Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 55 Results

  1. 1
    374608

    Women’s labour migration: an overview from Mexico, Moldova and the Philippines.

    United Nations. UN Women

    New York, New York, UN Women, [2017]. 7 p. (Policy Brief No. 1)

    UN Women’s project "Promoting and Protecting Women Migrant Workers’ Labour and Human Rights: Engaging with International, National Human Rights Mechanisms to Enhance Accountability" is a global project funded by the European Union (EU) and anchored nationally in three pilot countries: Mexico, Moldova, and the Philippines. The project promotes women migrant workers’ rights and their protection against exclusion and exploitation at all stages of migration. One of the key results of the project has been the production of high-quality knowledge products. These have provided the foundation of the project’s advocacy and capacity building objectives. This Brief draws from the project’s knowledge products and provides an overview of the key situational and policy concerns for women migrant workers in each of the three pilot countries.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    389294
    Peer Reviewed

    The global challenge to improve the sexual and reproductive health of women affected by FGM/C.

    McCauley M

    BJOG. 2018 Feb; 125(3):288.

    Against a background of an increasing demand for surgical intervention for the treatment of FGM/C related complications, Berg et al Note for typesetter: Please update reference when assigned to an issue. have conducted a systematic review of 62 studies involving 5829 women, to assess the effectiveness of defibulation, excision of cysts and clitoral reconstructive surgery. Berg et al report that defibulation showed a lower risk of Caesarean section and perineal tears; excision of cysts commonly resulted in resolution of symptoms; and clitoral reconstruction resulted in most women self-reporting improvements in their sexual health. However, Berg et al highlight that they had little confidence in the effect estimate for all outcomes as most of the studies were observational and conclude that there is currently poor quality of evidence on the benefits and/or harm of surgical interventions to be able to counsel women appropriately. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    379044
    Peer Reviewed

    Response to 'WHO classification of FGM omission and failure to recognise some women's vulnerability to cosmetic vaginal surgery'

    Cox L

    Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care. 2017 Feb 24; 1.

    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    351761
    Peer Reviewed

    Care and the 53rd Commission on the Status of Women: a transformative policy space?

    Bedford K

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2011 Nov; 19(38):197-207.

    In March 2009, UN member states met at the 53rd Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) to discuss the priority theme of "the equal sharing of responsibilities between women and men, including caregiving in the context of HIV/AIDS". This meeting focused the international community's attention on care issues and generated Agreed Conclusions that aimed to lay out a roadmap for care policy. I examine how the frame of "care" - a contested concept that has long divided feminist researchers and activists - operated in this site. Research involved a review of documentation related to the meeting and interviews with 18 participants. Using this research I argue that the frame of care united a range of groups, including conservative faith-based actors who have mobilized within the UN to roll back sexual and reproductive rights. This policy alliance led to important advances in the Agreed Conclusions, including strong arguments about the global significance of care, especially in relation to HIV; the need for a strong state role; and the value of caregivers' participation in policy debates. However, the care frame also constrained debate at the CSW, particularly about disability rights and variations in family formation. Those seeking to reassert sexual and reproductive rights are grappling with such limitations in a range of ways, and attention to their efforts and concerns can help us better understand the potentials and dangers for feminist intervention within global policy spaces. Copyright (c) 2010 UNRISD. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    350101

    Turning gender and HIV commitments into action for results: an update on United Nations interagency activities on women, girls, gender equality and HIV.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], UNAIDS, 2009 Dec. 4 p.

    In September 2000, 189 UN Member States committed to achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by 2015. Among these goals is a commitment to promoting gender equality and empowering women and combating HIV, malaria, and other diseases. Today, almost 10 years on, addressing gender inequality and AIDS remains the most significant challenge to achieving the MDGs, as well as broader health, human rights, and development goals. This update highlights key 2009 interagency initiatives, all of which operate at the intersection of gender equality, women's empowerment, and HIV.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    321700

    Supporting gender justice in Afghanistan: opportunities and challenges.

    Mantovani A

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 8 p.

    For 25 years war raged in Afghanistan, destroying both the institutional fiber of the country and its justice system. Even in the period before the wars, the justice system had only managed to impose itself sporadically. Disputes that arose had to be resolved, for the most part, through informal religious or tribal systems. However acceptable some of the main laws may have been technically, they were offset by various factors: the poor training of judges, lawyers and other legal workers; decaying infrastructures; and ignorance of the law and basic rights by common citizens and even the judges themselves. The prison system had suffered even greater damages. Its infrastructure and organization were in ruins. Today enormous efforts have been mobilized to build a fair and functioning system that is respectful of human rights and international standards. It will take years for the Afghan government and people to do the job-with the help of the international community. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    321694

    Panel 4. Introductory remarks.

    McDougall G

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 5 p.

    When wars occur, women are usually the most abused, aggrieved and powerless. In the vast majority of countries, women play no significant role in the decision-making process of whether war is warranted or lawful. When hostilities break out, women are exposed not only to the forms of violence and devastation that accompany any war but also to forms of violence directed specifically at women on account of their gender. The use of sexual violence and sexual slavery as tactics and weapons of war remains at a high level in spite of tremendous strides made by the global community over the past decade. It is imperative to acknowledge the immeasurable injury to body, mind and spirit that is inflicted by these acts. The overall deterioration in the conditions of women in armed conflict situations is due not only to the collapse of social restraints and the general mayhem that armed conflict causes, but also to a strategic decision on the part of combatants to intimidate and destroy the enemy as a whole byraping and enslaving women who are identified as members of the other warring party. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    321693

    Breaking the silence -- rape as an international crime.

    Ellis M

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 5 p.

    In 1999, I stood among a sea of 20,000 desperate people on a dirt airfield outside Skopje, Macedonia, listening to one harrowing story after another. I had come to the Stenkovec refugee camp to record those stories and to help set up a system for documenting atrocities in Kosovo. The refugees with whom I spoke described being robbed, beaten, herded together and forced to flee their villages with nothing but the clothes they were wearing. Yet, what I remember most vividly are the lost expressions on the faces of the young women and girls in the camp. At first, they did not speak a word. Their silence acted as a veil, concealing crimes that they could not emotionally recollect. However, slowly, through time and comfort in speaking to female counsellors, their stories emerged. The brutality and systematic consistency of the sexual violence perpetrated on these women were mind-numbing. The widespread practice of rape against Muslim women was more than a consequence of war, it was an instrument of war with the intent of destroying the cultural fabric of a targeted group. This experience brought home to me a truism in international and national conflict: women suffer disproportionately to the atrocities committed against civilians. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    321411
    Peer Reviewed

    Achieving transparency in implementing abortion laws.

    Cook RJ; Erdman JN; Dickens BM

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2007 Nov; 99(2):157-161.

    National and international courts and tribunals are increasingly ruling that although states may aim to deter unlawful abortion by criminal penalties, they bear a parallel duty to inform physicians and patients of when abortion is lawful. The fear is that women are unjustly denied safe medical procedures to which they are legally entitled, because without such information physicians are deterred from involvement. With particular attention to the European Court of Human Rights, the UN Human Rights Committee, the Constitutional Court of Colombia, the Northern Ireland Court of Appeal, and the US Supreme Court, decisions are explained that show the responsibility of states to make rights to legal abortion transparent. Litigants are persuading judges to apply rights to reproductive health and human rights to require states' explanations of when abortion is lawful, and governments are increasingly inspired to publicize regulations or guidelines on when abortion will attract neither police nor prosecutors' scrutiny. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    304448
    Peer Reviewed

    Women forced into sterilisation protest to UN.

    Krosnar K

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 2006 Aug 26; 333(7565):410.

    A group of Czech Roma women who said that they were forcibly sterilised have, on 17 August, outlined their stories in person to a United Nations committee in New York. They hope this will exert pressure on the Czech government to apologise. On the same day, many Roma women staged a protest outside a hospital in the east of the Czech Republic to raise awareness for their cause. About 30 women carrying banners stating "we want children" and "sterilise gherkins not women" protested outside the municipal hospital in Ostrava in an attempt to get a public apology from the government. A report by the Czech ombudsman released several months ago found that at least 50 women had been unlawfully sterilised as recently as 2003. Eighty women had lodged complaints with the ombudsman, alleging they underwent operations to be sterilised against their will. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    296418

    Security Council focuses on women, peace and security. [El Consejo de Seguridad se centra en la mujer, la paz y la seguridad]

    UN Chronicle. 2004 Sep-Nov; 41(3):[3] p..

    The participation of women is a key variable in achieving sustainable peace and security. Having recognized this principle in its resolution on women, peace and security, the Security Council, during a working roundtable meeting at the Rockefeller Foundation on the 1 July, discussed the concrete implications of resolution 1325 (2000) on their daily activities. The Permanent Missions of Canada, Chile and the United Kingdom to the United Nations and the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security co-sponsored this roundtable with Council members. The discussion focus built on the recommendations developed at the first roundtable held in January 2004. In his opening remarks, Ambassador Lauro L. Baja, Jr. of the Philippines stated: "We cannot lose sight of women's concerns in the reconstruction processes. Sustainable and durable peace can only be achieved when women's concerns and contributions are incorporated in every aspect of rebuilding the peace, including social and economic reconstruction." (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    286905

    Conference in Amsterdam explores correlation between reproductive rights and culture.

    Population 2005. 2004 Jun; 6(2):15.

    A conference titled, “Cairo and Beyond: Reproductive Rights and Culture” was organized by the Dutch government and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) on International Women’s Day, March 8th in Amsterdam. The event concluded with a pledge to “break the silence and taboos on culture and religion and their relation to reproductive and sexual health and rights,” by Agnes van Ardenne, Dutch Minister for Development Cooperation and Thoraya Ahmed Obaid, Executive Director of UNFPA. They also promised “to establish a permanent dialogue on these vital issues.” Over 100 experts from around the world attended the event and participants agreed that although progress has been made in the ten years since the 1994 ICPD in Cairo, many substantial challenges still remain. The conference focused specifically on those challenges related to the interconnections between culture and reproductive rights. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    286564

    Reproductive health conference urges wider use emergency contraception.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction

    Progress in Reproductive Health Research. 1995; (35):8.

    Emergency contraception should be available to all women who wish to use it, according to a recent conference of reproductive health specialists. In a consensus statement the group asserted that “millions of unwanted pregnancies could be averted” if emergency contraceptives were widely accessible. The conference called for further research on antiprogestogens for emergency contraceptive use. Emergency contraceptives are methods that women use after intercourse to prevent pregnancy. Several methods are known to be safe and effective, including higher doses of regular combined ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel contraceptives (the Yuzpe regimen) and the copper intrauterine device (IUD). Levonorgestrel may also be used, and mifepristone (an antiprogesterone drug that supresses ovulation and can inhibit implantation of the fertilized ovum in the uterus wall) is currently being studied to ascertain the optimal dose. “Any woman at risk of unwanted pregnancy may need these methods occasionally,” conference delegates agreed. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    277663

    [The practice guideline 'Hormonal contraception' (second revision) from the Dutch College of General Practitioners; a response from the perspective of obstetrics and gynecology] De standaard 'Hormonale anticonceptie' (tweede herziening) van het Nederlands Huisartsen Genootschap; reactie vanuit de verloskunde-gynaecologie.

    Knuist M; Hamerlynck JV

    Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Geneeskunde. 2004 Jun 26; 148(26):1274-1275.

    The Dutch College of General Practitioners' (NHG) guideline on hormonal contraception does not follow the WHO criteria for the use of oral contraceptives in contrast to the guideline of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Contrary to the WHO criteria, the NHG guideline considers a blood-pressure measurement before starting with an oral contraceptive to be unnecessary. It also considers no form of migraine to be contraindication for oral contraceptives. The NHG guideline further disclaims the (slightly) increased risk of developing breast cancer in women using oral contraceptives. It advises initiation of oral-contraceptive use two weeks postpartum in non-breast-feeding women and six weeks postpartum in breastfeeding women, instead of the three weeks and six months, respectively, indicated in the WHO guideline. Lastly, the NHG guideline is too optimistic as to the reliability of oral-contraceptive use, as no distinction is made between efficacy and effectiveness. Such discrepancies between two Dutch guidelines can be detrimental to women's health care. The WHO criteria for contraceptive use may be a valuable tool to overcome differences of opinion to as to achieve a badly needed full consensus. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    275666
    Peer Reviewed

    The members' enquiry service: frequently asked questions.

    Stephen G; Brechin S; Penney G

    Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care. 2004; 30(4):253-254.

    The Clinical Effectiveness Unit (CEU) presents an illustrative response of a frequently asked question to the Members’ Enquiry Service on whether or not hormonal contraceptive use by women with a history of pregnancy-related cholestasis is safe or associated with recurrence of cholestasis. The Summaries of Product Characteristics (SPCs) for combined oral contraceptives (COCs) and progestogen-only pills (POPs) advise against use by women with a history of cholestatic jaundice or with severe pruritis in pregnancy. The World Health Organization (WHO) Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (WHOMEC), however, recommends that for women with pregnancy-related cholestasis the benefits of COC use outweigh the risks (WHO Category 2) and progestogen-only methods or non-hormonal methods can be used without restriction (WHO Category 1). No evidence was identified to support an increased risk of recurrence of symptoms with hormonal contraceptive use. The CEU advises that women with a history of pregnancy-related cholestasis should be informed about the unknown risk of recurrence with hormonal contraceptive use. After counselling regarding non-hormonal methods, women with a history of pregnancy-related cholestasis may choose to use hormonal methods (COCs, POPs, progestogen-only injectables, implant or intrauterine system). Women should be informed that the use of COCs and POPs in this situation is outside the product licence. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    191973

    Ensuring women's access to safe abortion care in Europe.

    Ipas

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Ipas, 2003. [2] p.

    This document compiles facts and recommendations for action to prevent maternal mortality from unsafe abortion, ensure legal abortion is safe and accessible to all women, put legal abortion and postabortion care within reach of all women throughout health systems, and review laws and policies that place women’s lives in danger or contain punitive measures against women who have undergone illegal abortion. These essential steps to protect women’s health and guarantee their human rights — endorsed by the world community over the past decade — require concerted action from health systems, professional associations, parliamentarians, women’s organizations and all relevant stakeholders. Implementing safe, legal abortion services, removing barriers to existing services, and informing the public about where they can obtain abortion care are key measures to ensure safety and access to abortion in order to safeguard women’s health. The material included here is drawn from the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), the Fourth World Conference on Women, the corresponding 5-year reports on progress, and the UN Millennium Goals. The most recent estimates of public health impact of abortion in the region are also included. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    187219

    Declaration of intentions of the IPPF European Network, Brussels, 27 June 2003.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. European Network

    Choices. Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights in Europe. 2003 Autumn; 35.

    Reaffirms the human rights basis of sexual and reproductive rights and the need to preserve, guarantee and expand these rights for all peoples in Europe and around the world; underlines its commitment to prioritise the human rights approach to sexuality and reproduction in all activities of the federation; recalls that sexual and reproductive rights are already the subject of international human rights law, jurisprudence, treaties and conventions; reaffirms that the IPPF Charter on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights outlining 12 rights provides the framework for work in progressing towards the full recognition of sexual rights as human rights; welcomes the recognition of other civil society groups of the human rights basis of their specific work in sexuality, reproduction, health and equality. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    187531
    Peer Reviewed

    Gender and HIV / AIDS.

    Turmen T

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2003 Sep; 82(3):411-418.

    The impact of gender on HIV/AIDS is an important dimension in understanding the evolution of the epidemic. How have gender inequality and discrimination against women affected the course of the HIV epidemic? This paper outlines the biological, social and cultural determinants that put women and adolescent girls at greater risk of HIV infection than men. Violence against women or the threat of violence often increases women’s vulnerability to HIV/AIDS. An analysis of the impact of gender on HIV/AIDS demonstrates the importance of integrating gender into HIV programming and finding ways to strengthen women by implementing policies and programs that increase their access to education and information. Women’s empowerment is vital to reversing the epidemic. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    182281

    HIV-infected women and their families: psychosocial support and related issues. A literature review.

    Lindsey E

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Department of Reproductive Health and Research, 2003. vi, 57 p. (Occasional Paper; WHO/RHR/03.07; WHO/HIV/2003.07)

    This review is divided into three sections. Section one provides a synthesis of the reviewed literature on prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV, voluntary HIV testing and counselling (VCT), and other issues that impact on the care, psychosocial support and counselling needs of HIV-infected women and their families in the perinatal period. Section two provides examples from around the world of projects that focus on the care and support of women and families, with a focus on MTCT. The fi nal section contains recommendations on psychosocial support and counselling for HIV-infected women and families. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    180437
    Peer Reviewed

    Cyprus: hands across the divide. A case study in bi-communal, cross-border activism.

    Loizou G

    Women and Environments International. 2003 Spring; (58-59):43-47.

    Hands Across the Divide (HAD) is a newly formed NGO linking women of northern Turkish-speaking Cyprus and southern Greek-speaking Cyprus. It is unique, the first of its kind in Cyprus, and the first bi-communal Cypriot organization to gain international recognition. So total is the Cypriot partition, that it is legally impossible to register a bi-communal organization in Cyprus as a single organization. So the women of HAD went to London to register. Despite all the barriers to communication across the Green Line, the women of HAD are carrying out joint actions for peace. While the northern HAD women are sharing in the massive demonstrations in the north, the Greek Cypriot members of Hands Across the Divide have started their own action in the south. Cyprus now faces entry to the European Union bringing new urgency to the question of reunification and peace. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    180424
    Peer Reviewed

    The postwar moment: lessons from Bosnia Herzegovina.

    Cockburn C

    Women and Environments International. 2003 Spring; (58-59):6-8.

    There are two main lessons that can be learned from the Bosnian experience. First, it is absolutely vital that a gender analysis from the very outset is placed at the heart of peacekeeping operations or postwar reconstruction. It should be main-streamed so that everyone, not just women, not just gender focal points, but everyone thinks about the gender realities of the war and of peace. Second, local women's NGOs must be consulted, befriended, made partners with the international community and have equal rights in the process. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    724425

    Fortieth report and accounts, 1971-1972.

    Family Planning Association [FPA]

    London, FPA, 1972. 48 p.

    Currently, public authorities pay for almost 2/3 of the family planning consultations conducted by the Family Planning Association, and this is the most significant development since the publication of the last Family Planning Association Report. Additionally, more local health authorities are operating direct clinic and domiciliary services. The Family Planning Association handed over the management of 39 clinics to public authorities in the 1971-1972 year. However, despite this progress, family planning service provision by public authorities throughout England continues to be uneven in quality and extent. Spending by local health authorities for each woman at risk varies from 1 penny per woman at risk in Burnley (excluding the city of London) to 179 pence at Islington. In addition to the problem of inconsistency in spending, there appears to be no immediate prospect of a comprehensive family planning service - one that is available to all, is free of charge, and is backed by an adequate education campaign. Although government help for the extension of domiciliary family planning service is impressive, it should not obscure the false economies in spending on other contraceptive delivery services such as general practitioners, specialist clinics, and specialized advisory centers. Until the government announces the details of its plans for family planning services within the National Health Service beginning April 1974, the Family Planning Association's own detailed planning cannot be exact. The Association's basic policy continues to be to turn over the responsibility for the management of clinic and domiciliary contraceptive services as quickly and as smoothly as possible to the public authorities. Already there is concern that some clinic services managed by public authorities may become less attractive, particularly to young people, and that differences in the quality of service will increase under local public management as well as that backup services will be neglected. Also existing is the realization that the public authorities do not do enough to attract people to the use of contraception.
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    170721

    Bosnia: sex trade claims spread.

    Harbin JP

    London, England, Institute for War and Peace Reporting, 2002 Aug 21. 3 p. (Balkan Crisis Report No. 360)

    In Bosnia, the Virginia-based Barents organization is hit by allegations that its workers were using prostitutes. This news article reports the allegations of Edin Zundo, a Bosnian personal driver for a Barents IT manager before he was dismissed; that he was sacked from the US-backed development project in Sarajevo after expressing discomfort at ferrying around prostitutes for the manager. The allegation comes in the wake of other cases involving western companies operating in Bosnia and Herzegovina facing accusations against staff using prostitutes, as well as a major controversy over the UN's alleged involvement in the Balkan sex trade.
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    170284

    A resource book for working against trafficking in women and girls, Baltic Sea region. 3rd ed.

    Kvinnoforum

    Stockholm, Sweden, Kvinnoforum, 2002 Feb. 87 p.

    This third edition of the Resource Book for Working Against Trafficking in Women and Girls in the Baltic Sea Region serves as a useful tool for different actors working against trafficking in and around the area. It presents a global overview on what trafficking is about, introduces the networking projects conducted by Kvinnoforum and its partner organizations in six countries in the Baltic Sea Region, and provides contacting details and work of organizations, governmental institutions and others in the six countries.
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    170210

    Making the transition work for women in Europe and Central Asia.

    Lazreg M

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1999 Dec. viii, 113 p. (World Bank Discussion Paper No. 411; Europe and Central Asia Gender and Development Series)

    This collection of papers was selected from the proceedings of the World Bank conference held on June 7-8, 1999 in Washington District of Colombia. The conference entitled, "Making the Transition Work for Women in Europe and Central Asia," underlined the importance of gender as a factor influencing change during the shift from a command to a market economy. Women, who were invited to the conference, from Europe spoke directly to the World Bank about their problems and to make suggestions for action. In addition, scholars from the US and Britain were also invited to express their views on the gender dimension of transition. It was pointed out that the transition is taking place without the input of women, who are consequently suffering from the change. The participants also agreed the changes also caused men to engage in domestic violence, thus causing additional problems for women. The feminization of poverty and trafficking in women were also identified as new problems that demand to be addressed. In view of these problems, the participants advised that reforms were necessary but should proceed with caution.
    Add to my documents.

Pages