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  1. 1
    337070

    Hormonal contraceptive methods for women at high risk of HIV and living with HIV. 2014 guidance statement. Recommendations concerning the use of hormonal contraceptive methods by women at high risk of HIV and women living with HIV.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, 2014. [16] p. (WHO/RHR/14.24)

    During 9-12 March 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) convened a meeting of the Guideline Development Group (GDG) comprising 52 individuals representing a wide range of stakeholders, for the purpose of reviewing, and where appropriate, revising its Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use, fourth edition (MEC) guidance. Recommendations concerning the use of hormonal contraceptive methods by women at high risk of HIV and women living with HIV, including women taking antiretroviral therapy (ART), were among the many topics reviewed at this meeting. Given the public health importance of this topic, and at the encouragement of the GDG, the World Health Organization is issuing its contraceptive eligibility guidance for women at high risk of HIV and women living with HIV in advance of the entire guideline revision. It is anticipated that the revised fifth edition of the MEC will be completed in 2015. Recommendations for hormonal contraceptive use are provided for: women at high risk of HIV infection; women living with asymptomatic or mild HIV clinical disease (WHO stage 1 or 2); women living with severe or advanced HIV clinical disease (WHO stage 3 or 4); women living with HIV using antiretroviral therapy (ART). In addition to the recommendations themselves, this publication provides a description of the background and methods used in their development. An executive summary and information on dissemination and evaluation are also included. (Excerpts)
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  2. 2
    299432
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO statement on hormonal contraception and bone health.

    Contraception. 2006 May; 73(5):443-444.

    Steroid hormonal contraceptives, including oral contraceptives, injectables and implants, are highly effective and widely used. These contraceptives have important health benefits, including contraceptive and noncontraceptive benefits, and some health risks. For most women, the health benefits of use clearly exceed the health risks. Questions have been raised regarding the association between use of one particular hormonal contraceptive, depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and the risk of bone loss. In response, WHO convened a consultation in Geneva, on June 20-21, 2005, to assess current evidence on the relationship between the use of steroid hormonal contraceptives and bone health. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    008967

    Present status of Noristerat worldwide.

    Hoppe G

    Injectable Contraceptives Newsletter. 1982 Apr; (9):1-2.

    Noristerat is the trade name for a long-acting injectable contraceptive. It is a formulation of Norethisterone enanthate (NET-OEN) in 4 parts of Benzobenzoate and 6 parts of castor oil. The active principle of the drug is Norethisterone which is released from intramuscular depot following hydrolysis of the enanthate side-chain by unspecified tissue. NET-OEN is registered at this time in 36 European, African, Asian, Central and South American countries. Extensive ongoing clinical trials have been and are being carried out by several international organizations including the World Health Organization (WHO). Extended preclinical drug safety testing has been carried out in the U.S. The 1st pilot studies with NET-OEN were performed in 1958; regular clinical studies were started in October 1964. Peru was the 1st country to register and market NET-OEN, followed by Chile, Brazil, and Argentina. When toxicity studies revealed breast and liver tumors in rats NET-OEN was discontinued worldwide. Up to 1973 further toxicological studies had been completed in monkeys. These studies could not demonstrate any pathological effects on the experimental animals. Thus, NET-OEN was released again for further studies in February 1973. Investigations revealed that the development of mammarian and hepatic tumors in rats were not restricted to NET-OEN and could be provoked by administration of other substances. It was concluded that the findings in rats cannot be applied to humans. Schering's toxicological studies on NET-OEN include acute toxicity studies, chronic drug safety studies, and combined drug safety and carcinogenicity studies. With regard to the profile of endocrine activity, NET-OEN has been shown to have progestational and no estrogenic activity in humans. Clinical trials with NET-OEN have been performed in more than 20 different countries, and WHO has conducted 2 multi-center studies on long-acting injectable contraceptives comparing NET-OEN with medroxyprogesterone acetate. The data on use-effectiveness obtained from the 1st WHO study showed a higher failure rate for NET-OEN, i.e., 3.6/100 woman years, but a markedly better tolerance for NET-OEN was found. WHO began a 2nd multicenter trial in February 1976 with a modified application scheme. The results obtained thus far showed that by using these modified application schemes the contraceptive reliability of NET-OEN greatly increased.
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