papers and assessments prepared by international organizations in recent years have highlighted the vulnerability of education sector workers, foremost teachers, who are considered to be highly susceptible to HIV and AIDS infection in developing countries. The high prevalence, disability and mortality rates among these personnel in turn deprive affected countries of some of their most educated and skilled human resources. Moreover, teachers are often not trained or supported to deal with the HIV/AIDS crisis within schools, and the disease has also affected the management capacity of education systems to respond to mounting crises. In 2005, UNESCO joined forces with the ILO to spearhead the development of an HIV and AIDSworkplace strategy for the Caribbean which has as its objective the development of a model workplace policy and related resource materials for use by education staff and stakeholders at national and institutional levels of a nation?s education system. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    313139

    Joint ILO / UNESCO Southern African Subregional Workshop, 30 November - 2 December 2005, Maputo, Mozambique. Improving responses to HIV / AIDS in education sector workplaces. Report.

    International Labour Organization [ILO]; UNESCO

    Geneva, Switzerland, ILO, 2006. 63 p.

    The workshop was organized under the auspices of an ILO programme initiated in 2004, developing a sectoral approach to HIV/AIDS education sector workplaces, as a complement to the ILO's code of practice HIV/AIDS and the world of work, adopted in 2001. A number of research papers and assessments prepared by international organizations in recent years have highlighted the impact of HIV and AIDS on the education sector workforce in developing countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. High prevalence results in morbidity and mortality rates which deprive affected countries of some of their most educated and skilled human resources. In addition, teachers are often not trained or supported to deal with HIV in schools, and the disease has also affected the management capacity of education systems. In 2005, UNESCO joined the ILO in a collaborative project, aimed at the development of an HIV and AIDS workplace policy and related resource materials for use by education staff and stakeholders at national and institutional levels in southern African countries. The workshop in Maputo brought together representatives of government (ministries of labour and education), employer organizations and teacher/educator unions from seven countries to participate in this process, along with representatives of regional and international organizations (see Appendix 1 for list of participants). (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    313135

    HIV and AIDS and educator development, conduct, and support.

    Attawell K; Elder K

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 Mar. 37 p. (Good Policy and Practice in HIV and AIDS and Education Booklet No. 3; ED-2006/WS/4; cld 26006)

    UNESCO recognizes the significant impact of HIV and AIDS on international development, and in particular on progress towards achieving Education For All (EFA). As the UN agency with a mandate in education and a co-sponsor of the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV and AIDS (UNAIDS), UNESCO takes a comprehensive approach to HIV and AIDS. It recognizes that education can play a critical role in preventing future HIV infections and that one of its primary roles is to help learners and educators in formal and non-formal education systems to avoid infection. It also recognizes its responsibility to address and respond to the impact of the epidemic on formal and non-formal education systems, and the need to expand efforts to address issues related to care, treatment and support of those infected and affected by HIV. UNESCO's global strategy for responding to HIV and AIDS is guided by four key principles, and focuses on five core tasks. The guiding principles that are the foundation of UNESCO's response to HIV and AIDS are: Work towards expanding educational opportunities and the quality of education for all; A multi-pronged approach that addresses both risk (individual awareness and behaviour) and vulnerability (contextual factors); Promotion and protection of human rights, promotion of gender equality, and elimination of violence (notably violence against women), stigma and discrimination; An approach to prevention based on providing information that is scientifically sound, culturally appropriate, and effectively communicated, and helping learners and educators to develop the skills they need to prevent HIV infection and to tackle HIV and AIDS-related discrimination. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    313133

    Good policy and practice in HIV and AIDS and education. Booklet 1: Overview.

    Attawell K; Elder K

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 May. 24 p. (Good Policy and Practice in HIV and AIDS and Education Booklet No. 1; ED-2006/WS/2; cld 26002)

    HIV and AIDS affect the demand for, supply and quality of education. In some countries, the epidemic is reducing demand for education, as children become sick or are taken out of school and as fewer households are financially able to support their children?s education. However, it is difficult to generalize about the impact of HIV and AIDS on educational demand and important not to make assumptions about declining enrolments. Lack of accurate data on this question is a problem. For example, in Botswana absenteeism rates are relatively low in primary schools and there is some evidence to show that orphans have better attendance records than non-orphans. In Malawi and Uganda, where absenteeism is high among all primary school age students, there is less difference in school attendance between orphans and non-orphans than expected . (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    306843

    Education Sector Global HIV and AIDS Readiness Survey, 2004: policy implications for education and development. An integration of perspectives from ministries of education and civil society organizations.

    Badcock-Walters P; Boler T

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006. 64 p.

    This report documents the outcomes of the first international survey of education sector readiness to manage and mitigate the impact of HIV and AIDS. Ministries of education (MoEs) in 71 countries and civil society organizations in 18 countries were interviewed, in person and electronically, in separate research processes. Both surveys were conducted in 2004 on behalf of the UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on Education. The Global Readiness Survey (GRS) of 71 MoEs was conducted by the Mobile Task Team (MTT) on the Impact of HIV and AIDS on Education, and the Civil Society Survey (CSS) of 18 civil society country interactions was conducted by the Global Campaign for Education (GCE). It should be noted that the GRS research process involved the completion of the questionnaire by an internal committee of senior MoE officials convened for this purpose, independent of an external researcher. Thus the process generated what might be described as 'self-reported information' rather than data in a conventional sense; while this may have its limitations, it nevertheless provides an important insight into the internal perceptions and assumptions of the MoEs involved. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    306289

    The business of HIV / AIDS [editorial]

    Lancet. 2006 Aug 5; 368(9534):423.

    For the first time in its 183 year history, this week's issue of The Lancet is black and white and (RED) all over. The journal also contains, rather unusually, advertisements for a Motorola mobile phone, an American Express card, and clothing by GAP. This is because The Lancet has joined (PRODUCT) RED, which was launched at the World Economic Forum earlier this year to provide additional money for the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. This issue, devoted entirely to the predicament of HIV/ AIDS, coincides with the International AIDS Society meeting that will be held in Toronto, Aug 13--18; some of the papers included in the pages that follow will be presented at the conference. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    293768

    Thailand's child labor problem.

    Crossette B

    Interdependent. 2006 Summer; 4(2):23-26.

    Nam Phund, who is only 11, begins her work day at 3 am when the night's harvest of shrimp arrives, hours before dawn breaks over the Gulf of Thailand. That's when 13-year-old Fa goes to work, too. She doesn't know exactly how long she works, peeling shrimp for a seafood processing factory, but she says the day has come and gone and the sky is dark again when she goes home. Fa and Nam Phund can't tell time. They can't read. They are among the tens of thousands of migrant workers from Myanmar who have fled the political repression and economic meltdown of a country once known as Burma, and they are not entitled to an education in Thailand. Instead, they work beside their mothers, or alone, on their feet for 14 hours a day or more. The stories of migrant workers in Thailand would not be unfamiliar to Americans, because many of the factors that have brought poor Asians here, often in family groups, are similar to the conditions that propel Mexicans and others to cross the southern United States border. Prosperous Thailand is a magnet, drawing the poor and hopeless from neighboring Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar. The booming Thai seafood processing industry needs workers and will pay brokers--many of them no more than illegal traffickers--to find that labor. The reservoir is large. The migrants are willing to do the work Thais no longer want, in the fishing industry, in homes, agriculture and restaurants. Cambodians, in particular, are often turned into beggars on Bangkok streets, under the control of begging syndicates. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    303750

    We Care. Around the world.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. We Care

    New York, New York, UNDP, [2003]. 16 p.

    The 22 country offices where the We Care programme has been rolled out are taking great strides in making their workplaces truly AIDS competent. We are beginning to understand that HIV/AIDS is not 'out there' but among us -- and that if we are to make a difference in the way the world responds to it, WE MUST BEGIN WITH OURSELVES. Today, the We Care initiative is a global programme aiming at creating HIV/AIDS competence in all country offices, regional offices and headquarters by end of 2005. We Care is promoted together with initiatives spearheaded by other UN agencies, including 'Caring for Us' by UNICEF, the joint Access to Treatment and Inter-Organisational Needs (ACTION) programme facilitated by the UN Secretariat and the 'HIV/AIDS in the Workplace' initiative by WFP and ILO. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    303749

    We Care. What you and your family should know.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. We Care

    New York, New York, UNDP, [2003]. 16 p.

    We often assume that as UN employees, especially at Headquarters, we are somehow immune. Immune to being infected or affected by HIV/AIDS, immune from stigma and discrimination, immune from needing care, counselling, testing or treatment. But the truth is, we are as vulnerable as everyone else in society, and just like everyone else, we need to make informed decisions when it comes to HIV and AIDS. We need to be educated, we need to know how we can protect ourselves and how we can have a better quality of life if we happen to be living with HIV. We need to know that we have access to care and treatment and the right to confidentiality and non-discrimination in the workplace. In addition, as UN employees we have a special role to play. Before we can share with the world how HIV/AIDS should be addressed, we need to look into ourselves. Are we really that well informed, that sensitive? Can we talk openly to our co-workers about HIV/AIDS? Are we really sure that we will not be stigmatized if we happen to be living with HIV? Are we afraid of working closely with someone living with HIV? Do we discuss our anxieties and concerns within our families, with our partners, friends and co-workers? The We Care initiative addresses these issues. It helps us recognize that HIV/AIDS is not only 'out there' but also among us. And that if we are to create an environment that is empowering and respectful of the rights and responsibilities of every individual, we must first begin with ourselves. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    303028

    The business response to HIV / AIDS: impact and lessons learned.

    Daly K

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], 2000. [78] p.

    This publication follows on from the report "Business Response to HIV/AIDS: Innovation and Partnerships" published in 1997. With the increased knowledge and experience of business responses available today, there is a need to update the available statistical information, to provide further evidence of the need for action, and to document new case studies. Therefore, this report aims to provide assistance to business and associated partners in recognising the business case for further action against HIV/AIDS in the workplace and beyond. This is achieved through providing evidence of the impact that HIV/AIDS has on business activities and by highlighting the lessons learned from past and current responses. Guidance is provided in the form of policy tools, case studies and an examination of how to undertake successful partnerships in response to HIV/AIDS. This publication does not seek to provide standard models but tools to guide effective, efficient and needs-specific responses to HIV/AIDS. It is divided into five sections: A summary of the background information on HIV/AIDS, facts and trends, followed by a brief description of the response to date by the public and non-governmental sectors; A presentation of the impact that HIV/AIDS has on business, at the macroeconomic and individual company levels, providing the business case for early action against HIV/AIDS; An overview of the broad areas of activity by business in response to HIV/AIDS, with guidance on how to undertake HIV/AIDS policies and programmes; An examination of the factors that create and maintain successful partnerships in response to HIV/AIDS; The provision of 17 profiles of business activities in response to the disease, identifying the key lessons learned and providing models of good practice. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    295013

    Partnership with the private sector.

    Noehrenberg E

    World Health. 1998 Nov-Dec; 51(6):30.

    The private sector has an important role to play in the global, regional and national response to AIDS. It is in the private sector's own interest to actively combat the expanding epidemic because it affects employees, customers and others in their communities. By working in partnership with the public and nongovernmental sectors, companies can help to make their efforts more effective and bring benefits to all parties concerned. UNAIDS, the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS, is well aware that the fight against AIDS cannot succeed without a broad-based effort involving all members of society, including the private sector. An important part of the mission of UNAIDS is therefore to promote and brokers partnerships among the public, private and nongovernmental sectors of society that can help create a more coordinated, effective and sustainable response to HIV/AIDS. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    303300

    Access to treatment in the private-sector workplace: the provision of antiretroviral therapy by three companies in South Africa.

    Knight L

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], 2005 Jul. 47 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS/05.11E)

    The availability of antiretroviral therapy from 1996 onwards has made a huge impact on the lives of those people living with HIV who can afford the drugs. But most of the beneficiaries of the new drugs live in the world's high-income countries. For many of them, AIDS has become a manageable chronic condition rather than a death sentence. Affluent countries have seen a 70% decline in AIDS-related deaths since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy. In countries in which antiretroviral drugs are provided on a large scale (in Brazil, for example), the impact is remarkable. The number of hospital patients with AIDS is greatly reduced, people living with AIDS return to their families and jobs, and AIDS-related morbidity and mortality fall dramatically. However, for the huge majority of people living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries, it is a different story. Neither they nor their countries' health-care services can afford to annually pay the huge amounts of money that the drugs cost, even taking into account recent reductions in drug prices. Cost has not been the only barrier to wide-scale provision of antiretroviral therapy in low- and middle-income countries. Health experts have expressed concerns about providing drugs to large numbers of people in settings where health-care services do not even offer adequate basic care, let alone the support and monitoring needed for antiretroviral therapy. The slow progress in antiretroviral provision has meant that although five to six million people need antiretroviral therapy in low- and middle-income countries, only about 700 000 had access to it by the end of 2004. In sub-Saharan Africa, more than four million people need treatment, but only 310 000 had access by the end of 2004. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    303296

    Employers' handbook on HIV / AIDS: a guide for action.

    International Organisation of Employers; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2002 May. 39 p. (UNAIDS/02.17E)

    The HIV/AIDS epidemic has become a global crisis affecting all levels of society. Increasingly affected is the business world, which is suffering not only from the human cost to the workforce but also in terms of losses in profits and productivity that result in many new challenges for both employers and employees. Across the world, AIDS is having a direct and indirect impact on business. In southern Africa, for example, it is estimated that more than 20% of the economically active population in the 15--49-year-old age group are infected with HIV. In the workplace, employers are experiencing reduced productivity as a result of employee absenteeism and death. Consequently, employers are being challenged to manage the impact of HIV/AIDS in the workplace, which includes dealing with issues of stigma and discrimination, changing requirements for health-care benefits, training of replacement staff, and loss of skills and knowledge among employees. One of the missions of the International Organisation of Employers (IOE) is to facilitate the transfer of information and experience to employers' organizations in the social and labour fields. It is hoped that this Handbook will serve as a guide to employers' organizations and their members in their endeavours to mitigate the impact of HIV/AIDS on their companies and business environments. The Handbook outlines a framework for action by both employers' organizations and their members, providing examples of innovative responses to the pandemic by their counterparts in other parts of the world. Constructive and proactive responses to HIV in the workplace can lead to good industrial relations and uninterrupted production. The Handbook was elaborated with information provided by IOE members, sectoral associations and individual companies, as listed on the inside cover. Without the extra effort that they made to document initiatives in their countries and companies, this Handbook would not have been possible. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    303292

    HIV / AIDS and the workplace: forging innovative business responses. UNAIDS technical update.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1998 Jul. [9] p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS Technical Update)

    In the early years of the AIDS pandemic, little thought was given to the role that businesses might play in HIV prevention, and the workplace was not seen as a major venue for interventions. Since then, much has been learned about the pandemic and how it should be fought. and in particular that AIDS prevention and care are complex issues requiring a multisectoral approach. The business sector and its workplaces can play a key role in preventing the transmission of HIV, and in caring for and supporting those affected. As the impact of HIV on businesses becomes more visible, business leaders are increasingly seeing the advantages of creating HIV/AIDS programmes for their workplaces -- and, beyond the workplace, for their surrounding communities. (author's)
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  19. 19
    303290

    Putting HIV / AIDS on the business agenda: UNAIDS point of view.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1998 Nov. [8] p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS Point of View)

    For too long AIDS prevention and care was pitched to business on health terms by health experts, on the basis that 'dealing with AIDS in the workplace is good for workers'. Initially perceived as a health problem, the health sector was at the forefront of epidemic control efforts. Experience now shows that both management and workers have a stake in the battle against AIDS and that all sectors need to be engaged right at the outset. Unquestionably, in the overall workplace context, management's response is a key element in shaping the level and quality of company interventions. To mobilize the corporate sector's participation in a major way, management must be included as a stakeholder from the planning stage to implementation. Thailand has been relatively successful in drawing support from business, even though this initiative came at a late stage in the development of the epidemic. Thailand's success is based on continuing and determined efforts by the National AIDS Programme and nongovernmental organizations to create opportunities for key business leaders to contribute in a strategic and substantial fashion. Those in the business sector need to be convinced that their participation is essential in making a difference, not only to the larger national endeavour, but also to their businesses. (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    300909

    Report on the global HIV / AIDS epidemic, July 2002.

    Marais H; Wilson A

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], 2002 Jul. 226 p. (UNAIDS/02.26E)

    In the past two years, the sense of common purpose in the worldwide struggle against HIV/AIDS has intensified. More than at any other time in the short history of the epidemic, the need to translate local and national examples of success into a global movement has become manifest. The political momentum to tackle AIDS has grown. Public opinion in many countries has been mobilized by the media, nongovernmental organizations, activists, doctors, economists, and people living with HIV/AIDS. Communities and nations are progressively taking the lead in responding to the epidemic with increased political commitment, resources and institutional initiatives. But this new political resolve is not universal. An unacceptable number of governments and civil society institutions are still in a state of denial about the HIV/AIDS epidemic, and are failing to act to prevent its further spread or alleviate its impact. By failing to act, governments and civil society are turning their backs on the possibility of success against AIDS. Where the moment of action has been seized, there is mounting evidence of inroads being made against the epidemic. Alongside the familiar achievements of Senegal, Thailand and Uganda, there are new successes on every continent. Despite emerging from genocide and conflict, Cambodia responded to the threat of HIV in the mid-1990s and has achieved marked declines in both the levels of HIV and the high-risk behaviours associated with its transmission. The infection rate among pregnant women in Cambodia declined by almost a third between 1997 and 2000. The Philippines has acted early to forestall the epidemic, keeping HIV rates low with strong prevention efforts and the mobilization of community and business organizations. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    300182

    Draft joint ILO / WHO guidelines on health services and HIV / AIDS.

    International Labour Organization [ILO]; World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, ILO, 2005. 60 p. (TMEHS/2005)

    These guidelines are the product of collaboration between the International Labour Organization and the World Health Organization. In view of their complementary mandates, long-standing and close cooperation in the area of occupational health, and their more recent partnership as co-sponsors of UNAIDS, the ILO and the WHO decided to join forces in order to assist health services in building their capacities to provide their workers with a safe, healthy and decent working environment, as the most effective way both to reduce transmission of HIV and other blood-borne viruses and to improve the delivery of care to patients. This is essential when health service workers have not only to deliver normal health-care services but also to provide HIV/AIDS services and manage the long-term administration and monitoring of anti-retroviral treatments (ART) at a time when, in many countries, they are themselves decimated by the epidemic. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    297499

    Towards an AIDS-free generation. The Global Initiative on HIV / AIDS and Education. Briefs for decision-makers.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; UNESCO. International Institute for Educational Planning

    Paris, France, UNESCO, International Institute for Educational Planning, IIEP Publications, 2005 May. [62] p. (IIEP/May 2005/HIV-GI/02.R2)

    What is the global initiative on HIV/AIDS and Education? The Cosponsoring Organizations of UNAIDS launched the Global Initiative on HIV/AIDS and Education in March 2004. This initiative aims to radically enhance national responses against the epidemic by helping governments to implement comprehensive, nation-wide education programmes for young people. The partners in the Global Initiative are united by a commitment to implement a jointly developed framework on HIV/AIDS and Education. The Global Initiative is designed: To complement and link with the "3 by 5" Initiative to scale up treatment against AIDS; To be part of the broader prevention effort spearheaded by UNAIDS; To facilitate the implementation of the so-called "Three ones" at the country level: One agreed HIV/AIDS Action Framework that provides the basis for coordinating the work of all partners; One National AIDS Coordinating Authority, with a broad-based multisectoral mandate; One agreed country-level Monitoring and Evaluation System. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    292975

    The long and winding road towards a tobacco-free world [editorial]

    Lancet. 2005 Nov 5; 366(9497):1586.

    Next week, on Nov 8, an important deadline for ratifying the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) approaches. Any country that has not ratified the convention by then will not become a full party to its governing body, which will meet for the first time at the Conference of the Parties in Geneva, Feb 6–17, next year. At that meeting parties will take decisions on technical, procedural, and financial issues relating to the implementation of the convention. The FCTC has been rightly hailed as a milestone for the promotion of public health worldwide and WHO can be proud of its achievement. So far, 94 countries have ratified the FCTC, 41 of these in 2005, with China, Rwanda, Nigeria, Cyprus, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo becoming the latest nations to do so this October. China, with the world’s largest cigarette market and with an estimated 350 million smokers, is a particularly important signatory. By ratifying the FCTC, China has taken an important and welcome step to protect its people’s health. Rapid economic changes make China’s large population especially vulnerable to a future epidemic of chronic diseases. (excerpt)
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  24. 24
    290936

    Joint ILO / WHO guidelines on health services and HIV / AIDS. Tripartite Meeting of Experts to Develop Joint ILO / WHO Guidelines on Health Services and HIV / AIDS.

    International Labour Organisation [ILO]; World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, ILO, 2005. [65] p. (TMEHS/2005/8)

    These guidelines are the product of collaboration between the International Labour Organization and the World Health Organization. In view of their complementary mandates, their long-standing and close cooperation in the area of occupational health, and their more recent partnership as co-sponsors of UNAIDS, the ILO and the WHO decided to join forces in order to assist health services in building their capacities to provide their workers with a safe, healthy and decent working environment, as the most effective way both to reduce transmission of HIV and other blood-borne pathogens and to improve the delivery of care to patients. This is essential when health service workers have not only to deliver normal health-care services but also to provide HIV/AIDS services and manage the long-term administration and monitoring of anti-retroviral treatments (ART) at a time when, in many countries, they are themselves decimated by the epidemic. (excerpt)
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  25. 25
    275928

    Business and HIV / AIDS: a global snapshot. International AIDS Economics Network.

    Boldrini F; DeYoung P; Taylor K

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Economic Forum, Global Health Initiative, 2004 Jul 9. [12] p.

    Who is the world economic forum? An independent international non- profit organisation committed to improving the state of the world; Corporate members from the world's leading 1000 companies; Collaborative framework for the world's leaders to address global issues. Business and HIV/AIDS Why look at a business response? What models for business engagement? What do we know? What don't we know? (excerpt)
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