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Your search found 10 Results

  1. 1
    313569
    Peer Reviewed

    Challenging the margin: Gender equality and the UN reform process.

    Kettel B

    Third World Quarterly. 2007 Jul; 28(5):871-886.

    In 2006 the Secretary General's High-Level Panel on UN Systemwide Coherence called for a dynamic new gender entity led by an Under-Secretary General. The follow-up to this recommendation is still ongoing, leaving the UN gender machinery in its current fragmented and weakened state. This enduring dilemma has its origins in bureaucratic incoherence, lack of senior management support for UN gender equality efforts, the failure of member states to support the Beijing Platform for Action, the impact of conservative regimes, and recent US dominance over the UN reform process. Is a new women's agency, with increased authority, new staffing and significantly increased resources possible, or should transnational feminists seek to establish an autonomous women's agency outside the UN system to provide better leadership for gender equality efforts world-wide? (author's)
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  2. 2
    315423

    Critiquing the MDGs from a Caribbean perspective.

    Antrobus P

    Gender and Development. 2005 Mar; 13(1):94-104.

    This article explores ways in which the MDGs can be made to work to promote women?s equality and empowerment. Drawn from the author?s extensive experience of feminist activism in the Caribbean region, it discusses strategies to improve the MDGs. Overall, as a feminist I think of the MDGs as a Major Distraction Gimmick - a distraction from the much more important Platforms for Action from the UN conferences of the 1990s, in Rio 1992 (Environment), Vienna 1993 (Human Rights), Cairo 1994 (Population), Copenhagen (Social Development) and Beijing 1995 (Women), Istanbul 1996 (Habitats), and Rome 1997 (Food), on which the MDGs are based. But despite believing this, I think it worthwhile to join other activists within women?s movements who are currently developing strategies to try to ensure that the MDGs can be made to work to promote women?s equality and empowerment. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    188246

    The 108th Congress: more bad news for women.

    International Women's Health Coalition [IWHC]

    New York, New York, IWHC, [2003]. 10 p.

    The United States Congress is pursuing a number of misguided domestic and international policies that have profound—and profoundly counterproductive–impacts on women in the United States and around the world. Each individual action deserves attention; taken together they paint a chilling picture of Congress' willingness to sacrifice women and girls to gain political favor with those on the far right. In tandem with the Bush administration, the Republican-dominated 108th Congress is chipping away at women’s rights and health both at home and abroad. The International Women’s Health Coalition has compiled some of its most egregious actions, as a complement to our ongoing monitoring of the Bush administration (see the Bush’s Other War factsheet at http://www.bushsotherwar.com). (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    181819

    The Project for Social Communication -- Peru. Proyecto para la comunicación social: Perú.

    Victoria, Canada, Communication Initiative, 2002 Dec 19. 2 p.

    Implemented in 2001 by UNICEF-Peru as part of a five-year initiative, this programme addresses the issue of children's, adolescents', and women's rights by bolstering interpersonal communication skills among public services workers, intermediaries between supply and demand (community agents, teachers, and community leaders), and families and individuals. The programme, which includes remote communities of the Andes and Amazon in its reach, draws on the use of culturally relevant and non-threatening messages to increase the participation of communities and families so they can demand that their rights be respected. Other features of the project include providing technical assistance to improve communication among those who provide basic services, and revamping the manner in which the media treats issues related to children and women's rights. (author's)
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  5. 5
    180439
    Peer Reviewed

    The Magdalena Project: update on Magdalena Pacifica.

    Greenhalgh J

    Women and Environments International. 2003 Spring; (58-59):52.

    The Magdalena Pacifica Festival in Cali exhibited performances from some 30 Colombian companies, all of which focused on issues relating to women. The second part of the festival took place in Bogota at the invitation of Patricia Ariza, one of the most important and well-respected theatre activists in Colombia. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    180427
    Peer Reviewed

    Afghanistan women resisting: building a house with solid walls.

    Farkas S

    Women and Environments International. 2003 Spring; (58-59):15-18.

    This article presents two interviews: One with Carolyn Reicher of Canadian Women for Women In Afghanistan; the other with Sahar Saba of the Revolutionary Afghani Women's Association [RAWA].
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  7. 7
    161803

    [International system of protection of the human rights of women] Sistema internacional de proteccion de los derechos humanos de las mujeres.

    Bernales Ballesteros E

    In: Derechos humanos de las mujeres. Aportes y reflexiones, [compiled by] Movimiento Manuela Ramos. Lima, Peru, Movimiento Manuela Ramos, 1998 Nov. 161-97. (Serie Mujer y Derechos Humanos 6)

    The evolution over the past few decades of international law protecting the human rights of women is described, and the international instruments designed to protect these rights are assessed from the perspective of jurisprudence. The first sections examine factors that have allowed implantation of a culture of human rights throughout the entire planet to emerge as a goal of international law, and describe some assumptions underlying the theme of human rights of women. Documents that were crucial in the evolution are then analyzed, including the UN Charter, the first instrument expressly signaling the equality of rights of men and women, and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The UN Commission on the Juridical and Social Condition of Women and the Fourth International Conference on Women in Beijing in 1995 are also discussed. Mechanisms for international protection of the rights of women are examined, including the Declaration on Elimination of Discrimination Against Women and the Convention on Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women. Other organs for protection that are discussed include the Human Rights Committee and the Committee for Elimination of Discrimination Against Women, and regional mechanisms such as the Interamerican Human Rights Commission and Court and the Interamerican Conventions on Political Rights of Women, Civil Rights of Women, and Against Gender Violence. The final section contrasts the normative development of protections for women’s human rights with actual practices, and identifies the next steps that should be taken.
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  8. 8
    158557

    [Highlights, consensuses and afterwards. Regional Seminar on "The Human Rights of Women in the World Conferences"] Cumbres, consensos y despues. Seminario Regional "Los Derechos Humanos de las Mujeres en las Conferencias Mundiales". Reuniao de cupula, consensos e depois. Seminario Regional "Os Direitos Humanos de Mulheres nas Conferencias Mundiais".

    Vasquez Sotelo R

    Lima, Peru, Comite de America Latina y el Caribe para la Defensa de los Derechos de la Mujer [CLADEM], 1996 Nov. 218, 214 p.

    The Second Regional Seminar of the Latin American and Caribbean Committee for Defense of Women’s Rights (CLADEM) was held in Lima in April 1996 on the theme of the human rights of women in the five UN international conferences from the 1992 environmental conference in Rio de Janeiro to the 1995 Beijing conference on women. Evaluation of advances achieved in the conferences was organized around the six priority interests identified by CLADEM in 1992 as the basic themes for women in the region: citizenship, sexual and reproductive rights, violence and peace, development, ethno-racial perspectives, and the environment. The work opens with reflections on the five conferences, with examination of the place of women in the structure of each conference, whether gender inclusive language was used, conceptual advances in the human rights of women, limitations of the paradigm of equality, mechanisms and resources for implementation of the various Declarations, international achievements and national realities, north-south differences, universality and cultural relativity, and challenges for the next millennium. Six presentations follow on citizenship of women as a challenge for the democracies of the region, sexual and reproductive rights, the struggle against gender violence and advances in international instruments, ethno-racial perspectives, gender and the economic rights of women, and women and the environment. Each presentation assessed progress over the course of the five international conferences, and each includes commentaries from two representatives of organizations in the region whose activities were related to the theme. The final section identifies points that should be considered and possible strategies in each of the six areas.
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  9. 9
    150877

    [Beijing + 5: the gains should be preserved] Pekin + 5: les acquis ont pu etre maintenus.

    de Sainte Lorette C

    EQUILIBRES ET POPULATIONS. 2000 Jun-Jul; (59):4-5.

    A special UN session was held in New York during June 6-10, 2000, to evaluate the progress achieved since the Beijing Conference on Women. According to Françoise Gaspard, France’s representative to the UN Commission on Women’s Rights, negotiations at the special session were particularly difficult. It is always hard to create a satisfactory conference declaration when the rule of the day is consensus. A few countries always oppose such consensus. Latin American countries, however, abandoned their former position similar to that of Iran and the Vatican to instead adopt far more progressive stances upon reproductive rights. Progress is occurring slowly. While still not enough, the conference’s final statement marks a certain number of advances in the fight against violence, women’s role in decision-making, and education, with no steps back in the areas of contraception and abortion. The resulting declaration is therefore not regressive, even though it could have been stronger. It will hopefully serve as a reference statement which nongovernmental organizations will be able to cite when reminding countries of their obligations. Countries should get together to discuss the rising level of prostitution. The important roles of NGOs and French-country involvement were also recognized during the conference, as well as the priorities of education and funding.
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  10. 10
    145570

    UNIFEM in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM]

    New York, New York, UNIFEM, [1994]. [12] p.

    This article discusses the UN Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM) program in Latin America and the Caribbean, which is undergoing major political, legal, and economic transformation. The role of UNIFEM in the region has been to help develop women's capacities to take control of their own lives by building their strengths so that they can voice their own concerns and be their own advocates. The work revolves primarily around three programs. 1) Poverty alleviation and environmental preservation -- The work of UNIFEM was focused on the areas of credit, technical and managerial training for women, appropriate agricultural practices, and women's role in food production and other income-generating activities. Environmental issues, being of special concern, are integrated throughout. 2) Citizenship and democratization -- UNIFEM aims to promote the strength and visibility of women as leaders and decision-makers at both the national and the grassroots level by becoming participants in the political process. 3) Eliminating violence against women -- Some of the most dynamic work of UNIFEM in Latin America and the Caribbean has been to broaden the concept of human rights to include women's rights and to put a stop to violence against women. This program supports direct advocacy work in shelters and women's centers, and broad-based public education programs.
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