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Your search found 9 Results

  1. 1
    183948

    [Activities of the Oficina Provincial de la Mujer for the prevention of adolescent pregnancies continue] Siguen actividades de la Mujer en prevencion de embarazos en adolescentes.

    Logros. 1999 Nov-Dec; 4(1):9.

    The Provincial Office for Women, in coordination with the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), has given several workshops for mayors, health workers, political leaders, agronomists, and others. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    049402

    Plan of action for the eradication of harmful traditional practices affecting the health of women and children in Africa.

    Inter-African Committee [IAC]

    [Unpublished] 1987. 14 p.

    The traditional and harmful practices such as early marriage and pregnancy, female circumcision, nutritional taboos, inadequate child spacing, and unprotected delivery continue to be the reality for women in many African nations. These harmful traditional practices frequently result in permanent physical, psychological, and emotional changes for women, at times even death, yet little progress has been realized in abolishing these practices. At the Regional Seminar of the Inter-African Committee on Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children in Africa, held in Ethiopia during April 1987, guidelines were drawn by which national governments and local bodies along with international and regional organizations might take action to protect women from these unnecessary hazardous traditional practices. These guidelines constitute this "Plan of Action for the Eradication of Harmful Traditional Practices Affecting the Health of Women and Children in Africa." The plan should be implemented within a decade. These guidelines include both shortterm and longterm strategies. Actions to be taken in terms of the organizational machinery are outlined, covering both the national and regional levels and including special support and the use of the mass media. Guidelines are included for action to be taken in regard to childhood marriage and early pregnancy. These cover the areas of education -- both formal and nonformal -- measures to improve socioeconomic status and health, and enacting laws against childhood marriage and rape. In the area of female circumcision, the short term goal is to create awareness of the adverse medical, psychological, social and economic implications of female circumcision. The time frame for this goal is 24 months. The longterm goal is to eradicate female circumcision by 2000 and to restore dignity and respect to women and to raise their status in society. Also outlined are actions to be taken in terms of food prohibitions which affect mostly women and children, child spacing and delivery practices, and legislative and administrative measures. Women in the African region have a critical role to play both in the development of their countries and in the solution of problems arising from the practice of harmful traditions.
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  3. 3
    170613

    Future generations ready for the world. UNFPA's contribution to the goals of the World Summit for Children.

    Raj R

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2001. 27 p.

    This paper summarizes UN Population Fund's (UNFPA) contribution to the goals of the 1990 World Summit for Children. It notes that UNFPA has focused on four major areas of work addressing young people: promoting girls' education, the promotion of adolescent reproductive and sexual health, HIV/AIDS prevention, and the reduction of maternal mortality and morbidity.
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  4. 4
    115790
    Peer Reviewed

    Population and women's reproductive health: an international perspective.

    Miller K; Rosenfield A

    ANNUAL REVIEW OF PUBLIC HEALTH. 1996; 17:359-82.

    This overview describes current growth in the population of the world as well as the momentum which keeps populations expanding even after fertility rates decline. This background information precedes a discussion of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) which includes the preparatory activities, the position of the ICPD in the context of previous decennial population conferences, major innovations included in the Program of Action, and the process used to reach consensus. The following six major reproductive health concerns which arose from the ICPD are then considered: gender inequality; access to contraceptive services; sexually transmitted disease (including HIV/AIDS) prevalence, health effects, and programmatic effects; maternal mortality; unsafe abortion; and adolescent pregnancy. It is concluded that the ICPD was of enormous significance because it managed to gain consensus on some of the most controversial topics in the area of reproductive health and to mirror some of the most pressing population problems of the decade. The major drawback of the Program of Action is seen as the fact that its success will depend upon the political and financial will of governments.
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  5. 5
    070480

    The health of mothers and children: key issues in developing countries.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    IN POINT OF FACT 1990 Sep; (70):1-4.

    About 50% of children <1 year old in developing countries die during the 1st month of life, and 97% of all infant deaths occur in developing countries. Major factors contributing to these deaths are the mother's poor health before and during pregnancy, unhygienic childbirth practices, and inadequate care after delivery. Low birth weight, linked to mother's health, is considerably related to survival and development and growth. >500,000 women in developing countries die annually due to pregnancy and childbirth. Maternal mortality risk in the poorest countries can be 200 times that of developed countries. Inappropriate timing and spacing, too many pregnancies, unsafe abortion, and insufficient prenatal care and care during delivery contribute to high maternal mortality in developing countries. Mothers <18 years old are at the highest risk of pregnancy complications, delivering a premature infant, and/or death. Postponement of marriage and better access to family planning would improve their and their infants chances of survival. Access to and acceptability of family planning promotes the health of women and children. Literate women and their children are healthier than those of illiterate women. A trained person attends only 20% of births in developing countries. Increasing the number of deliveries with a trained attendant and increasing immunizations of mothers with the tetanus toxoid will greatly reduce mortality. Infants leaving the uterus experience a drop in ambient temperature from 37 to 20 degrees Celsius. If they are not dried off, covered in a dry cloth, and/or allowed to be in physical contact quickly, they can experience considerable heat loss or even death. Further all infants should be exclusively breastfed for 4-6 months to ensure healthy growth and development and to provide protection against infections.
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  6. 6
    061890

    The UNFPA contribution: theory to action programmes.

    Sadik N

    Development. 1990; (1):7-12.

    A study carried out by the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) confirmed that teenage pregnancy and childbearing have a substantial adverse effect on young women's health, education, and employment opportunities. In developing countries, most women carry onerous workloads, including food preparation, childcare, domestic agricultural labor, and often employment in the formal or informal sector. These multiple roles have significant implications for the life choices made by young women and their prospects for self-fulfillment outside of the family context. The UNFPA is committed to development activities that enable young girls to avoid too early and too closely spaced pregnancies, keep them in school longer, and provide them with access to adequate reproductive health care. There must be greater awareness of the impact of young women's reproductive and productive choices on their performance as co-architects of future societies--a task that is difficult in developing societies where early marriage and childbearing are promoted and parents are not motivated to invest in the education of daughters. Even family planning programs in Third World countries often ignore teenagers as a target group for services because of the taboo against premarital sexual activity. Many UNFPA-assisted projects now focus on educating the public and national opinion leaders about the health risks involved in very early pregnancy and childbirth as well as their longterm impact on socioeconomic well-being. whether channelled through the formal school system or the community, these projects seek to involve young people themselves in the planning and implementation of services intended to meet their needs. UNFPA has also supported conferences of international women leaders and provided funds for research on adolescent sexuality.
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  7. 7
    042591

    An evaluation of Pathfinder's early marriage education program in Indonesia, November-December 1984.

    Dornsife C; Mahmoed A

    Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, Pathfinder Fund, 1986 Feb. 41 p. (Pathfinder Fund Working Papers No. 4)

    Indonesian government officials determined in the early 1970's that an increase in marriage age as well as in the use of contraceptives would be needed to reduce the country's growth rate. In 1974, the Marriage Law Reform Act increased the minimun marriageable age, but compliance was rare. In 1981, Pathfinder initiated a campaign to address this. The 1st objective was to educate influentials (e.g. religious leaders). The 2nd objective was to gather information and promote discussion of societal norms that lead to early marriage and childbearing. The underlying assumptions were that non-compliance arose from a lack of knowledge about the marriage law and that norms promoting early marriage and fertility were amenable to change. The program reviewed in this working paper covers 6 projects with 5 prominent Indonesian organizations--3 women's groups, a national public health association, and a branch of the Family Planning Coordinating Board. The activities began with national seminars to discuss objectives. National and local-level activities followed, ranging from the publication of a national bulletin to training marriage counselors. Women's groups incorporated the education program into their ongoing functions. Program effects were widespread. Evaluators' assessment in 1984 found that the controversial topic of adolescent fertility has been intensively discussed at national and local levels. Their recommendations include: focusing work on large-impact organizations, evaluation of certain projects, support for various projects, concentrating on key issues. The training project management should be integrated into Pathfinder's schedule. Studies should be performed to make sure this desin is not too ambitious. Baseline data should be incorporated. The 2-year approach should be extended to 5, since the impact of marriage age legislation will not be felt for several years.
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  8. 8
    012196
    Peer Reviewed

    Nutritional anemia: its understanding and control with special reference to the work of the World Health Organization.

    Baker SJ; DeMaeyer EM

    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1979 Feb; 32(2):368-417.

    Since 1949, the World Health Organization, recognizing the public health importance of nutritional anemia, has sponsored efforts directed towards its understanding and control. During this period, often as a result of the work of the Organization, advances have been made in many areas. Basic understanding of iron, folate, and vitamin B12 nutrition, and the various factors which may influence the availability and requirements of these factors, has greatly increased. Surveys in a number of countries have highlighted the widespread prevalence of nutritional anemia, particularly in developing countries. The major factor responsible is a deficiency of iron, with folate deficiency also playing a role in some population groups, especially in pregnant women. There is increasing evidence that anemia adversely affects the health of individuals and may have profound socioeconomic consequences. Control of nutritonal anemia is possible by providing the deficient nutrient(s) either as therapeutic supplements or by fortification of commonly used foodstuffs. Some control programs are reviewed and suggestions for further action are outlined. The Organization still has an important role to play in this field, encouraging the development of control programs and providing advice and technical assistance to member countries. (author's)
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  9. 9
    037684

    Planned parenthood and women's development: lessons from the field.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, Eng., International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1982. 67 p.

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