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  1. 1
    388112
    Peer Reviewed

    Scaling up proven innovative cervical cancer screening strategies: Challenges and opportunities in implementation at the population level in low- and lower-middle-income countries.

    Holme F; Kapambwe S; Nessa A; Basu P; Murillo R; Jeronimo J

    International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 2017 Jul; 138 Suppl 1:63-68.

    The problem of cervical cancer in low- and lower-middle-income countries (LLMICs) is both urgent and important, and calls for governments to move beyond pilot testing to population-based screening approaches as quickly as possible. Experiences from Zambia, Bangladesh, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua, where scale-up of evidence-based screening strategies is taking place, may help other countries plan for large-scale implementation. These countries selected screening modalities recommended by the WHO that are within budgetary constraints, improve access for women, and reduce health system bottlenecks. In addition, some common elements such as political will and government investment have facilitated action in these diverse settings. There are several challenges for continued scale-up in these countries, including maintaining trained personnel, overcoming limited follow-up and treatment capacity, and implementing quality assurance measures. Countries considering scale-up should assess their readiness and conduct careful planning, taking into consideration potential obstacles. International organizations can catalyze action by helping governments overcome initial barriers to scale-up. (c) 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.
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  2. 2
    077765

    FDA gives final approval to Depo amid concerns over safety, cost and coercion.

    WASHINGTON MEMO. 1992 Nov 12; (17):2-3.

    In October 1992, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Depo-Provera for contraceptive use thus increasing the number of available contraceptives to women. Yet USAID has distributed it through its family planning programs in developing countries for many years. It has been available in the US since 1969 for noncontraceptive purposes such as endometrial cancer treatment. More than >30 million women around the world have used it to prevent conception. Today about 9 million women in 90 countries use it. A reason FDA did not approve Depo-Provera is that some studies revealed a link between it and breast tumors and cervical cancer in animals. More recent research conducted by WHO shows no connection with cervical cancer or ovarian cancer. In fact, it demonstrates Depo-Provera may protect against endometrial cancer. Yet it does indicate an insignificant increased risk of breast cancer in younger women. Some research suggests Depo-Provera may decrease bone density leading to osteoporosis and may increase the risk of having a low birth weight infant if the child is conceived before an injection. Evidence exists that it may lead to longer delays in becoming pregnant than other forms of contraception. Still 70% do conceive within 12 months after the last injection. Each Depo-Provera injection delivers a progestin in a water-based solution over 12 weeks resulting in suppressed ovulation. Its failure rate is <.5%/year, so Depo-Provera is one of the most effective reversible contraceptive available. The most common side effects are menstrual changes and weight gain (5-15 lbs.). Some contraindications include pregnancy, heart or liver disease, and breast cancer. As of November 1992, the FDA had not announced the cost or whether there would be a reduced price for family planning and public health clinics. Women's health and rights advocates plan on monitoring introduction of Depo-Provera to make sure that women have received comprehensive information and were not coerced to use it.
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  3. 3
    074000

    Depo-Provera. Controversial contraceptive wins approval from FDA panel.

    Stone R

    SCIENCE. 1992 Jun 26; 256:1754.

    Depo-Provera (DP) was unanimously recommended for approval as a contraceptive by a Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advisory committee. This had happened once before in the mid-1970s, but Congress raised concerns about DP's possible link to cervical cancer. DP has been in use for 20 years as a treatment for uterine cancer. DP is an injectable progesterone analog that induces infertility for 3 months in 99% of the women who use it. It is already in use in 90 countries and has annual sales of US$100 million. The 4 annual shots cost US$120 and is an economical alternative to Norplant. There are still many unanswered questions about its safety. A recent WHO study found that it increased breast cancer by 21%, which was almost statistically significant. However, in the <34 age group breast cancer was twice as common, which is statistically significant. DP was found to increase the number of breast cancer cases by 5.6/100,00; but, it reduced the number of uterine cancer cases by 19.2/100,000. A New Zealand Hospital study found that DP use reduced bone density by 7.5% in the lumber spine and 6.5% in the neck of the femur. Critics charge that Upjohn has had 20 years to compile data but has failed to do so. There is little or no data about its effect on developing fetuses, osteoporosis, or the mechanism that causes breast cancer. All these areas were recommended for follow-up study by the FDA advisory committee.
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