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Your search found 18 Results

  1. 1
    305507

    Statement by Regional Director Carmen Barroso at the 36th Session of the Commission on Population and Development, United Nations, New York, 2 April 2003.

    Barroso C

    New York, New York, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], Western Hemisphere Region [WHR], 2003 Apr 2. [3] p.

    In a speech before the 36th Session of the U.N. Commission on Population and Development in New York on 2 April 2003, Carmen Barroso, Regional Director of IPPF/WHR, emphasized the paramount importance of comprehensive sexuality education for young people, and urged the United Nations to give it much greater attention in its future program of work in the area of population. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    300099

    The transnationalization of gender and reimagining Andean indigenous development.

    Radcliffe SA; Laurie N; Andolina R

    Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society. 2003 Winter; 29(2):387-416.

    This essay aims to advance feminist debates around globalization in a number of directions. By means of a transnational perspective that takes gender into the heart of the analysis, the essay challenges the erasure of gender from grand theories of globalization, leaving gender difference as merely a local effect of globalization (Freeman 2001). Following path-breaking work, we share the feminist view that globalization is inherently gendered and multiply produced by diverse actors in varied times and spaces and that its theorization has often been implicitly masculine. Our definition of transnationalism owes much to feminist work on globalization, which stresses the complex topographies of political-economic-social and cultural transformations at interconnected scales (the body, the national, and international) that comprise "globalization" (Katz 2001; Nagar et al. 2002; Radcliffe, Laurie, and Andolina 2002). Andean development transnationalism rises to the feminist challenge to move beyond conceptual frameworks that "implicitly construe... global as masculine and local as feminine" (Nagar et al. 2002, 1009). Compared with previous globalization analyses that took a decontextualized and institutional focus (see critique in Adam 2002), our essay delves through the national, local, and bodily scales to trace the impacts of new institutional initiatives such as gender mainstreaming and ethnodevelopment. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    286818

    34 Million Friends campaign passes $1 million mark.

    Population 2005. 2003 Jun; 5(2):16.

    The founders of the grassroots campaign “34 Million Friends of UNFPA” announced May 1 that it had raised $1 million to support the United Nations Population Fund, mostly in small donations. More than 100,000 Americans have contributed to the campaign to help replace funds withheld by the United States Administration last July. “This campaign highlights the power of individuals to make a difference,” said Thoraya Ahmed Obaid, UNFPA executive director. “It also shows that the American people support the right of all women to have quality health care and to be able to plan their families.” UNFPA will use the campaign’s first million dollars to make pregnancy and childbirth safer for women; reduce the spread of HIV/AIDS; equip hospitals with essential supplies; support adolescents and youth; and prevent and treat obstetric fistula, a debilitating condition that results from obstructed labor. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    286409

    The International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD): what the Programme of Action really says.

    Marshall E

    New York, New York, International Women's Health Coalition [IWHC], [2003]. 7 p.

    Organized efforts to address key global health challenges of relevance to women—from childhood illnesses to basic family planning—began some 40 years ago. With encouragement from business, experts, and others, the United States played a leading role in launching international health efforts, which enjoyed broad political support in the country during the Nixon, Ford, and Carter Administrations. As a result, tremendous progress has been made in international health: Global life expectancy has doubled; Children’s health has been enhanced; Maternal mortality has been reduced; Preventable diseases have been eliminated; Women’s health and rights have been lifted. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    189858
    Peer Reviewed

    [A review of breastfeeding in Brazil and how the country has reached ten months' breastfeeding duration] Reflexôes sobre a amamentação no Brasil: de como passamos a 10 meses de duração.

    Rea MF

    Cadernos de Saude Publica. 2003; 19 Suppl 1:S37-S45.

    In 1975, one out of two Brazilian women only breastfed until the second or third month; in a survey from 1999, one out of two breastfed for 10 months. This increase over the course of 25 years can be viewed as a success, but it also shows that many activities could be better organized, coordinated, and corrected when errors occur. Various relevant decisions have been made by international health agencies during this period, in addition to studies on breastfeeding that have reoriented practice. We propose to review the history of the Brazilian national program to promote breastfeeding, focusing on an analysis of the influence of international policies and analyzing them in four periods: 1975-1981 (when little was done), 1981-1986 (media campaigns), 1986-1996 (breastfeeding-friendly policies), and 1996-2002 (planning and human resources training activities backed by policies to protect breastfeeding). The challenge for the future is to continue to promote exclusive breastfeeding until the sixth month, taking specific population groups into account. (author's)
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  6. 6
    188740

    WHO multi-country study on women's health and domestic violence against women.

    Jansen H

    [Unpublished] 2003. Presented at the Second South African Gender Based Violence and Health Conference, Johannesburg, South Africa, May 9, 2003. [29] p.

    [Objectives of the Multi-country Study on Women’s Health and Domestic Violence Against Women include]: Obtain valid estimates of prevalence of violence against women in several countries; Document the associations between Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) and health variables; Identify risk and protective factors for domestic violence against women, and compare them within and between settings; Explore and compare the strategies used by women who experience domestic violence Develop and test new instruments for measuring violence cross-culturally; Increase national capacity amongst researchers and women’s organizations working on violence; Increase sensitivity to violence among researchers, policy-makers and health providers; Promote new ethic/model of research. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    185717

    N-9 not for women at high risk of HIV infection.

    Shears KH

    Network. 2003; 22(4):18.

    Spermicidcs containing nonoxvnol-9 (N-9) increase the risk of HIV infection when used frequently by women at high risk of infection, but they remain a moderately effective contraceptive option for women at low risk of infection, technical experts convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the U.S.based CONRAD Program have concluded. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    185712

    Female condom reuse issues explored.

    Smith EJ

    Network. 2003; 22(4):11.

    For female condom users, use of a new female condom for every act of sexual intercourse continues to be recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Likewise, the female condom (a potential alternative for the male condom) is approved only for one-time use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Such positions by public health experts reflect, in part, concerns that women may be unable to clean the device adequately to make its reuse safe. However, female condom reuse has been reported in a number of settings, likely because many women cannot afford to buy multiple female condoms. Recognition that reuse is occurring -- and may be acceptable, feasible, and safe in some circumstances -- led WHO to declare in July 2002 that "the final decision on whether or not to support reuse of the female condom must ultimately be taken locally." (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    188244

    Bush's other war: the assault on women's sexual and reproductive health and rights.

    International Women's Health Coalition [IWHC]

    New York, New York, IWHC, 2003. 11 p.

    Internationally and domestically, in our courts and in our schools, at the UN and on Capitol Hill, it is no exaggeration to say that the White House is conducting a stealth war against women. This war has devastating consequences for social and economic development, democracy, and human rights—and its effects will be felt by women and girls worldwide. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    188246

    The 108th Congress: more bad news for women.

    International Women's Health Coalition [IWHC]

    New York, New York, IWHC, [2003]. 10 p.

    The United States Congress is pursuing a number of misguided domestic and international policies that have profound—and profoundly counterproductive–impacts on women in the United States and around the world. Each individual action deserves attention; taken together they paint a chilling picture of Congress' willingness to sacrifice women and girls to gain political favor with those on the far right. In tandem with the Bush administration, the Republican-dominated 108th Congress is chipping away at women’s rights and health both at home and abroad. The International Women’s Health Coalition has compiled some of its most egregious actions, as a complement to our ongoing monitoring of the Bush administration (see the Bush’s Other War factsheet at http://www.bushsotherwar.com). (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    187997

    Global eye -- body blow.

    Floyd C

    Metropolis. 2003 Oct 3; [3] p..

    The defining issue of modernity is control of women's fertility. It is this question -- more than religion, politics, economics or the "clash of civilizations" -- that forms the deepest dividing line in the world today. It is a line that cuts through every nation, every people, from the highest level of organized society down to, in many cases, the divided minds and emotions of individual men and women. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    183476

    Hasta la vista, paradise.

    Deyal T

    Perspectives in Health. 2003; 8(2):26-29.

    More and more, nurses in the Caribbean have been packing their bags and heading for countries with less-than-perfect climates to get better pay and more respect. Now the region is looking for ways to keep them from leaving – and even to lure those abroad back home. (author's)
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  13. 13
    184912

    The new information technologies and women: essential reflections. [La nueva tecnología de la información y la mujer: reflexiones fundamentales]

    Bonder G

    Santiago, Chile, United Nations, Economic Commission for Latin America [ECLAC], 2003 Jul. 56 p. (CEPAL - SERIE Mujer y Desarrollo No. 39)

    Although in Latin America and the Caribbean there is growing concern to take into account the issue of gender in public policies, this process is still embryonic and fragmented in the case of economic and technological policies. The Women and Development Unit of ECLAC is therefore implementing the project "Institutionalization of gender policies within ECLAC and sectoral ministries". The objective of this project is to strengthen technical policies, strategies, tools and capacities, both within ECLAC and in selected countries of the region, in order to encourage equity between men and women in the process and benefits of development, especially with regard to economic and labour policies. One of the activities of the project, organized by the Women and Development Unit together with the International Trade Division of ECLAC and the Centre for Women's Studies and Social Gender Relations of the University of São Paulo, was a meeting of experts on "Globalization, technological change and gender equity" in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, on 5 and 6 November 2001. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the most relevant aspects of the opportunities and restrictions imposed by the processes of globalization and technological change, with the aim of proposing areas for research, as well as an agenda of public policies that would help to achieve equity. This document was presented as a background study for the discussion at the meeting of experts. It is clear from the text that the new technologies are taking us into a dizzy time of new exclusions, and that in addition to being a material reality they are also a discursive product with effects on institutions, public policies and individuals. The study reviews an extensive amount of theoretical literature, as well as most of the research concerning the inclusion and relationship of women in connection with the new information technologies and skills. This review identifies the major obstacle to reinforcing the potential positive impacts of the new technologies as the lack of information on how they, and especially computers, can help policies, and also individual women, to achieve their goals. It is also shown that we are dealing with two disconnected concepts: the information society and the information economy, and the gender perspective is presented as a means of linking them. As for the impact on social and gender equity, and the current digital divide, according to this document research is needed on more than access alone. There is patently a need for policies to regulate and democratize the new information and knowledge technologies, and it is important to analyze the collective imaginary that is being constructed around them and the different forms of subjectivity that the Internet is encouraging, within a perspective of the future and of changes in social relations. (author's)
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  14. 14
    181097

    African women are key to Africa's development.

    McCaulay M

    Monday Developments. 2003 Jul 28; 21(13):6, 8.

    The familiar image of the poor African woman with her starving child, or the woman infected with HIV, needs to give way to a more vibrant image of African women's importance in the economy and society, she said. We want you to see African women as key actors, solving problems -- over-coming poverty; obtaining an education; demanding quality health care; and insisting on peace and security-- not only for their families and communities but also as a matter of national policy," stressed Zeitlin. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    180871

    Cairo commitment must be honored.

    POPLINE. 2003 May-Jun; 25:3, 4.

    The president of the Population Institute contends that it would be "not only unacceptable but also morally reprehensible for the United States to back away" from commitments toward universal access to family planning and reproductive health. In testimony submitted to the foreign operations subcommittee of the House of Representatives Appropriations Committee, Werner Fornos, president of the Population Institute, was referring to apparent efforts by the Bush administration to reverse United States support of the Cairo Program of Action from the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    182281

    HIV-infected women and their families: psychosocial support and related issues. A literature review.

    Lindsey E

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Department of Reproductive Health and Research, 2003. vi, 57 p. (Occasional Paper; WHO/RHR/03.07; WHO/HIV/2003.07)

    This review is divided into three sections. Section one provides a synthesis of the reviewed literature on prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV, voluntary HIV testing and counselling (VCT), and other issues that impact on the care, psychosocial support and counselling needs of HIV-infected women and their families in the perinatal period. Section two provides examples from around the world of projects that focus on the care and support of women and families, with a focus on MTCT. The fi nal section contains recommendations on psychosocial support and counselling for HIV-infected women and families. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    180439
    Peer Reviewed

    The Magdalena Project: update on Magdalena Pacifica.

    Greenhalgh J

    Women and Environments International. 2003 Spring; (58-59):52.

    The Magdalena Pacifica Festival in Cali exhibited performances from some 30 Colombian companies, all of which focused on issues relating to women. The second part of the festival took place in Bogota at the invitation of Patricia Ariza, one of the most important and well-respected theatre activists in Colombia. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    180427
    Peer Reviewed

    Afghanistan women resisting: building a house with solid walls.

    Farkas S

    Women and Environments International. 2003 Spring; (58-59):15-18.

    This article presents two interviews: One with Carolyn Reicher of Canadian Women for Women In Afghanistan; the other with Sahar Saba of the Revolutionary Afghani Women's Association [RAWA].
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