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  1. 1
    303250

    Trends of female mortality from cancer of the breast and cancer of the genital organs.

    Pascua M

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 1956; 15:5-41.

    The author reviews that mortality statistics from cancer of the breast in females and from malignant neoplasms of the uterus and of the other female genital organs for nineteen countries over the years 1920-53, first considering the general trend of the mortality series for each group of diseases for all ages and then analysing for each sector of mortality the changes which have occurred in the age-specific death-rates in some pivotal years during the same period. Considerable differences in the levels of total mortality from each group of tumours for various countries are noted. The important variations among age-specific death-rates for cancer of the breast in females and for uterine neoplasms in various countries are examined and their significance is commented upon. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    111014
    Peer Reviewed

    The third age, the Third World and the third millennium.

    Diczfalusy E

    CONTRACEPTION. 1996 Jan; 53(1):1-7.

    In the year 2000, world population will exceed 6200 million and life expectancy will be over 68 years. The UN population projections for the coming 20 years after 1996 range from a low of 7100 million to a high of 7800 million. Between 1950 and 1992, in developing countries, life expectancy at birth increased by 29 years in China, by 24 years in India and Indonesia, by 21 years in Bangladesh, and by 16 years in Brazil. The gender difference in life expectancy is only 1 year in India, but 6 years in a number of developed countries. Corresponding increases in Australia were from 12.2 to 14.7 years for men and from 14.9 to 18.8 years for women. By the year 2025, the UN projects that the elderly (65 years and older) will constitute 10% of the population in Asia and more than 20% in North America and Europe, whereas 1.8% of the population of Asia, 4.6% of North America, and 6.4% of Europe will be very old (80 years and older). By the year 2030, there may be 1200 million postmenopausal women around the world, 76% of them in the developing countries. During the period 1990-2025 the elderly population of Sweden will increase by 33%, whereas that of Indonesia will increase by 414%. Between 2000 and 2100, the global population aged 15 years or younger will gradually decrease from 31.4% to 18.3%, while the population aged 65 and over will increase from 6.8% to 21.6%. The persistence of poverty in developing countries combined with aging poses a formidable challenge because the majority of old people receive little special support. The epidemiological dimension of aging embraces mortality and morbidity. Each year 39 million people die in the developing world mainly from infectious and parasitic diseases, noncommunicable and communicable diseases, and injuries. In the developed countries 11 million die primarily from cardiovascular diseases and malignant neoplasms. In the developing countries noncommunicable diseases represent 87% of the disease burden resulting in increased isolation of the elderly. The ethical dilemma facing health care is poverty among the elderly.
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