Your search found 62 Results

  1. 1
    393087
    Peer Reviewed

    Integrating systematic screening for gender-based violence into sexual and reproductive health services: results of a baseline study by the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region.

    Guedes A; Bott S; Cuca Y

    International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 2002 Sep; 78 Suppl 1:S57-S63.

    Three Latin American affiliates of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region, Inc. (IPPF/WHR) have begun to integrate gender-based violence screening and services into sexual and reproductive health programs. This paper presents results of a baseline study conducted in the affiliates. Although most staff support integration and many had already begun to address violence in their work, additional sensitization and training, as well as institution-wide changes are needed to provide services effectively and to address needs of women experiencing violence. (c) 2002 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    374600

    Text and context: evaluating peace agreements for their ‘gender perspective’.

    Bell C

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2015 Oct. 32 p.

    Since approximately 1990, peace processes involving the negotiation of formal peace agreements between the protagonists to conflict have become a predominant way of ending violent conflicts, both within and between States. Between 1990 and 2015 1,168 peace agreements have been negotiated in around 102 conflicts, on a wide definition of peace agreements to include agreements at all stages of the negotiations. Peace agreements are therefore important documents with significant capacity to affect women’s lives. However, a range of obstacles for women seeking to influence their design and implementation persists. These include difficulties with accessing talks, achieving equal influence at talks, raising issues of concern for women, and achieving material gains for women as an outcome of the peace process. This report examines what ‘a gender perspective’ in peace agreements might mean, assesses numerous peace agreements from between 1 January 1990 and 1 January 2015 for their ‘gender perspective, and produces data on when women have been specifically mentioned in those peace agreements.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    374582

    Demographic perspectives on female genital mutilation.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2015. 56 p.

    This report, the first such published by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), looks at FGM through the lens of population dynamics and the demographic dividend, based on current evidence and data. It offers quantitative information that both supports evidence-based programming, and frames financial implications for Member States and international donors. Evidence to define the size of the target population and orient actions around areas of greatest impact is of high value in developing interventions and formulating policies. UNFPA remains strongly committed to engaging with Member States, civil society, UN agencies and all other stakeholders to accelerate the elimination of FGM worldwide. Protecting girls upholds their sexual and reproductive health and rights, and enables them to realize their full potential.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    374577

    Minimum standards for prevention and response to gender-based violence in emergencies.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2015 Nov. 101 p.

    Gender based violence is a life-threatening, global health and human rights issue that violates international human rights law and principles of gender equality. In emergencies, such as conflict or natural disasters, the risk of violence, exploitation and abuse is heightened, particularly for women and girls. UNFPA’s “Minimum Standards for Prevention and Response to GBV in Emergencies (GBViE)” promote the safety and well being of women and girls in emergencies and provide practical guidance on how to mitigate and prevent gender-based violence in emergencies and facilitate access to multi-sector services for survivors.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    374572

    Reporting on gender-based violence in the Syria crisis: facilitator’s guide.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2016 Apr. 78 p.

    This training manual enables a journalist or other trainer to conduct a two- or three-day training workshop. The first part of the curriculum begins with training and group discussion about basic concepts and principles that will help participants develop a clear understanding of the meaning of the term ‘gender-based violence’. The programme continues with detailed information about the consequences of gender-based violence and the survivor support services needed. The trainer will also cover the causes and contributing factors, shining a light on prevention and how best to develop effective prevention strategies. The second part of the curriculum focuses on the ethical principles of reporting on gender-based violence, including what to do and what to avoid. It also includes tips for the journalists to consider during interviews and when to report on gender-based violence related issues.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    375713

    Ethical and safety recommendations for intervention research on violence against women. Building on lessons from the WHO publication, "Putting women first: ethical and safety recommendations for research on domestic violence against women".

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. 43 p.

    As the evidence base on the magnitude, context and consequences of violence against women (VAW) has grown, research efforts and attention have begun to focus on decreasing the knowledge gap on effective responses through intervention research. Demonstrating this focus, in November 2012 the WHO Department of Reproductive Health and Research convened a group of experts to discuss health sector-based research to respond to violence against women. This global network of researchers, scientists and practitioners was brought together to enhance existing research efforts and to advocate for greater funding for research on interventions to address VAW and policies and programmes related to it. With the increased interest in and attention of the global community of researchers, practitioners and policy-makers regarding rigorous intervention research for preventing and responding to VAW, a discussion of the ethical considerations specific to this type of research is warranted. These recommendations have been developed to help answer questions specific to conducting research on health-based interventions to prevent and respond to VAW. Research on strategies that use health or health care as an entry point (regardless of the implementation setting, such as a clinic or community) is the focus. However, the discussion may be relevant to research on other kinds of VAW interventions.
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    374451

    10 essential facts about reproductive health in humanitarian emergencies.

    Population Action International [PAI]

    Washington, D.C., PAI, 2015 Aug. 2 p.

    There are more people displaced in the world today than at any other point in history, and more than 75 percent of those needing humanitarian assistance are women and children. In humanitarian emergencies, many women want to avoid pregnancy; however they lack access to the services and supplies that would allow them to delay pregnancy. To meet the reproductive health needs of people in humanitarian emergencies, organizations and policymakers should know the answers to these 10 critical questions.
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    374445

    Male engagement in the HIV response — a platform for action.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2016. 12 p.

    Gender inequalities and harmful gender norms are important drivers of the HIV epidemic, and they are major hindrances to an effective HIV response. While access to HIV services for women and girls remain a concern, a growing body of evidence also shows that men and adolescent boys have limited access to HIV services. Current effort to advance both gender equality and sexual and reproductive health and rights as key elements of the HIV response do not adequately reflect the ways that harmful gender norms and practices negatively affect men, women and adolescent body and girls in all their diversity. This in turn increases HIV-related vulnerability and risk among all of these groups.
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    374441

    Sexual and reproductive health and rights – the key to gender equality and women’s empowerment.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015 Feb. 48 p.

    This report examines the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and gender equality. It explores the different pathways of empowerment that girls and women experience, and analyzes how these pathways are affected by sexual and reproductive health and rights. Policy focus and attention given to gender equality and women’s empowerment has been growing over the last decade, and there are some areas where links are established more conclusively. Although there is strong documentation on the health benefits of investment in sexual and reproductive health, until recently the non medical benefits, such as higher levels of social and political participation, have been largely ignored, partly because they are difficult to measure. While the social and economic implications of sexual and reproductive health and rights are often overlooked, they are no less real. More attention is needed to explore the links between sexual and reproductive health and rights and other critical areas relating to gender equality, such as the representation of women in political and public life.
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    374327

    10 essentials for services provision to survivors of violence against women.

    United Nations. UN Women

    2016 Nov; New York, New York, UN Women, 2016 Nov. 2 p.

    Violence against women and girls is one of the most universal and pervasive human rights violations in the world, of pandemic proportions, with country data showing that about one third of women in the world report experiencing physical or sexual violence at some point in their lifetime, mainly by their partners. UN Women provides knowledge-based policy and programming guidance to a diverse array of stakeholders at international, regional and country levels often partnering with other UN agencies and stakeholders. UN Women’s work is broadly focused on a comprehensive approach to ending violence against women and girls that addresses legislation and policies, prevention, services for survivors, research and data. The briefs included in this package aim to summarize in a concise and friendly way, for advocates, programmers and policy makers, the essential strategies for addressing violence against women in general, for preventing violence and providing services to survivors in particular.
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    374326

    10 essentials for prevention of violence against women.

    United Nations. UN Women

    2016 Nov; New York, New York, UN Women, 2016 Nov. 2 p.

    Violence against women and girls is one of the most universal and pervasive human rights violations in the world, of pandemic proportions, with country data showing that about one third of women in the world report experiencing physical or sexual violence at some point in their lifetime, mainly by their partners. UN Women provides knowledge-based policy and programming guidance to a diverse array of stakeholders at international, regional and country levels often partnering with other UN agencies and stakeholders. UN Women’s work is broadly focused on a comprehensive approach to ending violence against women and girls that addresses legislation and policies, prevention, services for survivors, research and data. The briefs included in this package aim to summarize in a concise and friendly way, for advocates, programmers and policy makers, the essential strategies for addressing violence against women in general, for preventing violence and providing services to survivors in particular.
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    374325

    10 essentials for addressing violence against women.

    United Nations. UN Women

    2016 Nov; New York, New York, UN Women, 2016 Nov. 2 p.

    Violence against women and girls is one of the most universal and pervasive human rights violations in the world, of pandemic proportions, with country data showing that about one third of women in the world report experiencing physical or sexual violence at some point in their lifetime, mainly by their partners. UN Women provides knowledge-based policy and programming guidance to a diverse array of stakeholders at international, regional and country levels often partnering with other UN agencies and stakeholders. UN Women’s work is broadly focused on a comprehensive approach to ending violence against women and girls that addresses legislation and policies, prevention, services for survivors, research and data. The briefs included in this package aim to summarize in a concise and friendly way, for advocates, programmers and policy makers, the essential strategies for addressing violence against women in general, for preventing violence and providing services to survivors in particular.
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    374322

    Female genital mutilation/cutting and violence against women and girls strengthening the policy linkages between different forms of violence.

    United Nations. UN Women; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; UNICEF

    2017 Feb; New York, New York, UN Women, 2017 Feb. 20 p.

    Violence against women and girls (VAWG) manifests in different forms. These include intimate partner violence, non-partner sexual violence, sexual exploitation and trafficking, and harmful practices such as female genital mutilation/cutting (FGM/C) and child, early and forced marriage, among others. Programmes to end harmful practices and programmes to end intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence are often planned and implemented separately, despite all being rooted in gender inequality and gender-based discrimination against women and girls. While this is intended so that programmes can be tailored accordingly, it can result in isolation of initiatives that would otherwise benefit from sharing of knowledge and good practices and from strategic, coordinated efforts. This policy note explores policy and programming interlinkages and considers entry points in the areas of (i) national legislation, (ii) prevention strategies, (iii) response for survivors, and (iv) data and evidence, for increased coordination and collaboration to advance the objectives of ending FGM/C and other forms of VAWG, in particular intimate partner violence and non-partner sexual violence. The note builds on the background paper “Finding convergence in policy frameworks: A background paper on the policy links between gender, violence against women and girls, and female genital mutilation/cutting” (available below). This policy note is intended for multiple audiences, including those directly involved in policy development, planning and implementing initiatives, those providing technical support, and advocates for ending all forms of VAWG, including FGM/C. This work is the result of a collaboration of UN Women with the UNFPA–UNICEF Joint Programme on FGM/C.
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    375500

    Consolidated guideline on sexual and reproductive health and rights of women living with HIV.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 144 p.

    HIV is not only driven by gender inequality, but it also entrenches gender inequality, leaving women more vulnerable to its impact. Providing sexual and reproductive health interventions for women living with HIV that are grounded in principles of gender equality and human rights can have a positive impact on their quality of life; it is also a step towards long-term improved health status and equity.
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    376218
    Peer Reviewed

    Sexual health in the International Classification of Diseases (ICD): implications for measurement and beyond.

    Chou D; Cottler S; Khosla R; Reed GM; Say L

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2015 Nov; 23(46):185-92.

    This paper examines different dimensions of sexual health as related to the measurement of sexual health indicators and the proposed changes in the International Classification of Diseases to address issues related to sexuality and sexual health with an aim of informing health policy-making and programming. The lack of mechanisms for monitoring and evaluating sexual health outcomes has impeded the development of policies and programmes that support sexual health. The potential impact of changes to the ICD-11 is major and far-reaching given that the ICD is used by countries to define eligibility and access to health services and to formulate relevant policies and laws, and is used by health professionals as a basis for conceptualizing health conditions, treatments and outcomes. Improving the measurement of sexual health-related indicators builds the evidence base on scientific knowledge of sex, sexuality, sexual health and rights. As we stand on the cusp of the post-2015 era and the development agenda transitions to the Sustainable Development Goals, a unique opportunity presents itself to further consider how sexual health is defined, conceptualized, and monitored.
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    372502

    Engaging men and boys in refugee settings to address sexual and gender based violence.

    Aasheim C; Buscher D; Peacock D; Ngugi L

    Johannesburg, South Africa, Sonke Gender Justice Network, [2008]. 26 p.

    UNHCR has recognized the essential role that both male staff and male persons of concern play in ending gender-based violence in its operations and that protecting women from SGBV is part of the organization’s core protection mandate. This workshop was organized to raise awareness of the need to engage men and boys, to look at successful models for such engagement, and to develop country-level strategies for strengthening the engagement of men and boys to end sexual and gender-based violence. The workshop addressed knowledge, attitudes and action and brought together UNHCR and implementing partner staff as well as refugees from ten African countries including gender practitioners and organizations already engaged in working with men and boys. A four day regional workshop was facilitated by Sonke Gender Justice Network (Sonke) and the Women’s Commission for Refugee Women and Children. (Women’s Commission), in cooperation with UNHCR, to increase and encourage the involvement of men and boys in the work against sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). The participants consisted of multifunctional teams from nine different countries in the Great Lakes region, Eastern Africa and Southern Africa (Uganda, Burundi, Kenya, Tanzania, Zambia, Namibia, Zimbabwe, South Africa and Rwanda), a professor from St Cloud’s University and the founder of MAGE in Sierra Leone. The workshop had three main objectives; a) Awareness raising for UNHCR staff, people of concern and NGO partners on addressing masculinities. b) Skills building for UNHCR staff, people of concern and NGO partners on how to integrate masculinities into programs to address SGBV and promote gender equality. c) Development of a critical mass of trainers to undertake training on masculinities throughout the region. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    337482

    Women and girls safe spaces. A guidance note based on lessons learned from the Syrian crisis

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    [New York, New York], UNFPA, 2015. [32] p.

    The creation of women and girls safe spaces has emerged as a key strategy for the protection and empowerment of women and girls affected by the Syrian crisis. This document provides an overview of what safe spaces are, and what key principles should be followed when establishing such spaces in humanitarian and post-crisis contexts. This guidance is based on the experiences of UNFPA and its partners in Jordan, Lebanon, Iraq, Syria and Turkey. It also refers to experiences documented by the Gender-Based Violence coordination mechanisms in Jordan and Lebanon. Lessons learned from other regions are also referenced. Guidance has also been taken from the child protection and adolescent girls sectors in establishing child-friendly spaces and girls’ safe spaces.
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    335016

    A transformative stand-alone goal on achieving gender equality, women's rights and women's empowerment: Imperatives and key components. In the context of the post-2015 development framework and sustainable development goals.

    United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women [UN Women]

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2013 Jun. [48] p.

    UN Women has launched a new paper to contribute to the ongoing debate on the post-2015 development agenda. In the paper, UN Women lays out its vision for a transformative framework that addresses the structural impediments to gender equality and the achievement of women’s rights.
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    334924

    Progress for children: A report card on adolescents. No. 10.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2012 Apr. [56] p.

    Adolescents experience intense physical, psychological, emotional and economic changes as they make the transition from childhood to adulthood. This edition of Progress for Children sets out who adolescents are, where they live, what they do, what their problems are and how their needs are -- or are not -- being met. Understanding adolescents in all their diversity is fundamental to improving their lives.
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    334921

    Monitoring of population programmes, focusing on adolescents and youth. Report of the Secretary-General.

    United Nations. Secretary-General

    [New York, New York], United Nations, Economic and Social Council, 2012 Feb 8. [20] p. (E/CN.9/2012/5)

    In accordance with decision 2010/101, by which the Commission on Population and Development adopted “Adolescents and youth” as the theme for its forty-fifth session, the present report provides an overview of development issues related to young people’s sexual and reproductive health, with particular emphasis on the needs of girls and young women. The report reviews actions by Governments, non-governmental organizations and the United Nations Population Fund and its partners that create a supportive environment for young people as they make the transition to adulthood; invest in young people; promote their rights and gender equality; provide access to sexual and reproductive health information and services; encourage their education and social integration; ensure protective measures and safe spaces for the most vulnerable among them, including those in humanitarian situations; and support an enabling policy and legal framework for their participation in policymaking. The report concludes by drawing attention to further actions required to promote and secure young people’s sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as a development priority to meet internationally agreed development goals and contribute to countries’ broad development aims.
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    334255

    The United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. Strategy 2010-2015. Vision 2015.

    United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women

    [New York, New York], United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women, [2011]. [32] p.

    The strategy of the United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women identifies the key roles the UN Trust Fund can play in the coming years, including driving country- and local-level implementation of existing policies and laws, serving as a global hub of knowledge on “what works,” and catalysing strong and coherent UN system-wide action to support countries in addressing the violence against women pandemic. The strategy, titled “Vision 2015,” centres on: Translating the promise to end violence against women and girls into practice: Intensifying efforts to turn policy pledges into reality for women and girls by expanding the quality and quantity of support available for effective prevention and support programmes on the ground. Paving the way to knowledge-based action on ending violence against women and girls: Generating and disseminating knowledge on “what works” in the field of ending violence against women, and serving as a hub of knowledge on best practices for adaptation and expansion. Building ownership of the UN Trust Fund throughout the UN system: Strengthening the role and contributions of the UN system at the global, regional and country levels, building on the United Nations’ commitment to “deliver as one” to advance implementation of national strategies to end violence against women and girls. Grounded in the UN Secretary-General’s “UNITE to end Violence against Women campaign, the strategy capitalizes on the UN Trust Fund’s unique potential to directly advance the campaign’s goals on the ground.
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    334254

    United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. Together for a better tomorrow.

    Lewis K

    [New York, New York], UN Women, [2011]. [21] p.

    Today, violence against women is a fact of life in communities and countries across the world. It transcends the bounds of geography, race, culture, class and religion. It ranges from intimate partner violence to the use of rape as a weapon of war, from sexual harassment in public spaces to harmful practices like child marriage. But tomorrow can be different. Societies change, sometimes very fast. Behaviours, norms and institutions that are commonplace and unremarkable in the eyes of one generation can be rejected by the next. The UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women, established in 1996, embodies the heartening awakening of global consciousness. The only multilateral grant-making mechanism exclusively devoted to supporting efforts to end violence against women and girls, the UN Trust Fund works with partners across the world to secure much-needed services for women and girls affected by violence and to invest in long-term solutions to prevent violence from happening in the first place. For fifteen years, the UN Trust Fund has supported innovative, effective initiatives designed to transform the ways in which people think and act. The brochure “Together for a Better Tomorrow” highlights the work of the UN Trust Fund and its partners, delivering on the international community’s commitment to making good on its promises to end violence against women and girls.
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    334252

    Handbook for national action plans on violence against women.

    United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women [UN Women]

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2012. [80] p.

    The Handbook for National Action Plans on Violence against Women brings together current knowledge on effective policy for the prevention of, and response to, violence against women, and concretely demonstrates how States have developed and implemented such policy in their own contexts. Although not a model plan itself , this publication sets out guidelines to help policy makers and advocates formulate effective plans. It is based on good practices in States’ plans and the advice of experts from different countries and regions. It first outlines the international and regional legal and policy framework which mandates States to adopt and implement National Action Plans to address violence against women. It then presents a model framework for National Action Plans on violence against women, which sets out recommendations, accompanied by explanatory commentaries and good practice examples.
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    334251

    Report on the online discussion on eliminating violence against women and girls -- gaps, challenges and strategic directions in prevention and multisectoral services and responses.

    Baker J

    [New York, New York], UN Women, [2012]. [32] p. (CSW 57 Online Discussion)

    Between 23 July and 7 August 2012, UN Women ran a dynamic online discussion to support preparations for the forthcoming 57th Commission on the Status of Women which brought together the views of diverse respondents on the good practices and key gaps and challenges in the prevention of and response to violence against women and girls. Participants included representatives from civil society, government organizations, research and leadership institutions and UN agencies in many countries from all regions of the world. The discussions will be taken into consideration in the development of the Secretary-General’s Reports to the Commission on the Status of Women.
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    351822
    Peer Reviewed

    Violence against women: an urgent public health priority.

    Garcia-Moreno C; Watts C

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2011 Jan 1; 89(1):2.

    This editorial focuses on violence against women and states that addressing it is central to the achievement of Millennium Development Goal (MDG) 3 on women's empowerment and gender equality as well as MDG 4, 5, and 6. It discusses different aspects related to violence against women including: research efforts, mortality and morbidity rates, economic costs, social costs, and prevention.
    Add to my documents.

Pages