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Your search found 7 Results

  1. 1
    188244

    Bush's other war: the assault on women's sexual and reproductive health and rights.

    International Women's Health Coalition [IWHC]

    New York, New York, IWHC, 2003. 11 p.

    Internationally and domestically, in our courts and in our schools, at the UN and on Capitol Hill, it is no exaggeration to say that the White House is conducting a stealth war against women. This war has devastating consequences for social and economic development, democracy, and human rights—and its effects will be felt by women and girls worldwide. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    188246

    The 108th Congress: more bad news for women.

    International Women's Health Coalition [IWHC]

    New York, New York, IWHC, [2003]. 10 p.

    The United States Congress is pursuing a number of misguided domestic and international policies that have profound—and profoundly counterproductive–impacts on women in the United States and around the world. Each individual action deserves attention; taken together they paint a chilling picture of Congress' willingness to sacrifice women and girls to gain political favor with those on the far right. In tandem with the Bush administration, the Republican-dominated 108th Congress is chipping away at women’s rights and health both at home and abroad. The International Women’s Health Coalition has compiled some of its most egregious actions, as a complement to our ongoing monitoring of the Bush administration (see the Bush’s Other War factsheet at http://www.bushsotherwar.com). (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    187997

    Global eye -- body blow.

    Floyd C

    Metropolis. 2003 Oct 3; [3] p..

    The defining issue of modernity is control of women's fertility. It is this question -- more than religion, politics, economics or the "clash of civilizations" -- that forms the deepest dividing line in the world today. It is a line that cuts through every nation, every people, from the highest level of organized society down to, in many cases, the divided minds and emotions of individual men and women. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    273192

    Final reports, 98th and 99th meetings of the Executive Committee of the Pan American Health Organization, Washington, D.C., 27 September 1986 and 22-26 June 1987. XXXII meeting of the Directing Council of PAHO, XXXIX meeting, WHO Regional Committee for the Americas, Washington, D.C., 21-25 September 1987.

    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]. Pan American Sanitary Bureau, Regional Office of the World Health Organization

    Washington, D.C., 1987. 136 p. (Official Document No. 219)

    The 98th and 99th Meetings of the Executive Committee of the Pan American Health Organization, the XXXII Meeting of the Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization, and the XXXIX Meeting of the World Health Organization (WHO) Committee for the Americas were all held in Washington, D.C., between 9/86 and 9/87. This document contains the final reports of these conferences, including lists of all participants, and complete texts of all resolutions. The 99th Meeting resulted in Resolution VI, urging member countries to implement plans to control Aedes albopictus implicated in dengue, yellow fever, and california encephalitis. Resolution VII on Women, Health and Development, urging member nations to improve public and private comprehensive health care for women, and calling for increased participation of women in professional posts and representative roles within the organization; Resolution VIII, on Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Relief Coordination; and Resolution XII on AIDS Prevention and Control, which called for a WHO Special Program on AIDS and urged member countries to increase efforts at prevention and control, to provide information to WHO, and to permit free international travel for infected people. The XXXII Meeting contained Resolution IX on Women, Health and Development; Resolution X on Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Relief Coordination; Resolution XI on the Coordination of Social Security and Public Health Institutions; and Resolution XII on Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in the Americas.
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  5. 5
    170491

    HIV / AIDS in the Caribbean: issues and options.

    Marquez PV; Sierra VH; Gayle J; Crown R; Griffin C

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2001. xvii, 75 p. (World Bank Country Study)

    This report provides an overview of the challenges and opportunities in addressing the problem of HIV/AIDS in the Caribbean. It presents a snapshot of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the region, offers examples of ways in which Caribbean countries and regional bodies such as the Caribbean Community have responded to the epidemic, discusses alternative actions for addressing the crisis, highlights a range of strategies for donor coordination and cooperation in the region, and identifies the potential role of the World Bank in addressing the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the Caribbean.
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  6. 6
    134847

    Accomplishments in HIV / AIDS programs: highlights from the USAID HIV / AIDS Program, 1995-1997.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]

    Arlington, Virginia, Center for International Health Information, 1997 Dec. 16 p.

    This booklet presents highlights of 1995-97 activities of the US Agency for International Development's (USAID's) HIV/AIDS program. After a brief description of the current status of the pandemic, USAID's response, and its new strategy, the booklet provides a more in-depth examination of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, the highlights of USAID HIV/AIDS prevention activities during the past decade, and USAID's focus on prevention, which focuses on promoting safer sex behavior, increasing condom availability and use, and controlling sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The next section of the booklet reviews USAID's proven interventions, such as behavior change communication and research, condom social marketing, and the development of services to prevent and treat STDs. An example is then given of how the three interventions were used successfully to stem transmission in Thailand. The booklet continues by explaining how USAID has targeted its response to developing countries (where it can have a significant impact on slowing the pandemic), youth, and women, and how peer educators and community outreach activities have been used to spread the prevention message. Next, the booklet discusses how USAID has expanded its partnerships with the World Health Organization's Global Programme on AIDS, with UNAIDS, and with Japan. The final section details the new USAID strategy for the future that will continue to focus on the three aspects of prevention and will also seek to mitigate the impact of HIV/AIDS on individuals and communities. The booklet also contains case studies of various USAID-funded projects.
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  7. 7
    114965

    AIDS research from a gender perspective.

    Pesce L

    In: Gender, health, and sustainable development: a Latin American perspective. Proceedings of a workshop held in Montevideo, Uruguay, 26-29 April 1994, edited by Pandu Wijeyaratne, Janet Hatcher Roberts, Jennifer Kitts, and Lori Jones Arsenault. Ottawa, Canada, International Development Research Centre, 1994 Sep. 19-25.

    A non-profit, nongovernmental organization, the Paulina Luisa Movement was founded in 1985. It is based in the poor Cerro Largo region of Uruguay. There has been considerable concern for many years over the quality of health care which women receive in public and private health clinics. Health services in Uruguay generally perpetuate the notion that men should be the ultimate authority. In the field of medicine, the male doctor, not the female doctor, holds power and knowledge. These men are usually loathe to establish equal and cooperative relationships with their female patients. In this context, four years ago, the coordinators of the movement began to design a new model for women's health care. Many programs were launched designed to improve health services for women. When HIV/AIDS emerged as a serious heath concern, it was immediately incorporated into the women's health program. This paper describes an HIV/AIDS education intervention project proposed by the Paulina Movement and other nongovernmental organizations to the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1992. The project was approved by the WHO and was developed in 1993 throughout Argentina and Uruguay. Project objectives, methodology, the vulnerability of women to HIV/AIDS, and results are presented. The 82 women involved in the project learned new approaches to avoiding infection with HIV.
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