Your search found 242 Results

  1. 1
    374799

    Achieving a future without child marriage: focus on West and Central Africa.

    UNICEF. Division of Data Research and Policy. Data and Analytics Section

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2017. 6 p.

    West and Central Africa faces a unique set of challenges in its efforts to reduce the impact of child marriage – a high prevalence and slow rate of decline combined with a growing population of girls. This statistical snapshot showcases the latest data and puts forward recommendations on policy and actions to eliminate this practice.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    323525

    State of world population 2017. Worlds apart: Reproductive health and rights in an age of inequality.

    Diaz MM; Engelman R; Klugman J; Luchsinger G; Shaw E

    New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], Division of Communications and Strategic Partnerships, 2017. 140 p.

    In most developing countries, the poorest women have the fewest options for family planning, the least access to antenatal care and are most likely to give birth without the assistance of a doctor or midwife. Limited access to family planning translates into 89 million unintended pregnancies and 48 million abortions in developing countries annually. This does not only harm women’s health, but also restricts their ability to join or stay in the paid labour force and move towards financial independence, the report argues. Lack of access to related services, such as affordable child care, also stops women from seeking jobs outside the home. For women who are in the labour force, the absence of paid maternity leave and employers’ discrimination against those who become pregnant amount to a motherhood penalty, forcing many women to choose between a career and parenthood. The UNFPA report recommends focusing on the furthest behind first, in line with the United Nations blueprint for achieving sustainable development and inclusive societies by 2030. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development has “envisaged a better future, one where we collectively tear down the barriers and correct disparities,” the report states. “Reducing all inequalities needs to be the aim. Some of the most powerful contributions can come from realizing...women’s reproductive rights.” (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    374611

    ‘Leaving no one behind’ in action: observations from FGE’sseven-year experience working with civil society.

    United Nations. UN Women. Fund for Gender Equality [FGE]

    New York, New York, UN Women, [2017]. 8 p.

    This brief contains observations from the Fund for Gender Equality’s (FGE) seven-year experience working with civil society. Gender equality is at the forefront of the 2030 Development Agenda. The Sustainable Development Goals include a stand-alone goal to advance equality, and gender-related targets mainstreamed across the Global Goals. If something has opened a door for drastic progress in the lives of women and girls worldwide, it is the principle of leaving no one behind. Leaving no one behind means prioritizing human beings’ dignity and placing the progress of the most marginalized communities first—women and girls being all too often at the top of the list. It urges us to address the structural causes of inequality and marginalization that affect them. This ambitious undertaking requires a collective effort to identify and share effective strategies to operationalize this concept. This brief offers practical insights based on the experience of the FGE in working with marginalized populations through its support to women-led civil society organizations (CSOs).
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    374598

    Making innovation and technology work for women: UN Women’s work in innovation and technology.

    United Nations. UN Women

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2017 Sep. 22 p.

    This background paper highlights the key barriers that contribute towards creating and sustaining the gender gap in innovation and technology, including the limited market awarenss and investment in innovations that meet the needs of women; the gender-blind approach to innovation; the under-representation of women as innovators and entrepreneurs; and the perceived high risk, low reward profile of investing in innovations for women and girls. The paper also outlines the concrete action that UN Women and its partners are taking to address them.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    374583

    The evaluation of comprehensive sexuality education programmes: a focus on the gender and empowerment outcomes.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2015. 64 p.

    Repeated evaluations have demonstrated that comprehensive sexuality education does not foster earlier sexual debut or unsafe sexual activity. By contrast, programmes that teach only abstinence have not proved to be effective. Additionally, recent research demonstrates that gender norms are a “gateway factor” for a range of adolescent health outcomes. Comprehensive sexuality education curricula that emphasize critical thinking about gender and power – the empowerment approach – are far more effective than conventional “gender-blind” programmes at reducing rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended early pregnancy. These studies also indicate that young people who adopt more egalitarian attitudes about gender roles, compared to their peers, are more likely to delay sexual debut, use condoms and practise contraception. They are also less likely to be in relationships characterized by violence. This report, The Evaluation of Comprehensive Sexuality Education Programmes: A Focus on the Gender and Empowerment Outcomes, represents an important milestone in our understanding of advances in the field of comprehensive sexuality education evaluation. It offers an extensive review and analysis of a wide range of evaluation studies of different comprehensive sexuality education programmes, at different stages of development and from different contexts and setting across the globe. It enriches our knowledge of new methodologies, available questionnaires and instruments that can be applied in future assessments and evaluations, most particularly to measure the gender empowerment outcome of comprehensive sexuality education programmes. It addresses the adaptation of the methodology to various contexts and age-specific groups of young people and children. This report is co-sponsored by UNFPA, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the World Health Organization and the International Planned Parenthood Federation.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    374577

    Minimum standards for prevention and response to gender-based violence in emergencies.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2015 Nov. 101 p.

    Gender based violence is a life-threatening, global health and human rights issue that violates international human rights law and principles of gender equality. In emergencies, such as conflict or natural disasters, the risk of violence, exploitation and abuse is heightened, particularly for women and girls. UNFPA’s “Minimum Standards for Prevention and Response to GBV in Emergencies (GBViE)” promote the safety and well being of women and girls in emergencies and provide practical guidance on how to mitigate and prevent gender-based violence in emergencies and facilitate access to multi-sector services for survivors.
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    374441

    Sexual and reproductive health and rights – the key to gender equality and women’s empowerment.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015 Feb. 48 p.

    This report examines the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality. It explores the different pathways of empowerment that girls and women experience, and analyzes how these pathways are affected by sexual and reproductive health and rights. Policy focus and attention given to gender equality and women’s empowerment has been growing over the last decade, and there are some areas where links are established more conclusively. Although there is strong documentation on the health benefits of investment in sexual and reproductive health, until recently the non medical benefits, such as higher levels of social and political participation, have been largely ignored, partly because they are difficult to measure. While the social and economic implications of sexual and reproductive health and rights are often overlooked, they are no less real. More attention is needed to explore the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and other critical areas relating to gender equality, such as the representation of women in political and public life.
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    374326

    10 essentials for prevention of violence against women.

    United Nations. UN Women

    2016 Nov; New York, New York, UN Women, 2016 Nov. 2 p.

    Violence against women and girls is one of the most universal and pervasive human rights violations in the world, of pandemic proportions, with country data showing that about one third of women in the world report experiencing physical or sexual violence at some point in their lifetime, mainly by their partners. UN Women provides knowledge-based policy and programming guidance to a diverse array of stakeholders at international, regional and country levels often partnering with other UN agencies and stakeholders. UN Women’s work is broadly focused on a comprehensive approach to ending violence against women and girls that addresses legislation and policies, prevention, services for survivors, research and data. The briefs included in this package aim to summarize in a concise and friendly way, for advocates, programmers and policy makers, the essential strategies for addressing violence against women in general, for preventing violence and providing services to survivors in particular.
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    374316

    Corporate evaluation on strategic partnerships for gender equality and the empowerment of women: final synthesis report.

    United Nations. UN Women. Independent Evaluation Office

    2017 Jan.; New York, New York, UN Women, 2017 Jan. 118 p.

    In its Corporate Evaluation Plan 2014-2017, the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) committed to conduct a corporate evaluation of UN Women’s work on fostering strategic partnerships. This Synthesis Report is the final product of the Corporate Evaluation on Strategic Partnerships for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (GEEW). The evaluation was conducted by an external independent team between September 2015 and September 2016 and managed by the UN Women IEO. The evaluation is intended to enhance UN Women’s approach to strategic partnerships for the implementation of the 2014-2017 Strategic Plan with the aim of ensuring that gender equality is reached by 2030. It is also expected to contribute to an understanding of how UN Women’s strategic partnerships can facilitate a strong position for gender equality and women’s empowerment within the current global development context and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development (Agenda 2030). The objectives of this formative evaluation were to: a. Assess the relevance of UN Women’s approaches to strategic partnerships given the changing global development landscape. b. Assess effectiveness and organizational efficiency in progressing towards the achievement of organizational results within the broader dynamic international context (e.g., Sustainable Development Goals [SDGs], etc.), with attention to achievement of specific organizational effectiveness and efficiency framework (OEEF) results. c. Determine whether or not the human rights approach and gender equality principles are integrated adequately in UN Women’s approach to its strategic partnerships. d. Identify and validate lessons learned, good practice examples and innovations of partnership strategies supported by UN Women. e. Provide actionable recommendations with respect to UN Women strategies and approaches to strategic partnerships.
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    374315

    Youth leap into gender equality: UN Women’s youth and gender equality strategy: empowered young women and young men as partners in achieving gender equality.

    United Nations. UN Women

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2017 Apr. 28 p.

    UN Women’s Youth and Gender Equality Strategy is a pivotal response for increased youth engagement to strengthen gender equality and womens empowerment. Young people across the world have asserted their presence and raised their voices to demand a greater role in shaping their societies’ future that have challenged the status quo. The global youth population—an unprecedented 1.8 billion—only adds to the urgency of the youth agenda. The youth upsurge represents a tremendous strategic opportunity to tap into the talents and skills of young people to advance global and national development goals. UN Women’s Youth and Gender Equality Strategy is grounded in the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW), the Beijing Platform for Action, the United Nations Millennium Declaration, the World Programme of Action for Youth, a host of resolutions and outcomes of the United Nations General Assembly on youth, gender equality and the empowerment of women, and the recently agreed, “Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development” document. Moreover, the global review and commemoration of Beijing+20 and the adoption of a dedicated, comprehensive, and transformative Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 5 on achieving Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment for all women and girls coincides with the 20th anniversary of the World Programme of Action for Youth. This is a critical moment for action. UN Women aims to reinvigorate its work on youth issues against this larger global and institutional backdrop, especially the adoption of SDG 5. UN Women recognizes that both young men and women today possess extraordinary potential to positively transform their communities. UN Women has put in place a multi-faceted strategy that takes into consideration not only traditional forms of advocacy and engagement, but also new technologies and approaches in engaging young men and young women. Key elements of UN Women’s strategy include reinvigorated partnerships with a wider spectrum of entities, resource mobilization, and active monitoring and evaluation.
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    375151

    Compendium of indicators for nutrition-sensitive agriculture.

    Herforth A; Nicolo GF; Veillerette B; Dufour C

    Rome, Italy, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO], 2016. 57 p.

    This compendium has been designed to support officers responsible for designing nutrition-sensitive food and agriculture investments, in selecting appropriate indicators to monitor if these investments are having an impact on nutrition (positive or negative) and if so, through which pathways. It provides an overview of indicators that can be relevant as part of a nutrition-sensitive approach, together with guidance to inform the selection of indicators. The purpose of this compendium is to provide a current compilation of indicators that may be measured for identified outcomes of nutrition-sensitive investments. This compendium does not provide detailed guidance on how to collect a given indicator but points to relevant guidance materials. This compendium does not represent official FAO recommendations for specific indicators or methodologies. It is intended only to provide information on the indicators, methodologies and constructs that may be relevant to consider in the monitoring and evaluation of nutrition-sensitive agriculture investments. It is not envisaged that a single project should collect data on all the indicators presented here. The selection will be informed by the type of intervention implemented, the anticipated intermediary outcomes and nutritional outcomes, as well as the feasibility of data collection in view of available resources and other constraints. The advice of M&E experts and subject matter specialists, should be sought in making the final choice of indicators and in planning the data collection and analysis, including sampling and design of questionnaires. This compendium deals with programmes, projects and investments. While some indicators may be relevant for routine monitoring at national scale, this document does not cover every indicator that would be needed to monitor nutrition sensitivity of policies. (Excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    370002

    FP2020 momentum at the midpoint 2015-2016.

    Scoggins S; Bremner J

    [Washington, D.C.], FP2020, 2016. 139 p.

    This report marks the halfway point of the FP2020 initiative, and reflects the substantial progress made to date: 1) There are now more than 300 million women and girls using modern contraception in the world’s 69 poorest countries—a milestone that has taken decades to achieve. 2) More than 30 million of those users have been added since 2012, when FP2020 was launched. 3) In Eastern and Southern Africa, for the first time ever, more than 30% of women and girls are using a modern method of contraception. 4) In West Africa, where contraceptive use has been historically low, the Ouagadougou Partnership has surpassed its goal of reaching 1 million additional users between 2011 and 2015, and is now aiming to reach 2.2 million additional users between 2015 and 2020.
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    370921

    Improving health, social welfare, and human development through women's empowerment in developing countries: The 2016 Girl Up Leadership Summit, Washington, DC, USA.

    Mendoza J

    International Journal of MCH and AIDS. 2016; 5(2):87-91.

    The United Nations Foundation’s Girl Up campaign, an initiative dedicated to promoting the health, education, and leadership of adolescent girls in developing communities around the world, hosted its annual Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, DC from July 11-13 and welcomed more than 275 girl empowerment and women empowerment proponents to take part in leadership training, listen to and learn from influential figures like United Nations Deputy High Commissioner for Human Rights Kate Gilmore and Treasurer of the United States Rosie Rios, and engage in an official lobby day in the nation’s capital. Topics ranged from the issue of child marriage and sexual and reproductive health rights to intersectional feminism and the importance of the next generation of global girl advocates. The purpose and, later on, achievement of the conference was the development of such leaders and Girl Up representatives. Summit attendee and Girl Up Campus Leader Janel Mendoza shares her experience as a longstanding Girl Up supporter and reflects on the preeminent conversations held during and following the summit.
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    372997

    Being a woman in Côte d'Ivoire: empowerment challenges.

    Kraidy AA; Noubissié EN; Sid’Ahmed TO

    Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, World Bank, 2013 Jun. 19 p.

    In Africa, women are subjected to discriminatory practices that keep them in a vulnerable situation. Their limited access to land, in a continent where the majority of the population depends on agriculture, reduces their access to credit and their capacity to undertake sustainable economic activities to generate income. They hold only 18 percent of agricultural lands and are not better off in administrations. In Cote d'Ivoire, the woman remains marginalized, with a status that is increasingly weakened today by the socio-political situation. Data from the National Statistics Institute highlight their extreme poverty: 75 percent of rural women are living below the poverty line. And they are often deprived of basic social services. Some socio-cultural factors perpetuate traditions that are harmful to girls and women. This report is the culmination of the process initiated by the World Bank as part of the establishment of its program of strengthening the role of women in Ivorian society. It reports summary proposals from the various consultations held both nationally and regionally. Designed in a participatory and decentralized approach, these consultations have made it possible to gather factual and contextual data on the four (04) themes selected for the workshops, as well as proposals that, if translated into actions, would help develop an action plan. This is, and it must be stressed, a study that has the merit of giving the floor directly to hundreds of Ivorian women from all socio-professional categories to develop themselves a roadmap based on their own daily experiences.
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    372984

    The spirit of boldness: lessons from the World Bank’s Adolescent Girls Initiative.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2015. 32 p.

    The adolescent girl’s initiative (AGI) was motivated by the idea that vocational training and youth employment programs tailored to the needs of girls and young women can improve the economic empowerment and agency. By putting that idea into practice in a number of ways, the AGI pilots are making it possible to learn about the demand for such programs and whether in their current form they are a feasible and (in some cases) cost-effective means of meeting their objectives. Adolescent females in lower-income countries face a difficult environment in their path toward economic empowerment, a critical dimension of adulthood. Females, especially from low-income countries, want to participate in programs to support their economic empowerment. Effective programs shared certain features that made it possible for them to reach adolescent girls and young women and successfully assess and impart the skills that they needed.
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    383369

    Serving up change? Gender mainstreaming and the UNESCO–WTA partnership for global gender equality.

    Szto C

    Sport in Society. 2015 Sep 14; 18(8):895-908.

    In 2006, UNESCO partnered with the Women's Tennis Association (WTA) claiming that women's tennis can help foster gender equality. This partnership was based on the notion that the empowerment of women and girls is integral to sustainable international development; yet, girls and women are positioned as both the barrier and solution to development. This document analysis uses the UNESCO–WTA project in Cameroon to critique the problematic nature of development assumptions and the approach of gender mainstreaming while contextualizing women's empowerment as a loaded term that often ignores social, political, and economic constraints. The implications of this analysis serve to reiterate calls for sport for development and peace initiatives to situate both sport and gender in their local contexts. It is also important to question the lack of accountability and transparency demonstrated by this particular corporate social responsibility partnership.
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    337482

    Women and girls safe spaces. A guidance note based on lessons learned from the Syrian crisis

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    [New York, New York], UNFPA, 2015. [32] p.

    The creation of women and girls safe spaces has emerged as a key strategy for the protection and empowerment of women and girls affected by the Syrian crisis. This document provides an overview of what safe spaces are, and what key principles should be followed when establishing such spaces in humanitarian and post-crisis contexts. This guidance is based on the experiences of UNFPA and its partners in Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Syria and Turkey. It also refers to experiences documented by the Gender-Based Violence coordination mechanisms in Jordan and Lebanon. Lessons learned from other regions are also referenced. Guidance has also been taken from the child protection and adolescent girls sectors in establishing child-friendly spaces and girls’ safe spaces.
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    335016

    A transformative stand-alone goal on achieving gender equality, women's rights and women's empowerment: Imperatives and key components. In the context of the post-2015 development framework and sustainable development goals.

    United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women [UN Women]

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2013 Jun. [48] p.

    UN Women has launched a new paper to contribute to the ongoing debate on the post-2015 development agenda. In the paper, UN Women lays out its vision for a transformative framework that addresses the structural impediments to gender equality and the achievement of women’s rights.
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    334613

    Engaging men and boys: A brief summary of UNFPA experience and lessons learned. Integrating work with men and boys into core areas of the UNFPA mandate at country, regional and global levels.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2013 Jan. [55] p.

    This report presents background about and rationale for engaging men and boys. It illustrates a range of initiatives that have engaged men and boys for the promotion of gender equality as well as sexual and reproductive health and rights. Based on experiences that have emerged over the years, the report presents a set of lessons learned in the areas of evidence and data on engaging men and boys; research, knowledge, and tools for working with men and boys; advocacy; network and partnership building; support at policy and institutional levels; and engaging men and boys at the community and individual levels.
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    334310

    The Millennium Development Goals and the road to 2015: Building on progress and responding to crisis.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2010. [52] p.

    The Millennium Development Goals provide a multidimensional framework for attacking poverty in a world of multipolar growth. By focusing on measurable results, they provide a scorecard for assessing progress toward mutually agreed targets. And by enlisting the support of national governments, international agencies, and civil society in a development partnership, they have brought greater coherence to the global development effort. In this way they take us beyond the old, sterile opposition of “developed” and “developing” or “north” and “south.” The evidence from the last 20 years, documented in the statistical record of the MDGs, is that where conditions and policies are right for growth with equity, rapid and sustainable progress toward improving the lives of the poorest people can take place. Not every country will achieve the global MDG targets in the time allowed. Success has not been distributed evenly and there have been serious setbacks. Some countries are still burdened by legacies of bad policies, institutional failures, and civil and international conflict. For them, progress toward the MDGs has been delayed, but the examples of good progress by others point the way for their eventual success.
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    334252

    Handbook for national action plans on violence against women.

    United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women [UN Women]

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2012. [80] p.

    The Handbook for National Action Plans on Violence against Women brings together current knowledge on effective policy for the prevention of, and response to, violence against women, and concretely demonstrates how States have developed and implemented such policy in their own contexts. Although not a model plan itself , this publication sets out guidelines to help policy makers and advocates formulate effective plans. It is based on good practices in States’ plans and the advice of experts from different countries and regions. It first outlines the international and regional legal and policy framework which mandates States to adopt and implement National Action Plans to address violence against women. It then presents a model framework for National Action Plans on violence against women, which sets out recommendations, accompanied by explanatory commentaries and good practice examples.
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    334251

    Report on the online discussion on eliminating violence against women and girls -- gaps, challenges and strategic directions in prevention and multisectoral services and responses.

    Baker J

    [New York, New York], UN Women, [2012]. [32] p. (CSW 57 Online Discussion)

    Between 23 July and 7 August 2012, UN Women ran a dynamic online discussion to support preparations for the forthcoming 57th Commission on the Status of Women which brought together the views of diverse respondents on the good practices and key gaps and challenges in the prevention of and response to violence against women and girls. Participants included representatives from civil society, government organizations, research and leadership institutions and UN agencies in many countries from all regions of the world. The discussions will be taken into consideration in the development of the Secretary-General’s Reports to the Commission on the Status of Women.
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    333442

    World development report 2012. Gender equality and development.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2011. [458] p.

    The lives of girls and women have changed dramatically over the past quarter century. The pace of change has been astonishing in some areas, but in others, progress toward gender equality has been limited -- even in developed countries. This year's World Development Report: Gender Equality and Development argues that gender equality is a core development objective in its own right. It is also smart economics. Greater gender equality can enhance productivity, improve development outcomes for the next generation, and make institutions more representative. The Report also focuses on four priority areas for policy going forward: (i) reducing excess female mortality and closing education gaps where they remain, (ii) improving access to economic opportunities for women, (iii) increasing women's voice and agency in the household and in society, and (iv) limiting the reproduction of gender inequality across generations.
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    349475
    Peer Reviewed

    Telemedicine and health information technology to achieve Millennium Development Goals [editorial]

    Merrell RC; Doarn CR

    Telemedicine and e-Health. 2011 Mar; 17(2):63.

    This editorial focuses on the importance of telemedicine and health information technology (HIT) in achieving some of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It discusses how telemedicine and HIT could assist in achieving Goal 6 - HIV, malaria and other diseases, Goal 4 - reduction in child mortality, Goal 5 - improvement in maternal health, and Goal 3 - empowerment for women.
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    333230

    Girls decide: Choices on sex and pregnancy.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2011 Jan. [28] p.

    Girls Decide: Choices on Sex and Pregnancy explores innovative projects for girls and young women that offer great potential for making a difference on a large scale. These projects empower girls and young women, and affect all areas of their development, by implementing a positive approach towards their sexual and reproductive health and rights. When girls and young women understand that their sexual identities, feelings, emotions, sexual behaviour and aspirations are legitimate and respected, they are empowered. When they have access to the knowledge and the opportunities to make choices about relationships, sexuality and pregnancy, and when communities and societies give girls and young women the space and support they need to become confident, decision-making individuals, everyone benefits. It is time for policy- and decision-makers, educators, service providers and community leaders to re-think strategies for girls and young women: invest in, protect and promote policies, programmes, services and research that incorporate a positive approach to their choices around all aspects of sex, sexuality and pregnancy.
    Add to my documents.

Pages