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  1. 1
    270807

    Women taking hold of technology.

    International Women's Tribune Centre [IWTC]

    New York, New York, International Women's Tribune Center, 1984 Sep. iv, 116 p.

    The 1st 2 issues of newsletters in this volume, Women and Appropriate Technology, Parts I and II, emphasize resource materials and appropriate technology groups and projects from around the world that might be found useful. The 3rd issue, Women and Food Production, focuses specifically on the need for women to have greater access to land, technology, and capital in the production of food crops, whether for their own use or as crops for marketing. The last issues, Women MOving Appropriate Technology Ahead, concentrates on strategies for introducing appropriate technology ideas and approaches into one's own community. Together, these 4 issues combine several issues related to women's access to and uses of appropriate technologies, with practical information for concrete action and sample projects involving women from countries around the world. Originally published between 1978 and 1973, all 4 newsletters in this volume have been updated and edited in some parts to assure their continued relevance. Resource groups, UN news and conferences, available periodicals, training, credit and loan information, cash crops, international nongovernmental organizations, and government agencies are all discussed.
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  2. 2
    035613

    The United Nations Development Programme and women in development. Background brief.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    [Unpublished] 1984 Jan. 13 p.

    The UN Development Program (UNDP) began a special drive in the mid-1970s to ensure that women would enjoy greater benefits from its programs of technical cooperation. Efforts have increased steadily since 1975 when UNDP's Governing Council declared that "the integration of women in development should be a continuous consideration in the formulation, design, and implementation of UNDP projects and programs." They involve: promotion to create a greater awareness of women's needs and approaches which can meet them effectively; orientation and training to enhance skills in developing, implementing, and monitoring programs of benefit to women; improving the data base to provide better information on women's productive roles; programming to address women's concerns and generate self-sustaining activities, replicable nationally, regionally, and interregionally; and personnel action to increase the number of women professionals within UNDP. A number of projects supported by UNDP are directly benefiting women, especially those in rural and poor urban areas of developing countries. Among other things, these projects are helping to reduce women's workloads; addressing needs for clean water, health care, and education; providing training in basic skills; and helping to develop income-earning potentials. Examples are cited for the countries of Indonesia, Mali, Mexico, Yemen Arab Republic, Nepal, Rwanda, Honduras, Papua New Guinea, Liberia, Bolivia, and the Philippines.
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  3. 3
    052721

    Cooperation by UNICEF in the elimination of traditional practices affecting the health of women and children in Africa (Extract).

    Ngom MT

    In: Report on a Seminar on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children in Africa, organized by the Senegal Ministry of Public Health and the NGO Working Group on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children. Dakar, Senegal, Ministry of Public Health and NGO Working Group on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women adn Children, 1984. 182-4.

    This contribution begins with a statement of praise for the efforts of the Senegal conference, complimenting the conference's recognition of positive and negative influencing practices. Positive practices should be encouraged with arguments and striking examples. Attention is drawn to UNICEF document PRO-71, the product of the 1980 Inter-Organization Consultation Meeting on Combating the Practice of Female Circumcision (FC), through the improvement of women's status, and the elimination of false ideologies such as those related to the necessity of FC for the preservation of female modesty, virginity, and chastity. Further attention is drawn to the efforts of a multi-disciplinary study group on FC set up in Ivory coast. Finally, the readiness of UNICEF to further female and child health development, and growth chart, oral rehydration, breastfeeding immunization, food supplementation, family spacing, and female education developments, are discussed.
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  4. 4
    033848

    Population change and development in the ECWA region

    Caldwell P; Caldwell JC

    In: Aspects of population change and development in some African and Asian countries. Cairo, Egypt, Cairo Demographic Centre, 1984. 43-56. (CDC Research Monograph Series no. 9)

    This paper examines the relationship between economic development and demographic change in the 13 states of the Economic Commission for West Asia (ECWA) region. Demographic variables considered include per capita income, proportion urban, proportion in urban areas with over 100,000 inhabitants, literacy among those over 15 years, and literacy among women. Unweighted rankings on these variables were added to produce a development ranking or general development index. Then this index was used to investigate the relationship between development and individual scores and rankings for various demographic indices. The development index exhibited a rough fit with the mortality indices, especially life expectancy at birth. Mortality decline appears to be most closely related to rise in income. At the same income level, countries that have experienced substantial social change tend to exhibit the lowest mortality, presumably because of a loosening in family role patterns. In contrast, the relationship between development and fertility measures seemed to be almost random. A far closer correlation was noted between the former and the general development index. It is concluded that economic development alone will not reduce fertility. Needed are 2 changes: 1) profound social change in the family and in women's status, achievable through increases in female education, and 2) government family planning programs to ensure access to contraception.
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  5. 5
    268447

    Report on the evaluation of the UNFPA-supported women, population and development projects in Indonesia (INS/79/P20 and INS/83/P02) and of the role of women in three other UNFPA-supported projects in Indonesia (INS/77/P03, INS/79/P04, and INS/79/P16).

    Concepcion MB; Thein TM; Simonen M

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1984 Apr. vi, 52 p.

    The Evaluation Mission analyzes and assess the 2 United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA)-supported Women, Population and Development Projects and the role of women in 3 other UNFPA-assisted projects in Indonesia. The Mission concluded that the family planning and cooperative/income generation scheme as evolved in the 2 projects has contributed to increasing contraceptive acceptance and continuation and to a shift from the less reliable to the more reliable contraceptive methods. The projects have also assisted women and their families to expand their income generating activities, raise their incomes, and improve the family's standard of living. The Mission recommends that: 1) more diversified income producing activities be encouraged; 2) product outlets be identified and mapped and appropriate marketing strategies devised; 2) loan repayment schedules be carefully examined; 4) data collection, monitoring and evaluation be streamlined and strenghthened; and 5) the process of the entire rural cooperatives/income generation scheme be more comprehensively documented. In the 3 other projects, which are addressed to both men and women, the needs and concerns of women have not been adequately taken into account and/or the participation of women in all phases of the projects and their access to project benefits have not been equal to men. The Mission therefore recommends that special consideration be given to women's concerns in the design and formulation of all projects. The Mission ascertained that non-women specific projects tend to perpetuate existing discriminatory or unequal access to, and control of, resources by women unless specific consideration is accorded to them.
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  6. 6
    031334

    Protection of working mothers: an ILO global survey (1964-84).

    International Labour Office [ILO]

    Women At Work. 1984; (2):1-71.

    This document describes the current status of maternity protection legislation in developed and developing countries and is based primarily on the findings of the International Labor Organization's (ILO's) global assessment of laws and regulations concerning working women before and after pregnancy. The global survey collected information from 18 Asian and Pacific countries, 36 African nations, 28 North and South American countries, 14 Middle Eastern countries, 19 European market economy countries, and 11 European socialist countries. Articles in 2 ILO conventions provide standards for maternity protection. According to the operative clauses of these conventions working women are entitled to 1) 12 weeks of maternity leave, 2) cash benefits during maternity leaves, 3) nursing breaks during the work day, and 4) protection against dismissal during maternity. Most countries have some qualifying conditions for granting maternity leaves. These conditions either state that a worker must be employed for a certain period of time or contributed to an insurance plan over a defined period of time before a maternity leave will be granted. About 1/2 of the countries in the Asia and Pacific region, the Americas, Africa, and in the Europe market economy group provide maternity leaves of 12 or more weeks. In all European socialist countries, women are entitled to at least 12 weeks maternity leave and in many leaves are considerably longer than 12 months. In the Middle East all but 3 countries provide leaves of less than 12 weeks. Most countries which provide maternity leaves also provide cash benefits, which are usually equivalent to 50%-100% of the worker's wages, and job protection during maternity leaves. Some countries extend job protection beyond the maternity leave. For example, in Czechoslovakia women receive job protection during pregnancy and for 3 years following the birth, if the woman is caring for the child. Nursing breaks are allowed in 5 of the Asian and Pacific countries, 30 of African countries, 18 of the countries in the Americas, 9 of the Middle East countries, 16 of European market economy countries, and in all of the European socialist countries. Several new trends in maternity protection were observed in the survey. A number of countries grant child rearing leaves following maternity leaves. In some countries these leaves can be granted to either the husband or the wife. Some countries have regulations which allow parents to work part time while rearing their children and some permit parents to take time off to care for sick children. In most of the countries, the maternity protection laws and regulations are applied to government workers and in many countries they are also applied to workers in the industrial sector. A list of the countries which have ratified the articles in the ILO convenants concerning maternity benefits is included.
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  7. 7
    268191

    Female employment and fertility in developing countries

    Brazzell JF

    In: Quantitative approaches to analyzing socioeconomic determinants of Third World fertility trends: reviews of the literature. Project final report: overview, by Indiana University Fertility Determinants Group, George J. Stolnitz, director. [Unpublished] 1984. 79-91.

    Simple no-work/work distinctions are an unreliable basis for estimating causal linkages connecting female employment/work-status patterns to fertility. World Fertility Survey (WFS) data show about 3/4, 1/2, and 1/4 child differentials for over 20, 10-19, and under 10 years marital duration grouss respectively, for women employed since marriage. Effects on marriage seem strongest in Latin America and weakest in Asia. Controlling for age, marital duration, urban-rural residence, education, and husband's work status. But from the results of a number of WFS and other studies, it seems relationships of work status and fertility are difficult to confirm beyond directional indications, even in Latin America. A UN study using proximate determinants such as contraception and work status including a housework category indicated differentials in contraceptive practice were not significant net of control for education. Philippine data indicates low-income employment might increase fertility by decreasing breastfeeding, while WFS data from 5 Asian countries indicated pre-marital work encourages increased marriage age, without being specific about effects. Also, female employment must affect a large population to have a real impact on aggregate fertility, since female labor force activity is likely to change slowly if at all. Data presently available do not cover micro-level factors that may be important, such as effects of work on breastfeeding, nor do they lend themselves to examination by multi-equation analysis. More work is needed to isolate effects of work-status attributes like male employment, and to analyze intra-cohort mid-course fertility objective changes, as well as new theoretical process models such as competing time use and maternal role incompatibility.
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  8. 8
    031396

    The changing roles of women and men in the family and fertility regulation: some labour policy aspects

    Oppong C

    In: Family and population. Proceedings of the "Scientific Conference on Family and Population," Espoo, Finland, May 25-27, 1984, edited by Hellevi Hatunen. Helsinki, Finland, Vaestoliitto, 1984. 62-83.

    There is growing evidence that labor policies, such as those advocated by the International Labor Organization (ILO), promote changes in familial roles and that these changes in turn have an impact on fertility. A conceptual model describing these linkages is offered and the degree to which the linkages hypothesized in the model are supported by research findings is indicated. The conceptual model specifies that: 1) as reliance on child labor declines, through the enactment of minimum age labor laws, the economic value of children declines, and parents adopt smaller family size ideals; 2) as security increases for the elderly, through the provision of social security and pension plans, the elderly become less dependent on their children, and the perceived need to produce enough children to ensure security in old age is diminished; and 3) as sexual equality in job training and employment and the availability of flexible work schedules increase, sexual equality in the domestic setting increases, and women begin to exert more control over their own fertility. ILO studies and many other studies provide considerable evidence in support of these hypothesized linkages; however, the direction or causal nature of some of the associations has not been established. Development levels, rural or urban residence, and a number of other factors also appear to influence many of these relationships. Overall, the growing body of evidence accords well with ILO programs and instruments which promote: 1) the enactment of minimum age work laws to reduce reliance on child labor, 2) the establishment of social security systems and pension plans to promote the economic independence of the elderly, 3) the promotion of sexual equality in training programs and employment; 4) the promotion of the idea of sexual equality in the domestic setting; and 5) the establishment of employment policies which do not unfairly discriminate against workers with family responsibilities.
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  9. 9
    030193

    Women in health and development: the view from the Americas.

    Who Chronicle. 1984; 38(6):249-55.

    This article highlights the central features of the 5-Year Regional Plan of Action on Women in Health and Development, adopted by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) in 1981. Although the Plan does not mandate specific actions, it encourages certain activities and establishes an annual reporting system concerning these activities. The Plan recognizes that women's health depends upon numerous factors outside of medicine, including women's employment, education, social status, and accepted roles, access to economic resources, and political power. The low status of women is reinforced by the sexual double standard that makes women responsible for the reproductive process yet denies them the right to control that process. The Plan advocates an incremental approach, in which projects 1st focus on priority areas and groups and then expand to provide more general benefits. Programs exclusively for women are not advocated; encouraged, instead, is the integration of women's health and development activities into the mainstream of general activities promoting health. Among the areas targeted for action are the collection of statistics on women's health, women's nutritional problems, environmental health, maternal-child health services, screening for breast and cervical cancer, and family planning . Community participation is proposed as a good vehicle for local action and an essential tool in the campaign for health for all. Efforts must be made to enlist women's support in identifying community needs, planning health actions, selecting appropriate resources and personnel, establishing and administering health services, and evaluating the results. Overall, the Plan provides a solid basis upon which health authorities of the Americas can build.
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  10. 10
    029799

    Planned parenthood and women's development in the Indian Ocean Region: experience from Bangladesh, India and Pakistan.

    Aziz F

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1984 Sep. 43 p.

    The Indian Ocean Region (IOR) of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) has been involved in Planned Parenthood and Women's Development (PPWD) since the program was launched in 1976. This paper, which brings together the experience of the projects and approaches from 3 countries of the region -- Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan, aims to help the region analyze the progress made and assess strategies which can be more widely replicated. The Bangladesh Family Planning Association (BFPA) initiated PPWD projects in mid-1977, the majority in collaboration with well-established women's organizations. These projects generally provide income-generating activities, including training and assistance in the marketing of the products resulting from such activities. In 1979, together with the Mahila Samity (the national women's organization), the FPA was able to integrate women's development into its programs in 19 unions. Each union has a population of 20,000 and the FPA undertakes family planning motivation and services committees. Since 1977 the FPA has collaborated with the Chandpur Dedicated Women to promote family planning and women's development activities. A project to reach women through child-centered activities was initiated by the FPA in 1979 in response to the International Year of the Child. A case study is included of the Sterilized Women's Welfare Samity Project in Mymensingh. For some years the Family Planning Association of India (FPAI) has worked through existing women's clubs or Mahila Mandals as a way of reaching rural and semirural women. The Mahila Mandals have been instrumental in involving young women in development activities and in establishing youth clubs and also have been a focal point for mobilizing community resources. The use of government facilities by the integrated projects in Malur and Karnataka and the cooperation with various extension services is noteworthy. In 1977 the FPAI decided to launch a number of specific projects, including as the Pariwar Pragati Mandals (family betterment clubs) popularly know as PPM, and the Young Women's Development Program. Project case studies are included. The Family Planning Association of Pakistan launched its PPWD program in 1978 with the objective of creating conditions within which responsible parenthood could become a way of life, particularly among underprivileged rural women, and to strengthen links between family planning and other individual and community problems. Most of the original PPWD projects were initiated in 1978 and were conducted with other community development and womens's organizations. Since 1978, the PPWD program has undergone several changes and more emphasis is now placed on family planning and on involving young women. Case studies are included. Common features of the PPWD programs of Bangladesh, India, and Pakistan are identified.
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  11. 11
    029780

    Since Mexico '75: a decade of progress?

    Reid EA

    Development: Seeds of Change. 1984; (4):76-9.

    The International Women's Year (IWY) Conference in 1975 was the first opportunity for dialogue between 2 important emerging movements: the feminist movement and the movement to integrate women and development. The women and development movement began at about the same time as the feminist movement. By 1970 the full integration of women in the total development effort was adopted as an objective of the International Development Strategy for the Second Development Decade. In 1974 the women and development movement achieved a minor but significant recognition in US policy. The US foreign Assistance Act was amended to require "inter alia" US representatives in international agencies to encourage and promote the integration of women into national economies. The dialogue of the 2 movements at the IWY Conference, and its associated nongovernmental Tribune was electric. Feminists began to appreciate that their movement was only 1 part of a global women's movement, and they started to consider their list of basic demands as geopolitically specific and to realize and accept that elsewhere the list might include access to land, food prices, and many other issues. Feminism offered those concerned with women and development a holistic approach to changing women's lives, aimed at changing all facets of oppression and not just, for example, to increase access to education or to create greater economic independences. The conference provided a turning point for both movements by legitimizing them and by providing the impetus and the networks for a worldwide movement. The dialogue also produced a conference document, the Declaration of Mexico, 1975. Apart from the adoption of this Declaration and a World Plan of Action for the implementation of the objectives of the International Women's Year, several important decisions were made at the Mexico City Conference. It was decided to establish 1975-85 as the UN Decade for Women. This decision directed some of the energy generated by the Conference towards ensuring continuing international debate and action. A 2nd important initiative arising from the IWY Conference was the creation of the Voluntary Fund for the Decade for Women (VFDW) to provide financial and technical assistance to women. A Mid-Decade Conference was held in July 1980 in Copenhagen and adopted a Program of Action for the Second Half of the UN Decade for Women: Equality, Development and Peace. The task in preparation for the 1985 Review and Appraisal Conference for the end of the Decade for Women is to find a better instrument for assisting national governments and others to understand how to go about determining what problems women face in their countries and appropriate and effective means of overcoming them.
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  12. 12
    029774

    Women in national planning: false expectations.

    Mohammadi P

    Development: Seeds of Change. 1984; 4:80-1.

    A strategy, developed by the Women's Programme of the Social Development Division of the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) to promote women's participation in the development process, is described. Although recommendations of international conferences invariably call for the inclusion of women in all levels of development planning, efforts to involve women in planning at the national level have met with little success. Even if women received sufficient training and education to qualify them as planners, their impact on development planning would be minimal due to deficiencies within the national planning process. Top planning units in most Asian and Pacific countries are composed of highly trained expatriots who lack an understanding of the needs of the population in general and of women in particular. The strategy developed by the Women's Programme is based on expanding the role of women in development planning at the local level and gradually sensitizing the planning hierarchy to women's needs and to women's abilities. This awareness building can be facilitated by developing links between government agencies and women's organizations. Application of this strategy revealed that it was much more difficult to build awareness among government officials and planners then to involve women in development at the local level. The planning process is constantly subject to personnel and policy changes because of changing political situations, and planners remain isolated from the public. At the community level, women's efforts to promote development are highly successful. Programs developed by women tend to benefit the entire community, and women's roles in these activities are highly visible. These successful efforts will contribute toward building an awareness of women's capacities to promote development. Conditions which are conducive to local level involvement of women include the political will to promote participation, the provision of appropriate training to prepare community members for participation, and the existence of an adequate infrastructure and sufficient resources to carry out programs.
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  13. 13
    029773

    On the road to Nairobi '85.

    Shahani LR

    Development: Seeds of Change. 1984; 4:85-6.

    The Secretary General of the World Conference to Review and Appraise the Achievements of the United Nations Decade for Women discussed preparations for the conference, which will be held in Nairobi in July 1985, and made a special plea for the continued support of the conference's goals by the Arab parliamentarians. The Nairobi conference is an outgrowth of the 1975 World Conference of the International Women's Year and of the 1980 World Conference of the United Nations Decade for Women, Equality, Development and Peace. The 1975 conference raised the consciousness of the world in reference to women's role in development, and the 1980 conference provided a plan of action for integrating women in the development process. The task of the 1985 conference is to assess the accomplishments of the past 10 years and to identify strategies for the future. 1 of the documents which will be discussed at the conference is the UN's world survey of the role of women in development. In preparation for the conference the secretariat is preparing a report on women and children living under racist regimes in South Africa and another on women and children living in occupied Arab territories. Priorities identified by the conference's preparatory body include the need 1) to promote equality in international economic relations, 2) to reduce international tensions, and 3) to address the needs of poor, rural, abused, elderly women and the needs of women residing in areas of armed conflict. The preparatory body also expressed the view that the goals of equality, development and peace should be given equal priority. The participants at the conference should identify the ways in which women can most effectively continue their struggle to create conditions conducive to peace, ensure that the provisions of the Covention of the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women are implemented, and consider ways in which women can be further integrated into the development process. The nongovernment forum, which will convene a meeting in Nairobi just prior to the opening of the world conference, is likely to provide innovative suggestions for the consideration of the participants at the conference. Meanwhile all nations, and especially the Arab nations, are called on to promote the role women in their own nations and to work out differences within and between governments in the many preliminary meetings which will precede the conference. These efforts will ensure that the participants come together in Nairobi in a spirit of cooperation.
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  14. 14
    028827

    Sex differentials in mortality.

    Lopez AD

    Who Chronicle. 1984; 38(5):217-24.

    As part of its regional strategy for attaining health for all, the World Health Organization (WHO) European Region seeks to reduce sex differentials in mortality. In developing countries, the health consequences of social, economic, and cultural discrimination against females have produced a higher mortality rate among females than males. In contrast, there is a trend toward increasing excess male mortality in the developed countries. The sex differential in mortality arises from 2 broad groups of causes: genetic-biological and enivronmental. In high mortality countries, environmental factors may reduce or cancel out the biological advantages that women enjoy over men. As mortality is reduced through improved nutrition, public health measures, and better health care and education, women's environmental disadvantage is reduced and genetic-biological factors may increase the female life span faster than that of males. In the 3rd phase of this process, life style factors (e.g. alcohol abuse, cigarette smoking) may become increasingly detrimental to male health and survival, leading female mortality to decline at a faster pace than that of males. Although males appear to have adapted less well than women to the stresses of modernization, there has been a trend toward high risk behavior patterns among women too as a result of the changing female role. Prospects for the future trend of sex differentials in developed societies depend largely on developments in 2 areas: the effective treatment of degenerative and chronic diseases, which dominate the cause-of-death structure in these societies; and prevention through health education and encouragement of changes in personal behavior and life style. The challenge for women is to resist pressures to adopt a hazardous life style (e.g. smoking) that might offset the benefits of their improved social status.
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  15. 15
    027559

    Interview: Ms. Mary Chinery-Hesse on: women in development.

    Popleone. 1984 Jul; 1(1):13-6.

    In the context of an interview, the role of women in development is discussed. Despite the fact that women in Africa have the primary responsiblity of carrying out the daily agricultural tasks involved in planting, tending, harvesting, and marketing, men are the target of most development programs. This inconsistency is attributable to a variety of cultural and social factors. For example, the fruits of agriculture are culturally defined as belonging to the men, and men, therefore, make the decisions about how the proceeds from farming are to be spent. Factors such as this reduce the visibility of women's major contribution to agricultural production. Recent socioeconomic and demographic changes have altered the role of women in African societies in a number of ways. Tribal structures have broken down and traditional sex rules have been disrupted. Subsistence patterns have also been disrupted, and parents now realize that they must limit family size in order to provide adequately for their children. Increased access to family planning is helping these parents reduce family size. The high proportion of young people in the population strains many support facilities and increases hardships for women. The greatest achievement for women in the past decade is the increased recognition given to their contribution in development. Many African governments have created commissions and committees charged with the task of formulating policies and programs to integrate women in development activities. The UN Development Program (UNDP) has helped upgrade the status of women by funding many projects aimed at improving conditions for women. The UNDP provides funds for maternal and child health programs, projects aimed at improving water supplies, and projects aimed at generating income for women. In addition, UNDP is helping to develop effective strategies for integrating women in development planning. Communication plays an important role in enhancing the position of women in Africa. Public knowledge of women's problems and needs has increased, and many misconceptions about the role of women have been corrected.
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  16. 16
    027558

    Interview: Dr. Nafis Sadik on: population and women in development--the second decade of women. What roles?

    Popleone. 1984 Jul; 1(1):23-4.

    The role of women in development is discussed. In africa, women, and especially rural women, assume major responsibilities for child rearing; caring for the elderly; providing food, health care, and other services for family members; producing agricultural crops; and undertaking other income-generating activities. These tasks and responsibilities are not fully recognized in the national statistics. Furthermore, women do not derive a corresponding share of the benefits of development programs nor are they accorded a correspondingly important role in development planning. The major achievement for women in developing countries during the last decade has been the increased public awareness of women's contributions to the well-being of the family and of society. This awareness must now be translated into effective programs and policies. The United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) tries to ensure that women benefit from population projects and that women fully participate in all aspects of program development and implementation. UNFPA also provides education and skill development programs for women and seeks to develop projects relevant to the needs of women. Communication plays a major role in educating the public about the needs, problems, and concerns of women and about the impact of population growth on the family and on the individual.
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  17. 17
    027968

    Breast cancer, cervical cancer, and depot medroxyprogesterone acetate. [WHO Collaborative Study of Neoplasia and Steroid Contraceptives] [letter].

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction

    Lancet. 1984 Nov 24; 2(8413):1207-8.

    This letter presents the preliminary findings of a collaborative, multinational, hospital-based, case-control study being conducted under the auspices of the World Health Organization to assess the influence of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) on risks of mammary, gynecological, and hepatobiliary malignancies. The frequency of ever-use of DMPA was greater in breast cancer cases (15/246, or 6,0%) than in controls (381/4162, or 9.2%). When adjusted for age, center, age of birth of 1st child, and nulliparity, the relative risk in women who had ever used DMPA was 0.7. The lowest risk was noted in women who had used DMPA for 3 or more years, but no decreasing trend in risk with duration of use was evident. The reducton in risk of breast cancer in DMPA users was largely confined to women with 1st exposure after age 30 years. In terms of cervical cancer, a history of DMPA use was reported by slightly more cases (67/469, or 14.3%) than controls (269/2704, or 9.9%). Use of oral contraceptives, number of cervical smears, and number of pregnancies were the variables most strongly related to cervical or having the greatest influence on relative risk estimates for users of DMPA. When controlled for these 4 factors and age and center, the relative risk in DMPA was 1.13. The highest relative risk was found in longterm users, although there was no clear trend of increasing risk with duration of DMPA use. These preliminary findings provide no evidence that DMPA increases the risk of breast cancer. The relative risk for cervical cancer for DMPA users obtained in this study could be due to chance or to incomplete control for the confounding effect of sexual variables. Although the absence of a trend of increasing risk with duration of use tends to rule out a causal connection between DMPA use and cervical cancer, the doubling of risk in women who used DMPA for 5 years or more is of potential concern.
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  18. 18
    025380

    Statistics on children in UNICEF countries.

    UNICEF

    New York, UNICEF, 1984 May. 280 p.

    The data in this set of 135 country profiles for 1981 are made up from 9 major sources and cover the countries and territories with which the UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) cooperates. In terms of infant morttality, countries are divided into 5 infant mortality groups: a very high infant mortality (a) group of countries, with a 1981 infant mortality rate (IMR) estimate of 150 (rounded) or more deaths per 1000 live births; a very high infant mortality (b) group of countries with a 1981 IMR estimate between 110 (rounded) and 140 (rounded); a high infant mortality group of a middle infant mortality group of countries, with a 1981 IMR estimate of between 26 and 50 (rounded); and a low infnat mortality group of countries, with a 1981 IMR estimate of 25 or less. For each country data are also presented on nutrition, demographic, education, and economic indicators.
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  19. 19
    024733

    IPPF plan 1985-87. Adopted by the Member's Assembly, November 1983.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, IPPF, 1984 Feb. 26 p.

    This 3-year plan describes how the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) intends to pursue the common goals of its membership: guide and encourage program development at all levels; indicate IPPF international strategies which support the work of Family Planning Associations (FPAs); and provide a statement to the outside world of IPPF's contribution to family planning during the plan period. The Plan has 7 Action Areas which reflect IPPF's overall priorities: the role of the nongovernmental sector in family planning; promotion of family planning as a basic human right; coverage and quality of family planning services; meeting needs of young people; women's development; male involvement in family planning; and resource development. Within each Action Area, the discussion suggests national strategies by which FPAs can achieve their objectives, while international strategies identify activities through which volunteers and staff can carry out their roles at the international and regional level. Action Area 1 outlines measures to carry out IPPF's basic commitment to support the efforts of FPAs in their national environments and describes how IPPF intends to play its full part as an international federation of voluntary family planning organizations. Continued efforts are needed thoughout the Federation to increase understanding of the pioneering role of FPAs and IPPF in advancing family planning as part of overall development and social change. The objectives of Action Area 1 -- the role of the nongovernmental sector in family planning -- are to improve FPA program effectiveness, to strengthen the contribution of volunteers to planned parenthood; to broaden community participation in family planning; and to intensify understanding of the role of nongovernmental organizations in family planning. The objectives of Action Area II are to increase adherence to family planning as a basic human right, to overcome obstacles to the exercise of the human right to family planning, and to increase awareness of the interrelationship between people and development, resources, and the environment. Objectives of the remaining 5 Action Areas include: ensure greater availability and accessibility of family planning services; raise and maintain standards of family planning services and increase their acceptability; improve and expand the education components of family planning programs; improve and extend family life education and counseling activities for young people; improve and expand efforts at the community level to intergrate family planning with women's development; increase male contraceptive practice; and focus effort on meeting unmet need.
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  20. 20
    024031

    A crucial new direction for international family planning.

    Hosken FP

    Humanist. 1984 Jan-Feb; 44(1):5-8, 45.

    Women's needs and human rights have been ignored in the ongoing political debates on family planning. It is the right of each woman to have access to contraceptives and to the essential and crucial information about reproduction and her own body's fertility and sexuality. The basic human right of every individual to choose, to decide freely, based on biological and factual information, whether or not to have children, continues to be denied to very large numbers of women. The vast majority of women in the developing world have no such options. Environmentalists and population planners continue to evade the issue, despite the price paid for this omission: the failure of many family planning programs. The correlation between "development" and population control was internationally discussed for the 1st time at the UN World Population conference in Bucharest, but not 1 word was said to show the far more convincing and clearly visible correlation between the educational status of women and declines in population growth rates. These facts continue to be ignored even today by most population experts and their funding sources, especially the US Agency for International Development (USAID). In countries where women as a group have access to education, both population growth rates and infant mortality noticeably decline. In the East and West African countries visited by this individual, it appears that family planning is making no progress. This is the case despite the fact that more and more money is spent in Africa by international family planning organizations. The primary reason why population growth is not soaring in many African countries is because infant mortality is so high, about 50% in many countries. The reason why family planning is failing in Africa is because every African man seeks to confirm his ego and his manhood by fathering as many children as possible. Male sexuality is totally out of control, not female sexuality as claimed by proponents of female circumcision and genital mutilation. There is no hope for change in settings where women are illiterate and the chattel of men. International family planning organizations, although spending millions on family planning in Africa, have entirely ignored the facts. Polygamy, as well as the failure of men to face their responsibilities for their children, are nowhere even mentioned by the international family planning establishment as reasons for the burgeoning population growth rates. Family planning programs in Africa are still almost totally directed toward women, while men--the real cause of the population growth rates--are never made to face the reality of their obligations. International family planning organizations have failed to make the information about reproduction accessible in easily comprehensive form. The "Universal Childbirth Picture Books" have been found to be easily adaptable to all environments and all cultures and explain the basic, biological facts that are shared by women everywhere.
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  21. 21
    023989

    African women blaze a trail.

    Mojekwu V

    World Health. 1984 Apr; 24-6.

    Women in 24 villages throughout Africa are participating in the World Health Organization's (WHO) African Regional Program for Women in Health Development. This program involves women's organizations in primary health care delivery through a system of self-reliant cooperatives that work for rural development. WHO's African Regional Office works with the women's organizations to identify areas where their activities could have an impact, to establish links with government officials, and in project planning and fund raising. Local thrift and credit clubs, state-run cooperative societies, traditional age-grade unions, religious groups, and market women's associations have been identified as potential points of impact. Male elders are drawn into the projects in the preliminary stage in order to break down prejudice and produce unified communalism. To prepare a project proposal, a consultant is sent to live in the village for a 3-week period to learn about the resources and expressed needs of the community. The program has emphasized training that will enable women to plan their own income-generating activities. The most difficult problem has been to motivate the involvement of national and international organizations. The ultimate objective is to turn self-development and self-reliance for promoting health-related projects into permanent features of the village women's social activities. Through the process of participating in health development, African women have realizaed their potential leadership skills and are submerging longstanding sex prejudices.
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  22. 22
    050315

    Report of women, health and development activities in WHO's programmes 1982-1983.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, [1984]. 16 p.

    This report discusses the important place of women in health and development as perceived by WHO and as formulated in various World Health Assembly resolutions, particularly those concerned with the UN Decade for Women. Underlying all objectives is that of increasing knowledge and understanding about how the various socioeconomic factors that make up women's status affect and are affected by their health. The aim of WHO's Women, Health and Development (WHD) activities, is the integration or incorporation of a women's dimension within on-oing programs, specifically as part of "Health for All" strategies. Chief among WHD objectives and groups of activities are the improvement of women's health status, increasing resources for women's health, facilitating their health care roles and promoting equality in health development. Overall WHD activities stress the importance of data on women's health status, the dissemination of this and related information, and the promotion of social support for women. The WHD component of ongoing WHO programs focuses mainly on managerial and technical support to national programs of maternal-child health/family planning care. The present report also includes an update on the incorporation of women's issues within WHO's on-going programs in human reproductive research, nutrition, community water supply and sanitation, workers' health, mental health, immunization, diarrheal diseases, research and training in tropical diseases and cancer. Women's participation in health services is discussed mainly within the context of primary health care and is based on their role as health care providers. The results of a multi-national study initiated in 1980 on the topic of women as health care providers should be ready in early 1984 and are expected to contribute a basis for further action.
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