Your search found 35 Results

  1. 1
    374612

    Making social protection gender-responsive: lessons from UN Women’s work in the Eastern Caribbean.

    United Nations. UN Women

    New York, New York, UN Women, [2017]. 4 p. (Policy Brief No. 7)

    There is broad-based agreement today that universal social protection systems are a desirable goal. For gender equality advocates, it is paramount to take advantage of this momentum to ensure that such systems benefit women by responding to their rights and needs. Well-designed social protection systems can narrow gender gaps in poverty rates, enhance women’s income security and access to personal income, and provide a lifeline for poor women, especially single mothers.1 The current context of economic stagnation and fiscal adjustment, however, places big constraints on the investments needed to achieve these goals. How can gender equality advocates engage with social protection advocacy in this context? This policy brief showcases the strategies that were used by UN Women’s Multi-Country Office in the Caribbean to promote gender-responsive social protection in a context where reforms have been driven mainly by efforts to reduce public debt and promote economic competitiveness.
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  2. 2
    374611

    ‘Leaving no one behind’ in action: observations from FGE’sseven-year experience working with civil society.

    United Nations. UN Women. Fund for Gender Equality [FGE]

    New York, New York, UN Women, [2017]. 8 p.

    This brief contains observations from the Fund for Gender Equality’s (FGE) seven-year experience working with civil society. Gender equality is at the forefront of the 2030 Development Agenda. The Sustainable Development Goals include a stand-alone goal to advance equality, and gender-related targets mainstreamed across the Global Goals. If something has opened a door for drastic progress in the lives of women and girls worldwide, it is the principle of leaving no one behind. Leaving no one behind means prioritizing human beings’ dignity and placing the progress of the most marginalized communities first—women and girls being all too often at the top of the list. It urges us to address the structural causes of inequality and marginalization that affect them. This ambitious undertaking requires a collective effort to identify and share effective strategies to operationalize this concept. This brief offers practical insights based on the experience of the FGE in working with marginalized populations through its support to women-led civil society organizations (CSOs).
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  3. 3
    374326

    10 essentials for prevention of violence against women.

    United Nations. UN Women

    2016 Nov; New York, New York, UN Women, 2016 Nov. 2 p.

    Violence against women and girls is one of the most universal and pervasive human rights violations in the world, of pandemic proportions, with country data showing that about one third of women in the world report experiencing physical or sexual violence at some point in their lifetime, mainly by their partners. UN Women provides knowledge-based policy and programming guidance to a diverse array of stakeholders at international, regional and country levels often partnering with other UN agencies and stakeholders. UN Women’s work is broadly focused on a comprehensive approach to ending violence against women and girls that addresses legislation and policies, prevention, services for survivors, research and data. The briefs included in this package aim to summarize in a concise and friendly way, for advocates, programmers and policy makers, the essential strategies for addressing violence against women in general, for preventing violence and providing services to survivors in particular.
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  4. 4
    374325

    10 essentials for addressing violence against women.

    United Nations. UN Women

    2016 Nov; New York, New York, UN Women, 2016 Nov. 2 p.

    Violence against women and girls is one of the most universal and pervasive human rights violations in the world, of pandemic proportions, with country data showing that about one third of women in the world report experiencing physical or sexual violence at some point in their lifetime, mainly by their partners. UN Women provides knowledge-based policy and programming guidance to a diverse array of stakeholders at international, regional and country levels often partnering with other UN agencies and stakeholders. UN Women’s work is broadly focused on a comprehensive approach to ending violence against women and girls that addresses legislation and policies, prevention, services for survivors, research and data. The briefs included in this package aim to summarize in a concise and friendly way, for advocates, programmers and policy makers, the essential strategies for addressing violence against women in general, for preventing violence and providing services to survivors in particular.
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  5. 5
    374323

    Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) for Youth.

    Khanna P; Kimmel Z; Karkara R

    2016 Dec; New York, New York, UN Women, 2016 Dec. 20 p.

    The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) is an international legal instrument that requires countries to eliminate discrimination against women and girls in all areas and promotes women’s and girls’ equal rights. CEDAW is often described as the international bill of rights for women, and is one of the key international agreements that guides the work of UN Women in achieving gender equality and empowering all women and girls. CEDAW for Youth is a youth-friendly version of CEDAW, that was authored by a young woman and young man. This resource explains why CEDAW is important to youth, describes CEDAW’s impact in advancing gender equality and human rights for women and girls around the world, and summarizes the articles of CEDAW, including the specific forms of discrimination that must be ended and how CEDAW is implemented and monitored.
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  6. 6
    372997

    Being a woman in Côte d'Ivoire: empowerment challenges.

    Kraidy AA; Noubissié EN; Sid’Ahmed TO

    Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, World Bank, 2013 Jun. 19 p.

    In Africa, women are subjected to discriminatory practices that keep them in a vulnerable situation. Their limited access to land, in a continent where the majority of the population depends on agriculture, reduces their access to credit and their capacity to undertake sustainable economic activities to generate income. They hold only 18 percent of agricultural lands and are not better off in administrations. In Cote d'Ivoire, the woman remains marginalized, with a status that is increasingly weakened today by the socio-political situation. Data from the National Statistics Institute highlight their extreme poverty: 75 percent of rural women are living below the poverty line. And they are often deprived of basic social services. Some socio-cultural factors perpetuate traditions that are harmful to girls and women. This report is the culmination of the process initiated by the World Bank as part of the establishment of its program of strengthening the role of women in Ivorian society. It reports summary proposals from the various consultations held both nationally and regionally. Designed in a participatory and decentralized approach, these consultations have made it possible to gather factual and contextual data on the four (04) themes selected for the workshops, as well as proposals that, if translated into actions, would help develop an action plan. This is, and it must be stressed, a study that has the merit of giving the floor directly to hundreds of Ivorian women from all socio-professional categories to develop themselves a roadmap based on their own daily experiences.
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  7. 7
    372763

    Evaluation of the UNFPA support to family planning 2008-2013. Evaluation Brief.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, Evaluation Office, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2016. 24 p.

    This evaluation focuses on how UNFPA performed in the area of family planning during the period covered by the UNFPA Strategic Plan 2008-2013. It provides valuable insights and learning which can be used to inform the current UNFPA family planning strategy as well as other relevant programmes, including UNFPA Supplies (2013-2020). All the countries where UNFPA works in family planning were included, but the evaluation focuses on the 69 priority countries identified in the 2012 London Summit on Family Planning as having low rates of contraceptive use and high unmet needs. The evaluation took place in 2014-2016 and was conducted by Euro Health Group in collaboration with the Royal Tropical Institute Netherlands. It involved a multidisciplinary team of senior evaluators and family planning and sexual and reproductive health and rights specialists, which was supervised and guided by the Evaluation Office in consultation with the Evaluation Reference Group. The outputs include a thematic evaluation report, an evaluation brief and country case study notes for Bolivia, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Ethiopia and Zimbabwe.
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  8. 8
    335016

    A transformative stand-alone goal on achieving gender equality, women's rights and women's empowerment: Imperatives and key components. In the context of the post-2015 development framework and sustainable development goals.

    United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women [UN Women]

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2013 Jun. [48] p.

    UN Women has launched a new paper to contribute to the ongoing debate on the post-2015 development agenda. In the paper, UN Women lays out its vision for a transformative framework that addresses the structural impediments to gender equality and the achievement of women’s rights.
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  9. 9
    357009

    Banking on health: World Bank and African Development Bank spending on reproductive health and HIV / AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Lauterbach C

    Washington, D.C., Gender Action, 2012. [65] p.

    This report reviews the health (2006 - 2012) expenditures of the World Bank and African Development Bank. It challenges their priorities and provides recommendations for increasing their involvement to address reproductive health and HIV / AIDS in sub-Saharan African countries. It suggests that improving health care systems as a whole, particularly reproductive health and HIV / AIDS, will go a long way in ensuring access to reproductive and sexual health for all, especially women.
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  10. 10
    333729

    Keeping the momentum. One year in the life of the UN Human Rights Council.

    de Rivero J

    New York, New York, Human Rights Watch, 2011. [89] p.

    Five years after its creation, the UN Human Rights Council began shaking off its reluctance to engage on “country situations” by taking concrete steps to respond to several human rights crises across the globe. From July 2010 through June 2011, the Council established commissions of inquiry on Libya and Côte d’Ivoire, appointed an expert to investigate the human rights situation in Iran, and spoke out after years of silence on the human rights situation in Belarus. It responded quickly and helpfully to the Arab Spring in some countries (Libya, Syria, Tunisia), but ignored entirely developments in Bahrain. Keeping the Momentum highlights the main achievements of the Council in the past year, while noting the serious human rights situations that the Council failed to address. By taking a close look at the performance of 27 states that have played an influential role at the Council, the report shows how a small number of states have moved the Council from being a passive spectator to engaging actively in a manner that shapes human rights on the ground. And it describes how some states have sought to derail that progress. The report examines ways to consolidate and build on that progress to the benefit of all those facing human rights abuse. Human Rights Watch challenges states to live up to the Council’s clear mandate: to promote and protect the human rights of people throughout the world.
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  11. 11
    351774
    Peer Reviewed

    Perpetuating power: a response.

    Ortiz Ortega A

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2011 Nov; 19(38):35-41.

    This paper explores the actors who replaced the agreements about the global development agenda made in the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo 1994 and the 4th UN World Women's Conference in Beijing in 1995 with the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It also surveys the processes which shape and affect the exercise of power, which can lead to radical changes.
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  12. 12
    333442

    World development report 2012. Gender equality and development.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2011. [458] p.

    The lives of girls and women have changed dramatically over the past quarter century. The pace of change has been astonishing in some areas, but in others, progress toward gender equality has been limited -- even in developed countries. This year's World Development Report: Gender Equality and Development argues that gender equality is a core development objective in its own right. It is also smart economics. Greater gender equality can enhance productivity, improve development outcomes for the next generation, and make institutions more representative. The Report also focuses on four priority areas for policy going forward: (i) reducing excess female mortality and closing education gaps where they remain, (ii) improving access to economic opportunities for women, (iii) increasing women's voice and agency in the household and in society, and (iv) limiting the reproduction of gender inequality across generations.
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  13. 13
    333188

    Progress of the world's women, 2011-2012. In pursuit of justice.

    Turquet L

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2011. [168] p.

    On 6 July 2011, the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) launched their flagship report, entitled "Progress of the World's Women 2011-2012: In Pursuit of Justice." The past century has seen a transformation in women's legal rights, with countries all over the world expanding the scope of women's legal entitlements. However, for millions of women worldwide, the laws that exist on paper do not translate into equality and justice. The report, aimed at policymakers and gender equality advocates, illustrates the ways to reform and create new models for justice services that meet women's needs. It emphasizes the importance of well-functioning legal and justice systems to overcome prevalent inadequate laws and implementation gaps that undermine gender equality. The four broad findings of the report are i) laws matter; ii) implementation matters; iii) the infrastructure of justice matters; and iv) women's empowerment matters. Ten groundbreaking cases relating to gender equality are presented in the report to illustrate how women increasingly use international courts, the role of the use of strategic litigation, how a court can hold the government responsible and the usage of a framework of transformative reparations. As concluding remarks, the report suggests ten recommendations, aiming to enhance women's access to justice and the promotion of gender equality: 1. Support women's legal organizations; 2. Support one-stop shops and specialized services to reduce attrition in the justice chain; 3. Implement gender-sensitive law reform; 4. Use quotas to boost the number of women legislators; 5. Put women on the front line of law enforcement; 6. Train judges and monitor decisions; 7. Increase women's access to courts and truth commissions in conflict and post-conflict contexts; 8. Implement gender-responsive reparations programmes; 9. Invest in women's access to justice; 10. Put gender equality at the heart of the Millennium Development Goals.
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  14. 14
    331402

    Summary report of the Expert Group Consultation on Tracking and Monitoring Gender Equality and HIV / AIDS in Aid Effectiveness.

    Expert Group Consultation on Tracking and Monitoring Gender Equality and HIV in Aid Effectiveness (2008: Santo Domingo)

    In: Making aid more effective: Promoting better monitoring and tracking of gender equality in HIV and AIDS responses, edited by Robert Carr. New York, New York, United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM], 2008. 23-32.

    This chapter presents document highlights from an Expert Group Consultation convened by UNIFEM in collaboration with the European Commission to identify approaches to ensure that the aid effectiveness agenda promotes greater action on, and investment in, reducing HIV and AIDS among women. The consultation provided an opportunity to discuss how to make aid more effective in addressing the gender dimensions of the epidemic through the tracking of financing for gender equality in the response to HIV and identifying, reviewing and refining key programme indicators. Experts examined how and where gender equality and HIV are being woven into the aid effectiveness agenda, drawing on country examples and existing efforts. They also made recommendations for advocacy to ensure that aid is 'effective' for women. More importantly, this convening of experts provided an opportunity to examine strategies and tools to support nationally driven processes of tracking and monitoring progress to reduce HIV infections among women by improving their access to sexual and reproductive health and rights and by reducing violence they face. (Excerpt)
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  15. 15
    331397

    Making aid more effective: Promoting better monitoring and tracking of gender equality in HIV and AIDS responses.

    Carr R

    New York, New York, United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM], 2008. 81 p.

    In May 2008, UNIFEM and the EC organized an expert consultation on 'Tracking and Monitoring Gender Equality and HIV / AIDS in Aid Effectiveness,' to identify and promote approaches to ensure that the aid effectiveness agenda promotes greater investment and action on reducing HIV / AIDS among women and girls. Participants developed recommendations for integrating the gender equality dimensions of HIV / AIDS into national development planning, implementation and budgeting; for strengthening current indicators for monitoring and tracking progress to eliminate violence against women and improve women's access to sexual and reproductive health and rights in the context of HIV / AIDS; and for inspiring new areas of advocacy and new entry points for improving knowledge and awareness on gender equality and HIV and AIDS in the context of aid effectiveness. This publication presents the key findings of the consultation; it highlights the gaps in tracking budgets and expenditures on gender equality, and the need to transform the structural conditions that heighten the vulnerability of women and girls to HIV. It underlines the need for comprehensive gender equality indicators for use in monitoring progress in meeting key targets and goals outlined within the United Nations Declaration of Commitment on HIV / AIDS. (Excerpt)
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  16. 16
    331354

    Gender snapshot. UNFPA programming at work.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, Technical Division, Gender, Human Rights and Culture Branch, 2008. 27 p.

    This booklet provides a snapshot of UNFPA's programming efforts to advance gender equality and empower women. It reports on activities undertaken in various priority areas like empowerment, reproductive health, youth and adolescent, conflict and emergency situations, etc. The report is based on contributions from the global, regional and country levels over the course of two years (2007-2008).
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  17. 17
    327742

    Female genital mutilation. Agenda item 11.8.

    World Health Assembly (61st: 2008: Geneva)

    [Geneva, Switzerland], World Health Assembly, 2008 May 24. 3 p. (WHA61.16; A61/VR/8)

    This document presents the text of the Sixty-first World Health Assembly agenda item on female genital mutilation.
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  18. 18
    327135

    Integrating the human rights of women throughout the United Nations system. Commission on Human Rights resolution 2002/50.

    United Nations. Commission on Human Rights

    [Geneva, Switzerland], United Nations, Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, 2002. 5 p. (E/CN.4/RES/2002/50)

    Reaffirming that the equal rights of women and men are enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women and other international human rights instruments. Recalling all previous resolutions on this subject. Recalling also the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action adopted in June 1993 by the World Conference on Human Rights (A/CONF.157/23) which affirms that the human rights of women and of the girl child are an inalienable, integral and indivisible part of universal human rights and calls for action to integrate the equal status and human rights of women into the mainstream of United Nations activity system-wide. Welcoming the increased integration of a gender perspective into the work of all entities of the United Nations and the major United Nations conferences, special sessions and summits, such as the special session of the General Assembly on human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and the World Conference against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance and their integrated and coordinated follow-up. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    327186
    Peer Reviewed

    Legal aspects of conflict-induced migration by women.

    Macklin A

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2008 May; 16(31):22-32.

    This paper surveys the international legal frameworks, including the many guidelines, handbooks, resolutions, toolkits, conclusions and manuals produced by various United Nations bodies, that confirm an awareness of the protection issues specific to women and girls displaced by conflict. It explores the extent to which these documents address the gendered impacts of conflict-induced migration, and the role of United Nations bodies as international governmental organisations in implementing these norms. The main focus is upon internally displaced women and women refugees. In addition to problems of enforcing compliance with existing guidelines, the paper concludes that two areas - developing strategies to accommodate the realities of long-term, even permanent displacement and enhancing women's literal and legal literacy - require much greater attention on the part of governmental and non-governmental international organisations. (author's)
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  20. 20
    325645

    Integration of the human rights of women and the gender perspective. Violence against women.

    United Nations. Commission on Human Rights

    [New York, New York], United Nations, Economic and Social Council, 2003 Jan 6. 24 p. (E/CN.4/2003/75)

    Since the creation of the mandate on violence against women, its causes and consequences, in 1994 the world has achieved greater awareness and understanding of gender-based violence, and more effective measures are being developed to confront the problem. The international community has made great strides in setting standards and elaborating a legal framework for the promotion and protection of women from violence. While at the normative level the needs of women are generally adequately addressed, the challenge lies in ensuring respect for and effective implementation of existing law and standards. Much more remains to be done to create and sustain an environment where women can truly live free from gender-based violence. The report documents key developments at the international, regional and national levels. The Special Rapporteur welcomes the many efforts at standard-setting and norm creation at the international level and the array of activities and initiatives taken by States aimed at the elimination of violence against women, including the adoption of amendments to relevant laws, and educational, social and other measures, including national information and awareness-raising campaigns. In addition to the existence of laws, mechanisms for enforcing rights and redressing violations are also of crucial importance. Recent developments at the national, regional and international levels, in the prosecution of those responsible for violence against women are very important steps in the fight against impunity, not only because the perpetrators are brought to justice, but also because of the general deterrent effect such developments will hopefully have. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    325631

    Beijing betrayed. Women worldwide report that governments have failed to turn the Platform into Action.

    Zeitlin J; Frankson JR; Valenti J; Grossman A; Johnson N

    New York, New York, Women's Environment and Development Organization [WEDO], 2005. 207 p.

    Beijing Betrayed is the fifth global monitoring report published by the Women's Environment and Development Organization (WEDO) assessing governments' progress in implementing the commitments they made to the world's women at the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing, 1995. Beijing Betrayed brings together the diverse voices of women in some 150 countries in subregions across Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe and North America, Latin America and the Caribbean and West Asia to influence the United Nations 10 Year Review of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action. This report presents women's realities - their concerns, experiences, perspectives and analyses - in the implementation process and contrasts sharply with the more formal and often abstract reports governments have presented. The reports presented here are a testimony to women as agents of change and give us cause for celebration. They show that women advocates everywhere have stepped up their activities since Beijing using the Platform for Action and other key global policy instruments to push governments into taking action. In every region of the world, women have taken the lead in crafting legislation and conducting public awareness activities to promote women's human rights, peace, and sustainable development. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    325496

    Eliminating female genital mutilation: an interagency statement. OHCHR, UNAIDS, UNDP, UNECA, UNESCO, UNFPA, UNHCR, UNICEF, UNIFEM, WHO.

    United Nations. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights [OHCHR]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]; United Nations. Economic Commission for Africa; UNESCO

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2008. 41 p.

    The term 'female genital mutilation' (also called 'female genital cutting' and 'female genital mutilation/cutting') refers to all procedures involving partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. Between 100 and 140 million girls and women in the world are estimated to have undergone such procedures, and 3 million girls are estimated to be at risk of undergoing the procedures every year. Female genital mutilation has been reported to occur in all parts of the world, but it is most prevalent in: the western, eastern, and north-eastern regions of Africa, some countries in Asia and the Middle East and among certain immigrant communities in North America and Europe. Female genital mutilation has no known health benefits. On the contrary, it is known to be harmful to girls and women in many ways. First and foremost, it is painful and traumatic. The removal of or damage to healthy, normal genital tissue interferes with the natural functioning of the body and causes several immediate and long-term health consequences. For example, babies born to women who have undergone female genital mutilation suffer a higher rate of neonatal death compared with babies born to women who have not undergone the procedure. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    323794

    A case study of women's education within the Moroccan development model.

    Marrakchi NL

    Journal of North African Studies. 2008 Mar; 13(1):55-73.

    This paper examines the current efforts being made in Morocco in the field of women's education and evaluates the success of the Moroccan Development Model in the field of women's education by examining the topic through three lenses: international aid agencies, Moroccan government and royal efforts and the Moroccan Women's Movement. Consideration of the historical, religious and economic frameworks for each actor maintains priority within the study as a means of evaluating the progress made to date, the current status of women's education and the long-term goals and timeframes. The findings within this paper are primarily based on UN statistics, ratings, and definitions as well as other reputable sources such as the World Bank. Sources used include magazine articles, websites, academic journals and papers, and sociological, political and anthropological books on Morocco and women. It must be noted that this evaluation focuses on Anglophone and Francophone sources only and does not consider Arabophone sources. (author's)
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  24. 24
    322445

    Millennium Development Goals and streamlining the UN development architectures.

    Fues T

    International Studies. 2007; 44(1):23-37.

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) exemplify the enduring commitment and potential of the United Nations to serve as a catalyst for collective action in the cause of equitable and all round development of all nations and peoples. Indeed, the restructuring of the development apparatus as an important element of the larger challenge of the UN reform has acquired greater urgency in view of the manifest need to push for timely implementation of MDGs. Strengthening the role of the Economic and Social Council is a tricky issue that apparently puts the industrially advanced countries and the developing countries in opposite camps. Among the issues on which both the European developed and the Asian developing countries have showed interest, the idea of air ticket levy for raising resources for development is worthy of being pursued vigorously as part of the UN reform negotiations. Likewise, there is more than sufficient potential for old European Union countries like Germany and fast developing countries like China to bridge gaps in their policy objectives and work as partners in strengthening the multilateral mechanism dedicated to development purposes. (author's)
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  25. 25
    321706

    Is gender justice a priority for the UN and what more is needed for a coordinated institutional approach?

    Salah R

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 7 p.

    The challenge for us in the United Nations system is how to work with our international and local partners to undertake national reconstruction using a human rights based approach, to enable a transition to rule of rights, not a continuation of rule of abuse. We must develop a common approach to ensure that war-torn societies are rebuilt in such a way that nondiscrimination, and a total respect for rights, particularly those of girls and women, can be used to develop constitutions, legal frameworks, justice and security systems underpinned by the primacy of equal enjoyment of rights. UNICEF is currently covering a range of activities from the overall umbrella of child protection, including issues of child soldiers and DDR, mine action, juvenile justice, and international accountability for crimes against children to broader humanitarian survival issues such as health, nutrition and education. With its rights-based approach to policy development and programme implementation, UNICEF is strategicallyplaced to uphold the pre-eminence of the rights of women and girls and to work with partners to address gender justice issues at field level. (excerpt)
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