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  1. 1
    311654

    Second generation female condom available [letter]

    Nakari T

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2006 Nov; 14(28):179.

    The female condom has been on the market for over ten years but despite a clear need it has not yet been adopted for wider use. In 2005 only 14 million female condoms were distributed compared to 6-9 billion male condoms around the world. However, studies in many countries have shown that the female condom is well accepted among both women and men, and that there is demand for it. One of the problems in achieving its widespread distribution in national programmes has been its cost. In an effort to address the problem of cost, the Female Health Company has developed a second generation female condom, FC2. This new version of the female condom has similar physical characteristics to the original female condom but is made of synthetic nitrile utilising a manufacturing process which allows greater efficiencies, particularly at higher volumes. The new device has been shown in studies to be equivalent to the original female condom and has the potential for wider acceptability and utilisation since it is expected to be more affordable for individuals and programmes. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    152951

    [Contraceptive fact sheets. A tool for advisors in logistics] Fiches factuelles sur les contraceptifs. Un outil pour les conseillers en logistique.

    John Snow [JSI]. Family Planning Logistics Management Project

    Arlington, Virginia, JSI, Family Planning Logistics Management Project, 1998. [15] p. (USAID Contract No. CCP-C-00-95-00028-04)

    This guide lists the visual indicators of eventual quality problems, special considerations, donors, manufacturers, brands, shelf life, primary and secondary conditioning, units per shipping crate, and the dimensions and weights of boxes of the following contraceptive methods: condoms, oral contraceptive pills, IUDs, injectables, contraceptive implants, spermicides, and other vaginal barrier methods. These methods are presented in different categories according to donor: USAID, IPPF, or FNUAP. These data are provided as a tool to consultants in logistics. References are given for additional information on each method discussed.
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  3. 3
    066745
    Peer Reviewed

    Role of planned parenthood for enrichment of the quality of life in Sri Lanka.

    Chinnatamby S

    CEYLON MEDICAL JOURNAL. 1990 Dec; 35(4):136-42.

    The story of the Sri Lankan Family Planning movement is told from its inception in 1953, prompted by a visit by Margaret Sanger 1952. The Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka was founded with the health of women and children, and both contraception and infertility treatment as its policies. The first clinic, called the "Mothers Welfare Clinic," treated women for complications of multiparity: one woman was para 26 and had not menstruated in 33 years. The clinic distributed vaginal barriers, spermicides and condoms, but the initial continuation rate was <5% year. Sri Lanka joined the IPPF in 1954. In 1959, after training at the Worcester Foundation, and a personal visit by Pincus, the writer supervised distribution of oral contraceptives in a pilot project with 118 women for 2 years. Each pill user was seen by a physician, house surgeon, midwife, nurse and social worker. In 1958 Sweden funded family planning projects in a village and an estate that reduced the birth rate 10% in 2 years. The Sri Lankan government officially adopted a family planning policy in 1965, and renewed the bilateral agreement with Sweden for 3 years. In 1968 the government instituted an integrated family planning and maternal and child health program under its Maternal and Child Health Bureau. This was expanded in 1971 to form the Family Health Bureau, instrumental in lowering the maternal death rate from 2.4/1000 in 1965 to 0.4 in 1984. During this period IUDs, Depo Provera, Norplant, and both vasectomy and interval female sterilizations, both with 1 small incision under local anesthesia, and by laparoscopic sterilization were adopted. Remarkable results were being achieved in treating infertile copies, even from the beginning, often by merely counseling people on the proper timing of intercourse in the cycle, or offering artificial insemination of the husband's semen. Factors contributing to the success of the Sri Lankan planned parenthood program included 85% female literacy, training of health and NGO leaders, government participation, approval of religious leaders, rising age of marriage to 24 years currently, and access of all modern methods.
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