Your search found 183 Results

  1. 1
    374594

    A child is a child: protecting children on the move from violence, abuse and exploitation.

    Beise J; Grojec A; Hansen CB; Matthes J; Rosengaertner S; You D

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2017 May. 64 p.

    Among the millions of children on the move worldwide, many – including hundreds of thousands of unaccompanied children and adolescents – undertake dangerous journeys. This report shows how the lack of safe and legal pathways for refugee and migrant children feeds a booming market for human smuggling and puts them at risk of violence, abuse and exploitation. Building on recent UNICEF policy proposals, it sets out ways that governments can better protect these vulnerable children.
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  2. 2
    374592

    Lives on hold: making sure no child is left behind in Myanmar.

    UNICEF

    [New York, New York], UNICEF, 2017 May. 20 p.

    As part of a series highlighting the challenges faced by children in current crisis situations, this UNICEF Child Alert examines the impact of the reforms, economic growth and national reconciliation process in Myanmar. It also looks at the investments in children’s health, education and protection that Myanmar is making, and shows how children in remote, conflict-affected parts of the country have yet to benefit from them.
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  3. 3
    374571

    Implementing comprehensive HIV and STI programmes with transgender people: practical guidance for collaborative interventions.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]; IRGT: A Global Network of Transgender Women and HIV; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; University of California, San Francisco. Center of Excellence for Transgender Health; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; United States Agency for International Development [USAID]

    New York, New York, UNDP, 2016 Apr. 212 p.

    This publication provides guidance to programme designers, implementers, policymakers and decision-makers on how to meaningfully engage adolescents in the AIDS response and in broader health programming. It also demonstrates why adolescents and youth are critical in efforts to end the AIDS epidemic by 2030. The publication additionally highlights what steps should be taken to implement programmes and policies that improve adolescent health outcomes (including for HIV) at the national, regional and global levels.
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  4. 4
    333590

    The state of the world's children 2012. Children in an urban world.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2012. [156] p.

    When many of us think of the world’s poorest children, the image that comes readily to mind is that of a child going hungry in a remote rural community in sub-Saharan Africa -- as so many are today. But as The State of the World’s Children 2012 shows with clarity and urgency, millions of children in cities and towns all over the world are also at risk of being left behind. In fact, hundreds of millions of children today live in urban slums, many without access to basic services. They are vulnerable to dangers ranging from violence and exploitation to the injuries, illnesses and death that result from living in crowded settlements atop hazardous rubbish dumps or alongside railroad tracks. And their situations -- and needs -- are often represented by aggregate figures that show urban children to be better off than their rural counterparts, obscuring the disparities that exist among the children of the cities. This report adds to the growing body of evidence and analysis, from UNICEF and our partners, that scarcity and dispossession afflict the poorest and most marginalized children and families disproportionately. What does this mean for children? This document examines the situation of children growing up in urban settings and finds that denial of children’s rights to survival, health, nutrition, education and protection are widespread. It sheds light on the scale of these urban inequities and suggests ways to ensure that urban childhoods are safe, healthy, participatory and fulfilling. The report also includes sections on adolescents, HIV and other issues impacting the well-being of youth. (Excerpt)
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  5. 5
    347661

    Education, youth and development: UNESCO in Latin America and the Caribbean. Educación, juventud y desarrollo: acciones de la UNESCO en América Latina y el Caribe.

    L'Homme C; Henríquez CJ

    Santiago, Chile, Gráfica Funny, 2010 Aug. [43] p.

    This publication is produced by UNESCO's Regional Bureau of Education for Latin America and the Caribbean (OREALC/UNESCO Santiago). This document analyses the Millennium Development Goals and the Education for All (EFA) goals from the perspective of youth. The publication is the result of a joint effort by UNESCO Offices and Institutes in the region, which provided information on four key issues important to youth in Latin America and the Caribbean: quality education for all youth, education for peaceful coexistence, sexuality education, and HIV prevention and education for sustainable development. Innovative experiences described in the publication include UNESCO's assistance in drafting public policy in Brazil, the implementation of a post-earthquake educational model in Haiti, and teacher training on HIV/AIDS prevention and reduction of the effects of violence in Mexico.
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  6. 6
    332935

    Human resources for health: a gender analysis.

    George A

    [Johannesburg, South Africa], University of the Witwatersrand, Centre for Health Policy, Health Systems Knowledge Network, 2007 Jul. [58] p.

    In this paper I discuss gender issues manifested within health occupations and across them. In particular, I examine gender dynamics in medicine, nursing, community health workers and home carers. I also explore from a gender perspective issues concerning delegation, migration and violence, which cut across these categories of health workers. These occupational categories and themes reflect priorities identified by the terms of reference for this review paper and also the themes that emerged from the accessed literature. This paper is based on a desk review of literature accessed through the internet, search engines, correspondence with other experts and reviewing bibliographies of existing material. These efforts resulted in a list of 534 articles, chapters, books and reports. Although most of the literature reviewed was in English, some of it was also in Spanish and Portuguese. Material related to training and interpersonal patient-provider relations that highlights how occupational inequalities affect the availability and quality of health care is covered by other review papers commissioned by the Women and Gender Equity Knowledge Network. (Excerpt)
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  7. 7
    329553

    HIV interventions for young people in humanitarian emergencies.

    UNAIDS. Inter-Agency Task Team on HIV and Young People

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund, HIV/AIDS Branch, [2008]. 8 p. (Guidance Brief)

    This Brief has been developed by the Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on HIV and Young People1 to assist United Nations Country Teams (UNCT) and UN Theme Groups on HIV/AIDS in providing guidance to their staffs, governments, development partners, civil society and other implementing partners on effective HIV interventions for young people in humanitarian emergencies. It is part of a series of seven global Guidance Briefs that focus on HIV prevention, treatment, care and support interventions for young people that can be delivered through different settings and for a range of target groups.
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  8. 8
    325644

    Situation of human rights in Afghanistan. Commission on Human Rights resolution 2003/77.

    United Nations. Commission on Human Rights

    [Geneva, Switzerland], United Nations, Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, 2003. 4 p. (E/CN.4/RES/2003/77)

    Guided by the Charter of the United Nations, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the International Covenants on Human Rights and accepted humanitarian rules, as set forth in the Geneva Conventions of 12 August 1949 and the Additional Protocols thereto. Reaffirming that all Member States have an obligation to promote and protect human rights and fundamental freedoms and to fulfil the obligations they have freely undertaken under the various international instruments. Recalling that Afghanistan is a party to several international human rights instruments and has obligations to report on their implementation. Recalling also the relevant resolutions and decisions of the Commission on Human Rights, the relevant resolutions and presidential statements of the Security Council, the reports of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict (S/2002/1299) and on women, peace and security (S/2002/1154) and the most recent resolution adopted by the Commission on the Status of Women. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    324041
    Peer Reviewed

    A world fit for children?

    Lancet. 2007 Dec 15; 370(9604):1975.

    A UNICEF report published on Dec 10 gives the most comprehensive data to date on progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). Although there has been much international attention focused on MDG-4-to reduce under-5 mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015-the report also details child-focused statistical information on all of the eight MDGs, in addition to data on World Fit for Children targets. These targets cover important factors in child health and wellbeing which are not included in the MDGs, such as child labour, violence, and discrimination. The report combines all appropriate and latest available information and relies on data from UNICEF global databases, Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys, and Demographic and Health Surveys, which vary in the time period in which information is collected and collated. Therefore, although some statistics in the report are new, other figures are more familiar. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    323546

    Darfur debated.

    Cohen R

    Forced Migration Review. 2007 Dec; (29):55-57.

    Bruising debates within the human rights and humanitarian communities have centered on the numbers who have died in Darfur, the use of the term genocide, the efficacy of military versus political solutions and the extent to which human rights advocacy can undermine humanitarian programmes on the ground. Essential to effective planning in an emergency is knowing the scope of the disaster, the number of civilians who died, and from what cause. Yet in the Darfur emergency it has proved particularly difficult to affirm with any certainty the number of people who have perished and in what way. The principal obstacle has been the government of Sudan. Itself directly involved in ethnic cleansing, it has prevented compilation of credible mortality statistics. While the loss of life from the Israeli-Hizbollah conflict of 2006 was precisely determined, thus allowing families and communities to mourn, there has been a systematic effort by the regime of Omar Hassan al-Bashir to cover up the death toll in Darfur. The government of Sudan has claimed that only 9,000 have died. The UN, however, says that more than 200,000 have perished whereas Amnesty International estimates 300,000 (95,000 killed and more than 200,000 dead from conflict-related hunger or disease) and the Save Darfur Coalition, an umbrella group of NGOs, places the total at 400,000. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    322951
    Peer Reviewed

    Meeting the health needs of Iraqi refugees in Jordan.

    Devi S

    Lancet. 2007 Dec 1; 370(9602):1815-1816.

    Over 2 million Iraqis have fled from violence in Iraq to neighbouring countries such as Jordan and Syria. But, unable to cope with the influx of refugees and their health and humanitarian needs, these countries are making entry more restrictive. 7-year-old Mohammad sat up in his hospital bed in Amman, Jordan, half his face concealed by thick, white bandages, as his father Salman recounted their tale. In October last year, the family was receiving condolences at a traditional mourning tent outside their Baghdad home for Salman's father, who was killed in sectarian violence because of his past job as an army officer under Saddam Hussein. As the mourners congregated, a car bomb exploded at the nearby market, prompting the panicked family to flee in all directions. Salman's experience as a policeman made him shout out warnings to people nearby but to no avail as a second bomb detonated soon afterwards. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    319270

    Gender, justice, and truth commissions.

    Mantilla J; Anderlini SN

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2006 Jun. [68] p.

    This study reviewed the gender-related aspects of the work of TCs in Peru, Sierra Leone, and South Africa, as expressed in their daily work, in the drafting of the commission's mandate, in the participation of civil society institutions, and in the preparation of the final report. The three country experiences were selected as informative examples. Following a description of the experiences in the three countries, this study focuses on the Peruvian case to illustrate how the formal and informal justice systems have responded to the gender-relevant findings of the TC. The study also provides general suggestions for the consideration of World Bank staff, particularly in the incorporation of gender issues into the Bank's postconflict interventions in relevant sectors. Finally, the study reviews some basic indicators of progress and impact in Bank-financed interventions in postconflict and transitional settings. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    318971

    Third milestones of a Global Campaign for Violence Prevention report 2007. Scaling up.

    Brown D; Butchart A; Harvey A; Bartolomeos K; Meddings D

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2007. 31 p.

    This report, the third of its kind, reviews the progress that has been made in the field of violence prevention since the October 2002 launch of the World report on violence and health and the Global Campaign for Violence Prevention. More importantly, it sets out what the World Health Organization (WHO) and its partners can do over the next 5 years to expand violence prevention programming and to demonstrate, in terms of lives saved lives and suffering averted, the impact of violence prevention. Violence is a major obstacle to health and development, but as Nelson Mandela said in the foreword to the World report on violence and health, "Violence can be prevented. Violent cultures can be turned around ... Governments, communities and individuals can make a difference". As well as increased awareness that violence is preventable, notable achievements of the first 5 years of the Global Campaign for Violence Prevention detailed here include consolidating and disseminating normative guidance on how to prevent violence; carving a niche within government health ministries for focal persons to promote violence prevention; and taking stock of the scale and nature of the violence problem and the responses to it. At the individual level, tens of thousands of people in scores of countries have been touched by violence prevention programmes and thousands of victims have been helped to cope with the aftermath of their experience through services established as part of the Global Campaign for Violence Prevention. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    308514

    Addressing gender-based violence: A critical review of interventions.

    Morrison A; Ellsberg M; Bott S

    Research Observer. 2007 Spring; 22(1):25-51.

    This article highlights the progress in building a knowledge base on effective ways to increase access to justice for women who have experienced gender-based violence, offer quality services to survivors, and reduce levels of gender-based violence. While recognizing the limited number of high-quality studies on program effectiveness, this review of the literature highlights emerging good practices. Much progress has recently been made in measuring gender-based violence, most notably through a World Health Organization multicountry study and Demographic and Health Surveys. Even so, country coverage is still limited, and much of the information from other data sources cannot be meaningfully compared because of differences in how intimate partner violence is measured and reported. The dearth of high-quality evaluations means that policy recommendations in the short run must be based on emerging evidence in developing economies (process evaluations, qualitative evaluations, and imperfectly designed impact evaluations) and on more rigorous impact evaluations from developed countries. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    316492

    International Women's Day call: IFIs must stop contributing to violence against women.

    Gender Action-USA; 50 Years Is Enough: U.S. Network for Global Economic Justice; Africa Action-USA; Association for Women’s Rights in Development [AWID]; BanglaPraxis-Bangladesh

    [New York, New York], Women's UN Report Program and Network, 2007. [4] p.

    The theme of International Women's Day 2007 is Ending Impunity for Violence Against Women. Gender-blind International Financial Institution (IFI) operations-those of the International Monetary Fund (IMF), World Bank and the regional development banks-financing private-corporate led growth, debt repayment, and low inflation and public spending often aggravate existing discrimination against women and girls, particularly among marginalized groups such as indigenous peoples. Such IFI investments intensify poverty, human displacement, trafficking in and violence against women, prostitution, sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. The IFIs may not intend their investments to contribute to violence against women, but the impacts are all too real. For example, the International Finance Corporation (IFC) and European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD)-funded Baku-Tbilisi-Ceyhan Pipeline, supposedly designed to boost development, has degraded theenvironment, driven many women and girls in communities around the pipeline into prostitution, and increased sexually transmitted diseases, sexual harassment and violence against women. The East Asian financial crisis-brought on ten years ago largely by bad IMF advice designed to stimulate foreign investment-strained household gender relations, increasing domestic violence against women and girls, family abandonment by household heads, and female suicide. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    316352

    Show us the money: Is violence against women on the HIV and AIDS funding agenda?

    Fried ST

    Washington, D.C., Action Aid, 2007. 76 p.

    In response to the growing body of evidence on violence and HIV&AIDS, and in response to calls by human rights advocates for effective action on these issues, international institutions and national governments have articulated a concern to address gender-based violence, including within the context of HIV&AIDS. Little is known, however, about what is actually being done to address these issues in policies, programming and funding, and whether the efforts that are underway are truly based on the human rights and health agenda advocated for so long by women's movements throughout the world. In order to better understand the level of resources - in policy, programming and funding -- committed to this deadly intersection, a report was commissioned by an international coalition of organizations working on women's human rights, development, health and HIV& AIDS. This report, "Show Us the Money: is violence against women on the HIV&AIDS donor agenda?" analyses the policies, programming and funding patterns of the four largest public donors to HIV&AIDS: the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the President's Emergency Fund for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR/US), the UK Department for International Development (DFID), and the World Bank, and UNAIDS (the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS). The report is the first step in an effort by this coalition to monitor the policies, programmes, and funding streams of international agencies and national governments, and to hold these agencies accountable to basic health and human rights objectives. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    315422

    Linking women's human rights and the MDGs: an agenda for 2005 from the UK Gender and Development Network.

    Painter GR

    Gender and Development. 2005 Mar; 13(1):79-93.

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are a potentially powerful tool for progress on development and human rights. Women?s human rights activists should recognise and build on the political will mobilised around the MDGs. However, the MDGs reflect problems in the dominant development approach. They seek to use women in their existing social roles to ?deliver? other aims, and do not address the need to eradicate gender inequality, resulting in lack of commitment to address key issues for women, including gender-based violence. There are further problems with the MDGs? indicators, analytical approach, and accountability mechanisms. The MDGs should be reframed as human rights obligations. To this end, links should be fostered between the 2005 reviews of implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action and progress on the Millennium Declaration and the MDGs. (author's)
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  18. 18
    314978

    Children and armed conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

    Freedson J; Singh S

    UN Chronicle. 2006; [4] p..

    In June 2004, six fighters from the Congolese Rally for Democracy-Goma gang-raped a woman in the presence of her husband and children, while another soldier raped her three-year-old daughter, according to Human Rights Watch. In June 2005, a 17-year-old boy was arrested by a Mai-Mai officer after he refused to draw water for the military stationed there and was severely tortured while he was held in detention in the camp. A local non-governmental organization (NGO) reported that the boy was released only after a large fine was paid. In November 2005, three soldiers from the United Congolese forces tied an 11-year-old girl with an electric cable and repeatedly raped her in a military camp, according to the United Nations Organization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUC). These cases are examples of the brutal violations against Congolese children, as documented by the Watchlist on Children and Armed Conflict in its April 2006 report, Struggling to Survive: Children in Armed Conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The country continues to endure the world's deadliest humanitarian crisis and, according to the International Rescue Committee, more than 38,000 people die every month as a direct and indirect consequence of the armed conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). As many as 45 per cent of these deaths occurred among children who fell victim to intolerable human rights violations committed in an atmosphere of almost complete impunity. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    314640

    Collection of international instruments and other legal texts concerning refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. 3. Regional instruments: Africa, Middle East, Asia, Americas. Provisional release.

    United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNHCR, 2006 Nov. [385] p.

    The first edition of the Collection of International Instruments Concerning Refugees was published in 1979. Thereafter, the compilation was updated regularly as new developments took place in the international law relating to refugees and other persons of concern to UNHCR. The 2006 edition takes account of the increasingly apparent inter-relationship and complimentarity between, on one hand, international refugee law and, on the other, human rights, humanitarian, criminal and other bodies of law. The Collection features over 240 instruments and legal texts drawn from across this broad spectrum. Compared to the earlier edition of the Collection, this edition includes many international instruments and legal texts relating to issues such as statelessness, the internally displaced and the asylum-migration debate (such as trafficking, smuggling, maritime and aviation law and migrants) as well as matters such as torture, discrimination, detention and the protection of women and children. The range of relevant regional instruments and legal texts have also been enhanced, not least to ensure that they are used more effectively while advocating for refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. Today, users can access veritable reference resources by electronic means. The Collection itself is accessible on-line. For users not able to access electronic facilities, it provides, in hard copy, the most important instruments in a manner easy to use in daily work. Indeed, even for those otherwise able to take advantage of electronic facilities, the availability of these instruments systematically in a single source offers unique facility and benefits. (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    314639

    Collection of international instruments and other legal texts concerning refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. 1. International instruments: UNHCR, refugees and asylum, statelessness, internally displaced persons, migrants, human rights. Provisional release.

    United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNHCR, 2006 Nov. [585] p.

    The first edition of the Collection of International Instruments Concerning Refugees was published in 1979. Thereafter, the compilation was updated regularly as new developments took place in the international law relating to refugees and other persons of concern to UNHCR. The 2006 edition takes account of the increasingly apparent inter-relationship and complimentarity between, on one hand, international refugee law and, on the other, human rights, humanitarian, criminal and other bodies of law. The Collection features over 240 instruments and legal texts drawn from across this broad spectrum. Compared to the earlier edition of the Collection, this edition includes many international instruments and legal texts relating to issues such as statelessness, the internally displaced and the asylum-migration debate (such as trafficking, smuggling, maritime and aviation law and migrants) as well as matters such as torture, discrimination, detention and the protection of women and children. The range of relevant regional instruments and legal texts have also been enhanced, not least to ensure that they are used more effectively while advocating for refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. Today, users can access veritable reference resources by electronic means. The Collection itself is accessible on-line. For users not able to access electronic facilities, it provides, in hard copy, the most important instruments in a manner easy to use in daily work. Indeed, even for those otherwise able to take advantage of electronic facilities, the availability of these instruments systematically in a single source offers unique facility and benefits. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    314638

    Collection of international instruments and other legal texts concerning refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. 2. International instruments: international humanitarian law, international criminal law, international maritime and aviation law, miscellaneous. Provisional release.

    United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNHCR, 2006 Nov. [415] p.

    The first edition of the Collection of International Instruments Concerning Refugees was published in 1979. Thereafter, the compilation was updated regularly as new developments took place in the international law relating to refugees and other persons of concern to UNHCR. The 2006 edition takes account of the increasingly apparent inter-relationship and complimentarity between, on one hand, international refugee law and, on the other, human rights, humanitarian, criminal and other bodies of law. The Collection features over 240 instruments and legal texts drawn from across this broad spectrum. Compared to the earlier edition of the Collection, this edition includes many international instruments and legal texts relating to issues such as statelessness, the internally displaced and the asylum-migration debate (such as trafficking, smuggling, maritime and aviation law and migrants) as well as matters such as torture, discrimination, detention and the protection of women and children. The range of relevant regional instruments and legal texts have also been enhanced, not least to ensure that they are used more effectively while advocating for refugees and others of concern to UNHCR. Today, users can access veritable reference resources by electronic means. The Collection itself is accessible on-line. For users not able to access electronic facilities, it provides, in hard copy, the most important instruments in a manner easy to use in daily work. Indeed, even for those otherwise able to take advantage of electronic facilities, the availability of these instruments systematically in a single source offers unique facility and benefits. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    314604

    Combating gender-based violence: a key to achieving the MDGs.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM]; United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Affairs. Office of the Special Adviser on Gender Issues and Advancement of Women [OSAGI]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2005 Mar. 30 p.

    The Millennium Project Report identifies the mounting of vigorous campaigns to combat violence against women as a possible "quick win" action that should be taken to accelerate achievement of the MDGs. The goal is to mobilize leadership at the national, regional and global levels to make violence unacceptable. The Network of African Women Ministers and Parliamentarians has made a commitment to combating gender-based violence (GBV) by taking the lead in developing innovative interventions including: drafting and lobbying for appropriate legislation; raising awareness through advocacy; building partnership by enhancing national, regional and international networks; and raising community awareness about gender-based violence. This kit is a contribution to the realization of the Network's goal. It is a tool whose aim is to outline the problem of gender-based violence, elaborate its linkages to poverty, reproductive health, HIV/AIDS and conflict, and discuss its impact on a nation's development. The kit refers to international commitments made by governments combined with other regional and international instruments, which they can use to mount national campaigns to halt gender-based violence in all its forms. It is designed to serve as a basis for advocacy work, and as a tool to assist policy and decision makers to contribute to the achievement of the MDGs. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    313192

    Addressing sexual violence in post-conflict Burundi.

    Zicherman N

    Forced Migration Review. 2007 Jan; (27):48-49.

    Conflict and massive population movements in Burundi have resulted in dramatic increases in rape and other forms of sexual violence. Alarm about the high incidence of sexual violence against Burundian women was first sounded during the 1993-2003 civil war when large numbers of rebels and Burundian armed forces occupied villages and towns. Peace accords were finally signed in 2003, and general elections held in 2005, but Burundian women and girls continue to suffer high levels of sexual violence. In postconflict Burundi, the influx of returning refugees and displaced persons, the presence of large numbers of demobilised excombatants, the high prevalence of female-headed households, widespread lack of economic opportunity and general breakdown in social norms all contribute to increased levels of sexual violence. (excerpt)
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  24. 24
    313185

    Fighting gender-based violence in South Sudan.

    Elia L

    Forced Migration Review. 2007 Jan; (27):39.

    Decades of under-development and conflict have left South Sudanese women - in the words of the late John Garang - "the poorest of the poor and the marginalised of the marginalised." It is in this context that violence against women and girls breeds. Almost all southern Sudan's key development indicators are the lowest in the world. Severe gender disparity is manifest in access to education and health and differential life expectancy. Only 5% of births are attended by skilled health staff and maternal mortality is high. In contrast to common demographic patterns around the world, and in spite of the impact of war on the male population, there are more elderly men than women. Few reputable gender-based violence (GBV) studies have been carried out in southern Sudan. Studies may have been limited in terms of sample size and statistical analysis but, nevertheless, have produced evidence of extensive domestic violence, early/forced marriages, wife inheritance, property ownership, child custody, arbitrary incarceration, female genital mutilation and sexual harassment and assault. Prolonged conflict has exacerbated and created new security risks, especially for women and children. These include disruption of community and family structures, breakdown in conflict resolution mechanisms, presence of arms and vigilantes, prevalent trauma, increased alcohol consumption, weak security institutions, poor law and order and tensions between those who have been displaced and those who have stayed put. (excerpt)
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  25. 25
    313187

    Listening to the women of Darfur.

    Forced Migration Review. 2007 Jan; (27):42-43.

    The following is extracted by the FMR editors from a recent UNFPA/UNICEF report on The Effects of Conflict on Health and Well-Being of Women and Girls in Darfur: Conversations with the Community. How do the women and girls of Darfur assess the risks they face? UNFPA and UNICEF interviewed conflict-affected women and their male household members in order to better understand priority actions needed to improve women and girls' health and well-being. The counter-insurgency strategy employed by the Government of Sudan and the Janjaweed militia appears to have been one of asset stripping and population displacement. Indiscriminate attacks on villages have not only killed and injured civilians but also destroyed or looted housing, infrastructure, community services, wells and irrigation systems, fruit trees and other property such as cattle. The result has been the large-scale movement of a highly vulnerable, traumatised population of 2.75 million people, rendered almost completely dependent on humanitarian aid for survival. (excerpt)
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