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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    316466

    Mapping of experiences of access to care, treatment and support -- Tanzania.

    Rwechungura L; Kayitare F

    London, England, International Community of Women Living with HIV / AIDS, 2006. [6] p.

    WHO supported ICW to map positive women's experiences of access to care and treatment in three countries - Namibia, Kenya and Tanzania. The findings will contribute to advocacy for increased political support and resources to address gendered barriers to care, treatment and support. The project complements a mapping and database of civil society organizations (CSOs) providing treatment by the French consortium - SIDACTION. This mapping presents results from three focus group discussions with HIV positive women conducted in two districts of Tanzania - Arusha and Moshi (2006). Women who participated in these focus group discussions were aged between 30 to 45. Most of them came from villages Munduli (Arusha) and Seliani (Moshi). Three focus groups were also conducted with men only in Arusha. A mixed-sex focus group was conducted in Chalinze in the Bagamoyo district (Dar es Salaam coastal area) with men and women aged between 35 and 42. There were between 12 - 15 participants in each group in Arusha and Mosh. However, in Chalinze there were only 8 people. Results from the mixed sex and men only focus groups are presented here but the main emphasis is on the results from the women only focus groups. Medical personnel were also interviewed and their experiences are included. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    316465

    Mapping of experiences of access to care, treatment and support -- Kenya.

    Webi E

    London, England, International Community of Women Living with HIV / AIDS, 2006. [4] p.

    Namibia, Kenya and Tanzania. The findings will contribute to advocacy for increased political support and resources to address gendered barriers to care, treatment and support. The project complements a mapping and database of civil society organizations (CSOs) providing treatment by the French consortium - SIDACTION. The research was carried out in Homabay (rural) and Kibera community (urban) involving women and men living with HIV and AIDS (13th December 2005 - 31st January 2006). Data was gathered through questionnaires and focus group discussions (FGDs). Women who participated in the focus group discussions were aged between 22 - 45 years old and in total 100 people took part in the project, including questionnaire respondents. The service providers in both sites were of varied age group (28-45 years) and both female and male service providers participated in the focus group discussions. Results from the mixed sex and service provider focus groups are presented here but the main emphasis is onthe results from the women only focus groups. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    131647

    Planning for a multi-site study of health careseeking behavior in relation to IMCI, November 4-11, 1997.

    Bhattacharyya K; Burkhalter BR

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival [BASICS], 1997. [8] p. (Report; USAID Contract No. HRN-C-00-93-00031-00)

    This trip report pertains to a 1-week workshop held during November 4-11, 1997. The purpose of the workshop was to plan a study of healthcare-seeking behavior in Mexico, Ghana, and Sri Lanka. The study would develop a community and facility link as part of the WHO Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI) initiative. The theoretical framework identifies four types of maternal behavior (recognition, labeling, resorting to care, and compliance) and four types of channels (paid community health workers, volunteer health workers, mother support groups, and informal support from family and others). Project funding would be supplied by WHO. BASICS has the opportunity to collaborate with WHO and the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine on the study, which is highly relevant to its work with behavior change and IMCI. The workshop was attended by about 18 persons and included teams from the three study sites. The workshop included presentations, plenary discussions, and small group sessions. The organizing committee prepared a review of the literature on healthcare-seeking behavior, evaluation techniques, WHO protocols for multi-center studies, targets, and budgets. Representatives from the sites prepared an overview of health conditions at their sites and some ideas for the study plan and intervention. The subgroups developed specific draft study plans, which were presented to the plenary. Final proposals are due in Geneva by November 30, 1998. BASICS will develop a review of mother support groups and provide position papers to sites.
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  4. 4
    095596

    Exploring new paths to service delivery in Palestine.

    PLANNED PARENTHOOD CHALLENGES. 1994; (1):28-30.

    From 1963 to 1987, the Palestinian Family Planning (FP) and Protection Association (FPA) set up 11 urban clinics and branches. As the result of a needs survey in 1985, the FPA was planning to provide more services in rural areas. The political situation and the 1987 start of the Intifada, however, made delivery of even existing services more difficult and helped create a pronatalist atmosphere which was fueled by religious opposition to FP. In order to continue its work, the FPA took advantage of interagency cooperation with the nongovernmental organizations which had existing health clinics and which agreed to provide contraceptives in exchange for a percentage of the sales revenue. The role of the FPA was to provide the supplies and to train staff in service provision. The FPA also used this cooperative system to funnel FP information, education, and communication to women's groups. Through these efforts the FPA reached 60% more new clients in 1992 than it had in 1991. This successful cooperative method had its roots in the efforts the FPA had made since the 1970s to provide FP services in the maternal and child care clinics for refugees set up by the UN Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA). In 1993, the FPA received funding to open its own clinic in Gaza (where 75% of the people are refugees). The FPA is also actively seeking the involvement of religious leaders in discussions about the incorporation of FP in refugee health programs. Meanwhile, in 1990, the UNRWA began to offer FP as part of its maternal health program and to refer clients to the FPA where they were served free of charge. When the UNRWA began to provide FP services directly, the FPA provided the training for the UNRWA personnel. By remaining flexible, the FPA has been able to use appropriate channels to deliver its own expertise to women in need. Creative new approaches will continue to be called for to reach the thousands of women who remain in need of FP services.
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