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Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    166315

    Health education, an important aspect of population education.

    Gurumurthy G

    In: Population studies (lectures on population education), [compiled by] Sri Venkateswara University. Population Studies Centre. Tirupati, India, Sri Venkateswara University, Population Studies Centre, 1979. 41-50.

    This paper highlights the importance of health education in population education. Definition of health, as well as, the objectives of health education in the prospects of the WHO is presented in this paper. Furthermore, it focuses on the different aspects of health education, namely: personal hygiene and environmental sanitation; maternal and child health; nutrition education; applied nutrition program; school health education; transmission of diseases and cultural practices; national health programs; age at marriage of women and health; and population explosion and health hazards.
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  2. 2
    080184

    Integration of population education in APPEAL. Volume Three. Population education in literacy and continuing education.

    UNESCO. Principal Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific [PROAP]

    Bangkok, Thailand, UNESCO, PROAP, 1992. [3], 115 p. (Population Education Programme Service)

    Workshops were conducted in 1989 and 1991 in Indonesia and Pakistan to discuss the integration of population education into primary school curricula and into continuing education and literacy programs. This document provides a summary of prototype materials for integration of population messages in nonformal education. On-site visits were conducted in the rural villages of Sinar Bakti and Sari Harapan in the eastern district of Lembang, and 24 semi-literate persons were interviewed on demographic information, knowledge, attitudes, practices in family planning, problems and solutions, and aspirations. Workshop participants drafted materials with the help of resource persons, and 1 flip chart, 1 chart, and 2 booklets were field-tested. The core messages were that mother and child health care promotes family welfare; there is a right age for marriage; children can be spaced; women should be allowed to obtain a higher education; educated mothers add to family quality of life; women's groups can be effective; and rapid population growth leads to water shortages. Each of these messages for semi-literates is further differentiated by format, specific objectives, materials, messages and submessages. For example, a flip chart with 11 pictures is developed for stimulating discussion on the benefits of improving women's educational status. The instructions for facilitators are to direct learners to study the pictures and read the text and then direct questions about the messages in the pictures. Learners are expected to explain the pictures and text and draw conclusions. The learning materials from Pakistan were developed based on a needs assessment approach. Interviewers visited houses and asked for knowledge and attitudes on messages about small family size and social welfare, the right marriage age, responsible parenthood, population and development, reorientation of population-related beliefs and values, and enhancement of the status of women. The results of the inquiries are given. An example of these issues is represented in teaching materials for reorienting beliefs on the right marriage age. The target would be out-of-school youths and adults. The focus would be on how 1) early marriage affects the health of the mother and child, and 2) young mothers are not mentally prepared for the consequences of frequent pregnancies. A puppet show is provided as well as a guide for facilitators of discussion.
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  3. 3
    006986

    Women and population: an overview of UNFPA-supported projects with particular reference to women.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]. Policy and Technical Division. Women and Youth Section

    New York, UNFPA, 1980 Jul. 77 p.

    An overview of the examples of project types funded by the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) are presented along with a list of approved projects on women, population development, and a partial list of pending projects with particular reference to women. In choosing these examples of the UNFPA supported projects, the primary objective was to provide the reader with an indication of the wide range of project activities supported by the Fund. The following projects are reviewed: maternal and child health care and family planning; special programs for women; basic population data collection; population dynamics; formulation and evaluation of population policies and programs; implementation of policies and programs; communication and education; and related population and development activities in the 1980's. The UNFPA is increasingly working to include women in the development and strengthening of maternal and child health family planning systems--their management and evaluation, and including the development and application of fertility regulation methods. It is helping countries find ways and means for the reeducation of men and women on the importance of shared responsibility and authority in family planning decisions. Examples of approved maternal and child health care and family planning projects in Algeria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brazil, Costa Rica, Egypt, Jordan, Kenya, Morocco, Somalia, and the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen are briefly described. To ensure increased participation of women and their contribution to population/development related activities, the Fund created a new category of special programs for women. Programs in this category are generally classified as "status of women."
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  4. 4
    112819

    Integrating reproductive health including family planning and sexual health in community education programmes. Follow-up to ICPD: seventh ICEA conference.

    UNFPA COUNTRY SUPPORT TEAM FOR EAST AND SOUTH-EAST ASIA NEWSLETTER. 1995 Aug; 3(2):10.

    Between July 30 and August 4, 1995, 538 people from 41 countries attended the Seventh International Community Education Association (ICEA) World Conference in Jomtien, Thailand. The National Education Commission, Ministry of Education, Government of Thailand, UNFPA, UNDP, and UNICEF jointly organized the seventh ICEA. The UNFPA's Executive Director sent a message to the participants informing them that the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) Programme of Action adopted ICEA's call for governments to expand access by girls and women to secondary and higher levels of education and training before the year 2015. UNFPA organized a double-session Workshop on Population Education with Special Reference to Reproductive Health, Girl Child and Adolescent Education. Issues addressed during the workshop included the need to reconceptualize population education and to integrate population education into community education programs with the help of UNFPA country offices, reproductive health, HIV/AIDS, family planning, youth education, and contraceptive counseling. UNFPA also organized a subplenary session on Population, Health and Sustainable Development. This session reaffirmed ICPD's recommendations on achieving reproductive health and socioeconomic goals: education of the girl child, education and services for adolescents, increasing trend of HIV/AIDS transmission, maternal health and high maternal mortality, reproductive rights, and empowerment of women. The UNFPA Country Support Team for East and South-East Asia and the UNFPA Country Office for Thailand jointly held an exhibition of publications and activities at the conference.
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  5. 5
    111182

    First professional meeting for TSS / CST advisors on population IEC and population education. 17-21 October, 1994, UNFPA / UNESCO, Paris. [Proceedings].

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    [Unpublished] 1994. [300] p.

    In October 1994, UNFPA technical support services (TSS) and country support team (CST) advisors attended a meeting on population IEC (information, education, and communication) in Paris, France, to become updated on IEC and population education. The notebook provided to all participants contains the meeting agenda. The agenda had sessions on the latest trends in population IEC, applying research effectively in IEC and population education, the program approach (implications for IEC), implications of UNFPA support to family planning/IEC, counseling skills training and interpersonal communication, application of knowledge and policies in the area of youth, male involvement in reproductive health, reconceptualization of population education, gender issues and girls education, participatory approaches and community involvement, innovative methodologies for school-based population education, and new information technologies. The notebook also has a list of participants categorized by CST team, TSS team, UNFPA headquarters, and consultants/resource persons. The bulk of the notebook is composed of resource papers addressing topics of the various sessions and related IEC/population education issues.
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  6. 6
    071765

    Programme of activities 1992. Programmes d'activites pour 1992.

    Centre for African Family Studies [CAFS]

    Nairobi, Kenya, CAFS, 1992. 27 p.

    Described in this document are the courses and other activities of the Center for African Family Studies (CAFS), a training institution established by the African Regional Council of the International Planned Parenthood Federation. CAFS's programs include: 1) training courses aimed at developing program management skills, providing updates on contraceptive technology, disseminating information on family planning and population, and outlining appropriate IEC strategies; 2) seminar and consultations for opinion leaders and policy makers on population issues, including Women and Health issues; 3) research to strengthen family planning and population programs; and 4) workshops to produce teaching materials. The document describes the objectives and contents of the 17 courses offered by CAFS in 1992, as well as its research agenda. Also described are 9 additional courses offered in French.
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  7. 7
    042591

    An evaluation of Pathfinder's early marriage education program in Indonesia, November-December 1984.

    Dornsife C; Mahmoed A

    Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, Pathfinder Fund, 1986 Feb. 41 p. (Pathfinder Fund Working Papers No. 4)

    Indonesian government officials determined in the early 1970's that an increase in marriage age as well as in the use of contraceptives would be needed to reduce the country's growth rate. In 1974, the Marriage Law Reform Act increased the minimun marriageable age, but compliance was rare. In 1981, Pathfinder initiated a campaign to address this. The 1st objective was to educate influentials (e.g. religious leaders). The 2nd objective was to gather information and promote discussion of societal norms that lead to early marriage and childbearing. The underlying assumptions were that non-compliance arose from a lack of knowledge about the marriage law and that norms promoting early marriage and fertility were amenable to change. The program reviewed in this working paper covers 6 projects with 5 prominent Indonesian organizations--3 women's groups, a national public health association, and a branch of the Family Planning Coordinating Board. The activities began with national seminars to discuss objectives. National and local-level activities followed, ranging from the publication of a national bulletin to training marriage counselors. Women's groups incorporated the education program into their ongoing functions. Program effects were widespread. Evaluators' assessment in 1984 found that the controversial topic of adolescent fertility has been intensively discussed at national and local levels. Their recommendations include: focusing work on large-impact organizations, evaluation of certain projects, support for various projects, concentrating on key issues. The training project management should be integrated into Pathfinder's schedule. Studies should be performed to make sure this desin is not too ambitious. Baseline data should be incorporated. The 2-year approach should be extended to 5, since the impact of marriage age legislation will not be felt for several years.
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  8. 8
    268447

    Report on the evaluation of the UNFPA-supported women, population and development projects in Indonesia (INS/79/P20 and INS/83/P02) and of the role of women in three other UNFPA-supported projects in Indonesia (INS/77/P03, INS/79/P04, and INS/79/P16).

    Concepcion MB; Thein TM; Simonen M

    New York, New York, United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA], 1984 Apr. vi, 52 p.

    The Evaluation Mission analyzes and assess the 2 United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA)-supported Women, Population and Development Projects and the role of women in 3 other UNFPA-assisted projects in Indonesia. The Mission concluded that the family planning and cooperative/income generation scheme as evolved in the 2 projects has contributed to increasing contraceptive acceptance and continuation and to a shift from the less reliable to the more reliable contraceptive methods. The projects have also assisted women and their families to expand their income generating activities, raise their incomes, and improve the family's standard of living. The Mission recommends that: 1) more diversified income producing activities be encouraged; 2) product outlets be identified and mapped and appropriate marketing strategies devised; 2) loan repayment schedules be carefully examined; 4) data collection, monitoring and evaluation be streamlined and strenghthened; and 5) the process of the entire rural cooperatives/income generation scheme be more comprehensively documented. In the 3 other projects, which are addressed to both men and women, the needs and concerns of women have not been adequately taken into account and/or the participation of women in all phases of the projects and their access to project benefits have not been equal to men. The Mission therefore recommends that special consideration be given to women's concerns in the design and formulation of all projects. The Mission ascertained that non-women specific projects tend to perpetuate existing discriminatory or unequal access to, and control of, resources by women unless specific consideration is accorded to them.
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  9. 9
    007288

    Afghanistan: report of Mission on Needs Assessment for Population Assistance.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    New York, UNFPA, 1978 Jun. 53 p. (Report No 3)

    The present report presents the findings of the Mission which visited Afghanistan from October 3-16, 1977 for the purpose of assessing the country's needs for population assistance. Report focus is on the following: the national setting (geographical, cultural, and administrative features; salient demographic, social, and economic characteristics of the population; and economic development and national planning); basic population data; population dynamics and policy formulation; implementing population policies (family health and family planning and education, communication, and information); and external assistance (multilateral and bilateral). The final section presents the recommendations of the Mission in detail. For the past 25 years Afghanistan has been working to inject new life into its economy. Per capita income, as estimated for 1975, was $U.S. 150, a relatively low figure and heavily skewed in favor of a very small proportion of the population. The country is still predominantly rural (85%) and agricultural (75%). In the absence of reliable data, population figures must be accepted tentatively. According to the 7-year plan, the population in 1975 was 16.7 million and the rate of growth around 2.5% per annum. The crude birth rate is near 50/1000 and the crude death rate possibly 25/1000. The Mission endorses the priority given by the government to the population census and recommends continued support on the part of the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) to help the Central Statistical Office in the present effort and in building up capacity for future work. The Mission recommends that efforts be concentrated on the reduction of infant, child, and maternal mortality levels and that assistance be continued to the family health services and to programs of population education. Emphasis should be on services to men and women in rural areas. The Mission also recommends a training program for traditional birth attendants.
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  10. 10
    025861

    Action programmes for the qualitative improvements of population education: report of a Regional Consultative Seminar, Bangkok, Thailand, 11-18 Oct. 1982.

    UNESCO. Population Education Programme Service

    Bangkok, Thailand, Unesco, Regional Office for Education in Asia and the Pacific, 1983. 102 p.

    The main objectives of this seminar were: 1) to provide opportunities for countries to share population education experience; and 2) to develop action programs for the improvement of these programs at the national and regional levels in the formal and nonformal sectors. 27 participants from southeast Asian and Oceania plus observers from international organizations took part. Developments, trends and analysis of problems in population education are discussed. A number of awareness and commitment activities have been carried out. Planning and management of population education programs was discussed, as was reconceptualization of curriculum and materials development. Personnel were trained in formal and nonformal education. There is a need for population education programs for special groups--such as women who face greater fertility risk, and the disadvantaged living in rural and urban slums. Evaluative research needs to address remedial action. The institutionalization of population education is a goal which every country has set. Much remains to be done in the way of documentation and information exchange. Relevant population education components should be integrated not only into formal education, but also with programs in literacy and adult education, rural development, community development, health and nutrition, skill developments and women's development. The goals of the regional program for the development of population education are: 1) to promote among all persons connected with the educational process an understanding of population issues and decision-making processes, attitudes and behavior in regard to population issues; 2) to provide technical advice to members. Of 44 countries, only 20 have on-going population education programs. Some recommendations are: 1) that a regional workshop in developing a mechanism for resource sharing and information exchange be established; and 2) that an ongoing translation program be developed.
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  11. 11
    064720

    PEAS evaluation research. Population Education in the Agricultural Sector.

    DEEMAR

    Bangkok, Thailand, DEEMAR, 1983 Nov. [8], 27, [27] p. (UNFPA/FAO Project THA/83/PO4; J.9616)

    This evaluation research reports on the effectiveness of the Thai learning program for 500 civil servants who then incorporate the population education into their jobs as trainers. A sample of 100 trainers representing 6 provinces and regions were evaluated for content and process of integration information, for innovative approaches, for identifying systems which facilitate integration, and for identifying bottlenecks. Informal contact and monthly meetings or already formal groups have been the vehicles for transmission of information. Horizontal integration among staff and co-workers is high as well as among villagers in vertical integration. No follow-up is made after contact and little active participation occurs after POPED. In order to expand contact with the rural population, more training among middle management position needs to be addressed within the organization. Interorganization is overall 86%. The most talked about topics among villagers were population growth and natural resources (86%), age at marriage (81%), population density and land distribution (79%), and nutrition (70%). The most difficult topics were migration (21%), planning for a family (13%), economic and social consideration in marriage (14%), and sex of children (14%). Trainers perceived family planning in general as the most important topic and key to the success of the effort.
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