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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    346581

    Hormonal contraceptive options for women with headache: a review of the evidence.

    Edlow AG; Bartz D

    Reviews In Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2010 Spring; 3(2):55-65.

    Migraine affects as many as 37% of reproductive-age women in the United States. Hormonal contraception is the most frequently used form of birth control during the reproductive years, and given the significant proportion of reproductive-age women affected by migraine, there are several clinical considerations that arise when considering hormonal contraceptives in this population. In this review, key differences among headache, migraine, and migraine with aura, as well as strict diagnostic criteria, are described. The recommendations of the World Health Organization and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists regarding hormonal contraception initiation and continuation in women with these diagnoses are emphasized. Finally, information about the effect of hormonal fluctuations on headache is provided with recommendations regarding contraception counseling in patients who experience headache while taking hormonal contraception.
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  2. 2
    345658

    U S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, 2010: adapted from the World Health Organization Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, 4th edition.

    Farr S; Folger SG; Paulen M; Tepper N; Whiteman M; Zapata L; Culwell K; Kapp N; Cansino C

    MMWR. Recommendations and Reports. 2010 Jun 18; 59(RR-4):1-86.

    CDC created U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use, 2010, from guidance developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and finalized the recommendations after consultation with a group of health professionals who met in Atlanta, Georgia, during February 2009. This guidance comprises recommendations for the use of specific contraceptive methods by women and men who have certain characteristics or medical conditions. The majority of the U.S. guidance does not differ from the WHO guidance and covers >60 characteristics or medical conditions. However, some WHO recommendations were modified for use in the United States, including recommendations about contraceptive use for women with venous thromboembolism, valvular heart disease, ovarian cancer, and uterine fibroids and for postpartum and breastfeeding women. Recommendations were added to the U.S. guidance for women with rheumatoid arthritis, history of bariatric surgery, peripartum cardiomyopathy, endometrial hyperplasia, inflammatory bowel disease, and solid organ transplantation. The recommendations in this document are intended to assist health-care providers when they counsel women, men, and couples about contraceptive method choice. Although these recommendations are meant to serve as a source of clinical guidance, health-care providers should always consider the individual clinical circumstances of each person seeking family planning services.
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  3. 3
    345426
    Peer Reviewed

    Expanding Concern for Women's Health in Developing Countries. The Case of the Eastern Mediterranean Region.

    Saliba M; Zurayk H

    Women's Health Issues. 2010 May-Jun; 20(3):171-177.

    Background: Women's health is still largely associated with the notion of reproduction in developing countries despite a more varied disease burden, including noncommunicable conditions resulting from consequences of changing epidemiologic and demographic patterns on women's health. Methods: The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Burden of Disease data base is used to derive for the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) cause-specific rates of death and of disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) by age for adult women, and percent of total deaths and total DALYs for women in the reproductive ages, as related to maternal conditions and to three selected noncommunicable conditions, namely, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and neuropsychiatry conditions. Inequalities by country income category are examined. Results: Maternal health conditions still form a substantial component of the disease burden, with an increasing burden of cardiovascular disease and cancer starting in the late reproductive years and beyond. The burden of neuropsychiatric conditions is also high during the reproductive years, reflecting possibly the stress of multiple roles of women as well as stress of war and conflict that permeate the EMR. Women in low- to middle-income countries suffer more from maternal health conditions and less from neuropsychiatry conditions than women in high-income countries. Conclusion: The wider disease burden of women should be addressed making use of available reproductive health services taking special account of interactions between reproductive and noncommunicable conditions for better health of women during and beyond reproduction. Better measures of the burden of illness should be developed. There is a special need for improved health information systems in the EMR.
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  4. 4
    345367
    Peer Reviewed

    Discourses on women's empowerment in Ghana.

    Anyidoho NA; Manuh T

    Development. 2010; 53(2):267-273.

    Successive post-independence governments have embraced women's empowerment in one form or another, either because of their own ideological positioning, or because of demands by their 'donor friends/partners' and/or organized domestic groups and NGOs. What has emerged is a varied landscape on women's rights and empowerment work comprising the state bureaucracy, multilateral and bilateral agencies, NGOs, and women's rights organizations, with their accompanying discourses. In the Ghanaian context, Nana Akua Anyidoho and Takyiwaa Manuh look at what the discourses of empowerment highlight, ignore or occlude, the convergences and divergences among them, and how they speak to or accord with the lived realities of the majority of Ghanaian women. Given that the policy landscape in Ghana is highly influenced by donors, they ask which discourses dominate, and how are they used for improving women's lives in ways that are meaningful to them.
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  5. 5
    339674

    Asking the right questions: Advancing an HIV research agenda for women and children.

    International AIDS Society [IAS]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], International AIDS Society, 2010 Mar. 5 p.

    Substantial progress has been made in expanding access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) for adults and children living with HIV and preventing vertical transmission. However, the scale-up of ART programs has also drawn attention to a number of knowledge gaps related to clinical management and ART program delivery for women and children. This document includes 20 recommendations for expanding and improving responses to HIV-related challenges facing women and children worldwide.
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