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  1. 1
    081522

    Report of WHO Consultation on Maternal and Perinatal Infections, 28 November - 2 December 1988.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Division of Family Health. Programme of Maternal and Child Health and Family Planning

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Division of Family Health, Programme of Maternal and Child Health and Family Planning, 1991 Dec. [3], 122 p. (WHO/MCH/91.10)

    This WHO consultation on maternal and perinatal infections reviews the epidemiology of these infections, examines the effectiveness of known intervention strategies to prevent and treat these infections, notes gaps in current knowledge, and develops recommendations for implementation of appropriate control strategies. The report is geared toward maternal and child health professionals in developing countries where maternal and perinatal infections cause considerable morbidity and death. These countries have limited resources for health care (e.g., US $5-10/person), largely due to the worsening economic situation. The report centers on the feasibility, effectiveness, and cost of interventions to prevent, treat, and control the infections. It has summary cost-effective analyses of maternal and perinatal infections and proposed interventions using 3 different hypothetical country situations to help policymakers decide on priorities and policies on prevention, treatment, and control of these infections. The report dedicates a chapter to each infection (syphilis, neonatal tetanus, malaria, hepatitis, HIV infections, chlamydial infections, herpes simplex infection, Group B Streptococcal infections, and maternal genital infection causing premature birth and low birth weight). Each chapter addresses their clinical and public health significance; prevalence in pregnant women and transmission from mother to fetus/infant; clinical effects; prevention, treatment, and control; and cost effectiveness and feasibility of various interventions. Based on public health importance, feasibility, and affordability, the consultants agreed that national and international programs should place the highest priority on these perinatal infections: gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum, maternal and congenital syphilis, neonatal tetanus, hepatitis B, and maternal puerperal infections.
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  2. 2
    097262

    Prevention of infertility.

    In: Challenges in reproductive health research: biennial report 1992-1993, edited by J. Khanna, P.F.A. Van Look, P.D. Griffin. Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction, 1994. 161-6.

    The UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Program of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction is conducting research on the subsequent fertility of women admitted to hospital with clinically suspected pelvic infection. Results available so far suggest that fertility up to 24 months after the original hospitalization is adversely affected to a degree which is proportional to the severity of the disease. Findings from a study treating 112 oligozoospermic men with mesterolone will be published in 1994. The program made significant progress in its research on the development of a simple diagnostic test specific for acute chlamydial infection of the genital tract. The test is based upon the detection of a secretory immunoglobulin A antibody specific to Chlamydia. As for condom preference, a study found male sex workers in Thailand engaged in sexual networks involving male and female clients and girlfriends. The female condom received favorable feedback from women at high risk of sexually transmitted disease (STD) transmission in Zimbabwe, as well as from their clients and steady partners. A study of approximately 300 female prostitutes in Bangkok found only 2% opting for condoms lubricated with silicone oil compared to 86% opting for condoms lubricated with nonoxynol-9. Past STD infection in selected groups, gynecological health, and chlamydial vaccine research are discussed.
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  3. 3
    090651

    Approaching STDs and AIDS on a global scale. Interview with Peter Piot, Associate Director, Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Global Programme on AIDS (GPA), World Health Organisation (WHO).

    AIDS BULLETIN. 1993 Jul; 2(2):4-5.

    Dr. Piot became involved with the World Health Organization (WHO) Global Program on AIDS (GPA) through his early involvement as Chairman of the WHO Steering Committee on the Epidemiology of AIDS. He responds to questions about the HIV pandemic. Although researchers realized early on that HIV could be transmitted sexually and suspected that condom use could confer protection against HIV infection as it does against other STDs such as gonorrhea and syphilis, only minimal light was shed to the public on the association of HIV with STDs. The delay in clearly pointing out the association stemmed from professionals' lack of desire to further stigmatize HIV/AIDS by designating it as a STD. Furthermore, many Western hematologists had little interest in STDs, and STD control in many countries tended to be coercive. Regarding the risk of HIV infection, Dr. Piot notes that the presence of a genital ulcer caused by syphilis, chancroid, or herpes increases one's risk 10-20-fold; risk increases 3- to 4-fold where gonorrhea or chlamydia are present. Acknowledging the association between STDs and the risk of contracting HIV and understanding the need to control STDs for the prevention of HIV/AIDS, the WHO's STD program was brought under the auspices of and integrated with the GPA. People, and especially women, who may present at STD clinics for treatment are prime candidates for much needed help in avoiding HIV infection; Dr. Piot notes that unlike men, many women do not realize they are infected with an STD until complications develop. Dr. Piot's recent appointment at GPA means the WHO will increase its focus upon the prevention and treatment of STDs. The WHO favors an integrated program approach. Additionally, the GPA plans to develop a short-list of recommended drugs for treating STDs and hopes to develop ways for developing countries to buy them affordably with help from UNICEF and the World Bank. Finally, Dr. Piot explains that, with some exceptions, the prevalence of STDs is lower in developed countries and, therefore, less of a prevention priority.
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