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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    325638

    The world's women 2005: Progress in statistics.

    United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Statistics Division

    New York, New York, United Nations, 2006. [175] p. (ST/ESA/STAT/SER.K/17)

    The World's Women 2005: Progress in Statistics focuses on the state of statistics for addressing gender concerns. It reviews the current availability of national data and assesses progress in data reporting from 1975 to 2003, based on the information that national statistical authorities report to the international statistical system. The statistics reviewed include those related to population, health, education and work. Also reviewed in the report is the current state of statistics in some of the relatively newer areas, namely violence against women; poverty; power and decision-making; and human rights. The focus on official national statistics, as differentiated from internationally prepared estimates, reveals the extent to which Governments are able to produce statistics to address various gender concerns. By so doing, the report provides Governments with the means to assess progress, identify gaps and design strategies to improve the national collection and dissemination of gender statistics needed for policy formulation and programme planning and evaluation. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    303250

    Trends of female mortality from cancer of the breast and cancer of the genital organs.

    Pascua M

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 1956; 15:5-41.

    The author reviews that mortality statistics from cancer of the breast in females and from malignant neoplasms of the uterus and of the other female genital organs for nineteen countries over the years 1920-53, first considering the general trend of the mortality series for each group of diseases for all ages and then analysing for each sector of mortality the changes which have occurred in the age-specific death-rates in some pivotal years during the same period. Considerable differences in the levels of total mortality from each group of tumours for various countries are noted. The important variations among age-specific death-rates for cancer of the breast in females and for uterine neoplasms in various countries are examined and their significance is commented upon. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    272300

    A randomized comparative study of interval insertion of three intrauterine devices: the copper T 220c, the Nova T and the WHO levonorgestrel 2 ug IUD.

    Gao J; Wu SC; Song GY; Miao L; Cheng JH; Sun HZ

    [Unpublished] 1985 May. 5 p. (Project: 82901)

    The objective is to compare the effectiveness and acceptability of 3 IUDs inserted in 300 health women, aged 24-38. All have had at least 1 full-term delivery. Subjects were randomly allocated to 1 of the 3 IUDS: the Copper T 220C (Tcu 220c), the Nova T, and the World Health Organization levonorgestrel 2 ug IUD. Insertion was done from the 3rd to the 5th day of menstruation between Feb. and Sept. 1984 and followed up at 48 hours, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after IUD insertion. 12 month data was collected for cumulative rates, based on life table procedures and analyzed with log-rank test. There was no loss to follow up and no insertion failure. All levonorgestrel IUDs have been removed because the levonorgestrel-releasing IUD has a relatively high risk of ectopic pregnancy. The use-related discontinuation rates of Tcu 220c, Nova T, and levonorgestrel IUD during 12 months of use, were 11.1, 2.4, and 12.7, respectively. The difference between Tcu 220c and Nova T were statistically significant (p.<0.01). The continuation rates of Tcu 220c, Nova T, and levonorgestrel during 6 months of use were 94.0, 99.0, and 96.0, respectively. During 12 months of use, they were 88.9, 97.6, and 87.3 respectively. 1 ectopic pregnancy occurred with the levonorgestrel IUD after 7 months of use. No pregnancy occurred in Nova T users. The pregnancy rates of Tcu 220c and levonorgestrel IUD during 12 months of use were 1.0 and 1.3, respectively. Removal rates for bleeding with Tcu 220c and levonorgestrel IUD during 12 months of use were 3.1 and 1.0, respectively. The removal rate for pain with Tcu 220c during 12 months of use was 2.0. The duration of bleeding and spotting with 3 IUDs, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months of use are illustrated. Preliminary results show that the Nova T is superior to Tcu 220c and levonorgestrel IUDs. Expulsion is the main event in both Nova T and Tcu 220c. More attention should be paid to the insertion technique. The duration of bleeding and spotting of levonorgestrel IUD were longer in the last 3 months after insertion, but was shortest at 1 year of use when compared with Tcu 220c and Nova T.
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  4. 4
    785327

    Women and decision-making in the World Food Programme.

    Wilson-Ercoli D

    In: Nicol D, Croke M, eds. The United Nations and decision-making: the role of women. Vol. 2. New York, UNITAR, 1978. 169-75.

    An examination of the breakdown by sex and grade level of the professional staff of the World Food Programme from 1974-1977 indicated there was little or no improvement in the role and position of women in the program during that period. In 1974, 12 of the 74 professional staff members at the organization's headquarters were women, and in 1977, 13 of the 87 professional staff positions were held by women. Thus there was a decline in the proportion of women professional staff members from 16.2% to 14.99. In regard to the professional field staff, in 1974 there was 1 woman and 113 men and in 1977 there were 3 women and 133 men. Furthermore, throughout the 1974-1977 period no woman held top, or 5th professional grade level, positions and only 1 woman held a 4th grade level position. During the same period the number of men in 5th grade level positions increased from 11-15 and the number of men in 4th grade level positions increased from 22-25. Recruitment policies tended to reinforce this discriminatory pattern. Male professional staff members were actively recruited from the outside and were usually young and educated. In contrast women acquired professional status on the basis of their many years of service and experience in general service level jobs. For the most part they were older and less educated than the males recruited from the outside and were not in a position to compete with the men for the top positions. This finding led to the suggestion that efforts should be made by the program to encourage member governments to recruit young, educated women from the outside to fill professional grade 4 and 5 positions in the future.
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  5. 5
    751781

    World population, women aged 15-44, and women at risk by IPPF regions.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Evaluation and Social Sciences Department

    (London, IPPF), May 1975. 15 p.

    Population data was gathered by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) to use for budgetary purposes. Statistical population tables are presented for 222 countries grouped into 8 large regions. The tables show: total population, growth rates and birthrates for the countries and regions for each year since 1970. Based on these figures, projections for 1976 are made. The number of women in the 15-44 year age group for each country and region is given. A standard formula yields the number of women at risk, correcting for sterile couples, sexually inactive women, and those not having 3 children yet. IPPF figures are compared with the latest United Nations projections.
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  6. 6
    731740

    Overview 1972: medical and clinical activities, family planning associations, western hemisphere region, January 1 - December 31, 1972.

    Gutierrez HF

    New York, International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region, Medical Division, 1973. 103 p

    Information submitted by governmental programs and by International Planned Parenthood Federation member associations is compiled in this study and the analyzed data is summarized in the form of graphs, tables, etc. with the aim of providing a basis for comparison of the family planning associations in the Western Hemisphere region. This study essentially focuses upon the number and classification of attended visits and contraceptive services. The following statistics are presented: 1) clinics--number and categories, 2) female population of fertile age, 3) total number of visits, first visits, and revisits by method, 4) new acceptors by method, 5) hours devoted to contraceptive service, 6) male and female sterilizations. Analytical information is offered on the following: 1) new acceptors per female population of fertile age, 2) new accumulated acceptors for the same population subgroup, 3) average new acceptors per year, 4) contraceptive service per medical hours, 5) revisits per first visits, 6) percentage by total number of visits, and 6) percentage by methods for new accumulated acceptors. The countries included in the study are Antigua, Argentina, Barbados, Bermuda, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Montserrat, Netherlands Antilles; Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Puerto Rico, St. Kitts-Nevis-Anguilla, St Lucia, St. Vincent, Trinidad and Tobago, United States, Uruguay, and Venezuela.
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