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  1. 1
    081376

    The future for injectable contraceptives.

    Rutter T

    AFRICA HEALTH. 1993 Mar; 15(3):18-9.

    Until recently, Africa's fertility rates showed no sign of change in spite of the vast resources committed to decreasing population growth. Now there are early indications of success in parts of Nigeria, Botswana, Zimbabwe, and Kenya. In Kenya, between 1984 and 1989, total fertility fell from 7.7 to 6.7, the crude birth rate fell from 52/1000 to 46/1000, and the contraceptive prevalence rate rose from 17% to 27%. Public awareness of modern contraceptive techniques is above 70% in much of Africa, and in Kenya it is up to 90%. Injectable contraceptives are very popular. In October 1992, they were finally licensed by the United States Food and Drug Administration. Injectable contraceptives were first used in Africa in the late 1960s. They were withdrawn from the Bangladesh family planning program, and they were banned in Zimbabwe in 1981. 2 injectable contraceptives administered by deep intra-muscular injection are widely available. Depo medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) or Depo-Provera is normally given in a dose of 150 mg every 12 weeks. Norethindrone enanthate (NETEN) is given in a dose of 200 mg every 8 weeks. DMPA has been used by more than 10 million women. It is repeatedly endorsed by the WHO and the IPPF and has the lowest failure rate of any method of reversible contraception. Side effects include spotting or amenorrhoea, and rarely, menorrhagia. Injectables are suitable for women who are breast feeding, as they may even increase the quantity of breast milk. Norplant, an implanted device developed by the Population Council, releases progestogen at a low, steady rate for 5 years. There is less progestogen in a 5-year Norplant than in the 3-month dose of DMPA. The implant can be removed at any time and fertility is quickly restored. Norplant is becoming increasingly available throughout Africa.
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  2. 2
    080363

    The World Bank atlas. 25th anniversary edition.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1992. 36 p.

    This atlas presents social, economic, and environmental statistics for 200 economies throughout the world, including statistics for 15 economies throughout the world, including statistics for 15 economies of the former Soviet Union. The following social/demographic indices are presented: population growth rate, 1980-1991; under-5 mortality rate, 1991; daily calorie supply/capita, 1989; illiteracy rate, 1990; and female labor force, 1991. GNP/capita, 1991; GNP/capita growth rate, 1980-91; and shares of agriculture, exports, and investment in GDP in 1991 comprise the economic data. Finally, GDP output/kilogram energy used, 1990; annual water use and annual water use/capita, 1970-87; forest coverage, 1989; and change in forest coverage, 1980-89, are presented as economic indicators. All figures are reported in color graphic format. Technical notes and World Bank structure and functions are discussed in closing sections. The text also cautions that the differing statistical systems and data collection methods and capabilities employed internationally demand that caution be taken against directly comparing statistical coverages and definitions.
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  3. 3
    076548

    1991 ESCAP population data sheet.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]. Population Division

    Bangkok, Thailand, ESCAP, Population Division, 1991. [1] p.

    The 1991 Population Data Sheet produced by the UN Economic and social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) provides a large chart by country and region for Asia and the Pacific for the following variables: mid-1991 population, average annual growth rate, crude birth rate, crude death rate, total fertility rate, infant mortality rate, male life expectancy at birth, female life expectancy at birth, % aged 0-14 years, % aged 65 and over, dependency ratios, density, % urban, and population projection at 2010. 3 charts also display urban and rural population trends between 1980 and 2025, the crude birth and death rates and rate of natural increase by region, and dependency ratios for 27 countries.
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  4. 4
    073744

    Fertility trends and prospects in East and South-East Asian countries and implications for policies and programmes.

    Leete R

    POPULATION RESEARCH LEADS. 1991; (39):1-17.

    Fertility trends and prospects for east and southeast Asian countries including cities in China, Taiwan, the Republic of Korea, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Myanmar, and Viet Nam are described. Additional discussion focuses on family planning methods, marriage patterns, fertility prospects, theories of fertility change, and policy implications for the labor supply, labor migrants, increased female participation in the labor force (LFP), human resource development, and social policy measures. Figures provide graphic descriptions of total fertility rates (TFRS) for 12 countries/areas for selected years between 1960-90, TFR for selected Chinese cities between 1955-90, the % of currently married women 15-44 years using contraception by main method for selected years and for 10 countries, actual and projected TFR and annual growth rates between 1990-2020 for Korea and Indonesia. It is noted that the 1st southeast Asian country to experience a revolution in reproductive behavior was Japan with below replacement level fertility by 1960. This was accomplished by massive postponement in age at marriage and rapid reduction in marital fertility. Fertility was controlled primarily through abortion. Thereafter every southeast Asian country experienced fertility declines. Hong Kong, Penang, Shanghai, Singapore, and Taipei and declining fertility before the major thrust of family planning (FP). Chinese fertility declines were reflected in the 1970s to the early 1980s and paralleled the longer, later, fewer campaign and policy which set ambitious targets which were strictly enforced at all levels of administration. Korea and Taiwan's declines were a result of individual decision making to restrict fertility which was encouraged by private and government programs to provide FP information and subsidized services. The context was social and economic change. Indonesia's almost replacement level fertility was achieved dramatically through the 1970s and 1980s by institutional change in ideas about families and schooling and material welfare, changes in the structure of governance, and changes in state ideology. Thailand's decline began in the 1960s and is attributed to social change, change in cultural setting, demand, and FP efforts. Modest declines characterize Malaysia and the Philippines, which have been surpassed by Myanmar and Viet Nam. The policy implications are that there are shortages in labor supply which can be remedied with labor migration, pronatalist policy, more capital intensive industries, and preparation for a changing economy.
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