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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    188740

    WHO multi-country study on women's health and domestic violence against women.

    Jansen H

    [Unpublished] 2003. Presented at the Second South African Gender Based Violence and Health Conference, Johannesburg, South Africa, May 9, 2003. [29] p.

    [Objectives of the Multi-country Study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence Against Women include]: Obtain valid estimates of prevalence of violence against women in several countries; Document the associations between Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and health variables; Identify risk and protective factors for domestic violence against women, and compare them within and between settings; Explore and compare the strategies used by women who experience domestic violence Develop and test new instruments for measuring violence cross-culturally; Increase national capacity amongst researchers and women’s organizations working on violence; Increase sensitivity to violence among researchers, policy-makers and health providers; Promote new ethic/model of research. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    182794

    Primary and secondary infertility in Tanzania.

    Larsen U

    Journal of Health and Population in Developing Countries. 2003 Jul 2; [15] p..

    The trend and predictors of infertility are not well known in sub-Saharan Africa. A nationally representative Demographic and Health Survey (TDHS) was conducted in Tanzania in 1991/92, 1996 and 1999, enabling a trend study of infertility. Logistic regression was used to determine the predictors of infertility. The prevalence of primary infertility was about 2.5%, and secondary infertility was about 18%. There was no change between the 1991/92, 1996 and 1999 TDHS. The risk of primary infertility was higher in the Dar es Salaam and Coast regions than in other regions and secondary infertility was higher in the Dar es Salaam region. The Dar es Salaam and Coast regions are known for also having elevated levels of HIV/AIDS. Because sexual practices and sexually transmitted diseases are strong predictors of pathological infertility and HIV infection in Africa, we recommend that concerted efforts be made to integrate the prevention of new incidences of infertility with the HIV/AIDS campaigns. (author's)
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  3. 3
    178051

    Changing the focus.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. HIV and Development Programme

    New York, New York, UNDP, [2000]. 4 p.

    There is also a need for greater insight into why and how men and women enter into sexually-defined spaces and relations. For women, this may have to do with cultural imperatives which place high value on mother-hood and on the continuation of the lineage. Or the reason may have to do with economic imperatives, an inability to survive economically without the support of a man or except by commercial sex work. Or with a desire for the intimacy or companionship which a sexual relationship may give them or with a need for protection, a critical social role that men play. A women-centered analysis of desire and sexuality, of power and its impact, of relations of production and reproduction, of the social construction of kinship and gender, of the value of compassion and solidarity, that is, of the experience of being a woman, all contribute to a better understanding of why, for an individual woman, it may be so very difficult to remain uninfected. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    095052

    More women infected by AIDS virus.

    FUTURIST. 1994 Mar-Apr; 28(2):62-3.

    HIV is infecting more and more women. By the year 2000, according to the World Health Organization [WHO], more than 13 million women will be infected and at least 4 million will have died from AIDS. 10 years ago, few women and children were infected with HIV, but now they are WHO's main concern. Between 1991 and 1992, the number of US women infected with HIV increased 10%. In sub-Saharan Africa, more women are infected with HIV than men (6:5). Between 1983 and 1993, the HIV infection rate among pregnant women at prenatal clinics in Malawi increased from 3 to 30%. WHO research shows that women are more vulnerable to HIV infection than men. Women are biologically more likely to become infected with HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) because they have more mucosal surfaces exposed during sexual intercourse. Women are inclined to have sexual intercourse with older men, who tend to have had many sexual partners, which thereby puts them at high risk of HIV infection. In many cultures, traditional sexual difficult for women to use protection against STDs. WHO recommends that women-centered sex education and family planning programs continue. It also calls for men-centered programs which promote condom usage and respect for a woman's wishes concerning intercourse.
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