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  1. 1
    285058
    Peer Reviewed

    Obstructed labour.

    Neilson JP; Lavender T; Quenby S; Wray S

    British Medical Bulletin. 2003; 67:191-204.

    Obstructed labour is an important cause of maternal deaths in communities in which undernutrition in childhood is common resulting in small pelves in women, and in which there is no easy access to functioning health facilities with the capability of carrying out operative deliveries. Obstructed labour also causes significant maternal morbidity in the short term (notably infection) and long term (notably obstetric fistulas). Fetal death from asphyxia is also common. There are differences in the behaviour of the uterus during obstructed labour, depending on whether the woman has delivered previously. The pattern in primigravid women (typically diminishing contractility with risk of infection and fistula) may result from tissue acidosis, whereas in parous women, contractility may be maintained with the risk of uterine rupture. Ultimately, tackling the problem of obstructed labour will require universal adequate nutritional intake from childhood and the ability to access adequately equipped and staffed clinical facilities when problems arise in labour. These seem still rather distant aspirations. In the meantime, strategies should be implemented to encourage early recognition of prolonged labour and appropriate clinical responses. The sequelae of obstructed labour can be an enormous source of human misery and the prevention of obstetric fistulas, and skilled treatment if they do occur, are important priorities in regions where obstructed labour is still common. (author's)
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  2. 2
    650019

    The biochemistry and microbiology of the female and male genital tracts: report of a WHO Scientific Group.

    WHO SCIENTIFIC GROUP

    Geneva, World Health Organization, 1965. (World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 313.) 15 p.

    A WHO Scientific Group on the Biochemistry and Microbiology of the Female and Male Genital Tracts met in Geneva on April 20-26, 1965. It was the sixth of a series of meetings giving detailed consideration to the biology of human reproduction. Topics investigated included: 1) the chemistry and enzymology of the uterus; 2) sperm transport; 3) capacitation and the acrosome reaction; 4) nidation and placentation; 5) the chemistry and enzymology of semen; 6) the effects of cadmium, zinc, and selenium compounds on reproduction; and 7) microbiology. The Group considered that many of the subjects discussed required further investigation. The discussions repeatedly indicated the need for more broadly based comparative studies in the physiology of reproduction. They also underlined the need for more extensive studies in primates, particularly with a view to determining the time of ovulation and the reaction of uterine tissues to the changing stages of the cycle and of pregnancy. The importance of viewing the male and female components in reproduction as an integrated whole rather than as isolated events was stressed.
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  3. 3
    640030

    Biology of human reproduction.

    WHO SCIENTIFIC GROUP

    Geneva, World Health Organization, 1964. (Technical Report Series No. 280.) 30 p.

    A WHO Scientific Group on the Biology of Human Reproduction was convened in Geneva from April 2-8, 1963, for the purpose of advising the Director-General on developments and major research needs in that field. The biology of human reproduction is an extremely broad scientific topic, which impinges to some degree on virtually all the basic medical disciplines. Major topics included in the report are: 1) comparative aspects of reproduction; 2) neuroendocrine aspects of reproduction; 3) biology of the gonads and gametes; 4) gestation; 5) biochemistry of the sex steroids; 6) immunological aspects of reproduction; and 7) pharmacological aspects of reproduction. The Group recommends: 1) that WHO assist in the development of fundamental knowledge of the biology of human reproduction and of other fields on which that knowledge is based and 2) that WHO convene meetings of appropriate specialist groups to consider practical methods of implementing certain proposals concerning organization of surveys, provision of services, and promotion of relevant research.
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  4. 4
    795766

    International fertility research program sponsors effort in 43 lands to develop new, safer methods.

    International Family Planning Perspectives. 1979 Sep; 5(3):127-9.

    The International Fertility Research Program (IFRP) is sponsoring research in 30 developing countries and 13 developed nations in an effort to develop more effective contraceptive methods. Particular emphasis is being placed on developing contraceptives for women in developing countries where nutritional, health, and sanitation conditions make current methods either difficult or less effective to use. Trials of a pill regimen including vitamin supplementation are underway in Sri Lanka, and a progestogen-only pill for use by lactating women is being tested in Egypt and India. Progestogens apparently do not modify the content of maternal milk. Another study involves the testing of a Lippes loop which releases Trasylol, a bleeding suppressant, in an effort to overcome bleeding problems associated with IUD use. The IFRP has developed and is testing biodegradable appendages which can be attached to IUDs to help retain the device in postpartum women during the period when the uterus is enlarged. Other efforts are being directed toward improving and simplifying sterilization procedures. In Chile, pellets of quinacrine have been inserted into the upper area of the uterus. As the pellets dissolve the quinacrine enters the tubes and produces scar tissue which eventually closes the tube. This research may pave the way toward the development of a non-surgical sterilization method. Animal studies of a reversible sterilization procedure in which a condom-like device is fitted over the ends of the tubes are in progress. In another project a modified laparoscope, called the Laprocator, is being evaluated. The device does not use electricity and is particularly suitable for use in areas in which electricity is lacking or the source is unstable. The device is used in a procedure called suprapubic endoscopy in which only a small incision is needed. Insufflation of the abdomen is unnecessary, and elastic rings are used to close the tubes. IFRP will undertake an innovative motivational project in the Middle East during the coming religious holidays.
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  5. 5
    027287

    Biological approaches to ovulation detection.

    Bonnar J

    In: Jeffcoate SL, ed. Ovulation: methods for its prediction and detection. Chichester, England, John Wiley, 1983. 33-47. (Current Topics in Reproductive Endocrinology Volume 3)

    This chapter reviews certain recognizable biological effects that occur due to the major changes in the circulating blood levels of estrogen and progesterone and discusses the ongoing use of these biological signals for the self detection of ovulation and the fertile phase of the cycle. These biological changes include the basal body temperature, changes in the cervix and its mucus secretion, mittelschmerz, and the menstrual cycle molimina. The calculation or calendar method is the oldest technique for determining the fertile period and followed the work of Ogino (1930) and Knaus (1933). The fertile phase of the cycle was identified from the records of the previous 6-12 menstrual cycles. The potential fertile period was then calculated on the following basis: define the shortest and the longest menstrual cycle over the preceding 6 and preferable 12 cycles; the 1st day of the potentially fertile phase is the longest cycle minus 11 days. For a women whose menstrual cycles have varied between 26-31 days, the potential fertile period would be days 8-20 of the cycle. The greatest weakness of the calendar calculation is that it depends on a prediction, based on the menstrual history, of what is likely to occur and not on what is actually taking place. Very rapid electronic thermometers are now available which offer considerable advantages over the clinical thermometer. The daily taking and charting of the basal body temperature (BBT) is the simplest and most widely used method for detecting ovulation. To overcome the drawbacks of the calendar method and the BBT method for identifying the fertile period, John and Evelyn Billings of Melbourne in the early 1970s developed the ovulation method. Self recognition of cervical mucus symptoms provides the woman with a simple means of detecting the fertile phase of her cycle and the likely time of ovulation. Individual cycle variation in the preovulatory duration of the symptoms limits the position of the prediction, yet the "peak" day correlates better with the time of ovulation than the shift in BBT. In addition to effects on cervical mucus, estrogen also changes the morphology of the cervix. The preovulatory rise in estrogensoftens the tissues of the cervix and opens the cervical os. The softened cervix and gaping os with a cascade of clear mucus is a sign of optimal estrogen response and of imminent ovulation. A World Health Organization (WHO) multicenter study of the ovulation method provided a substantial amount of information of the normal menstrual cycle of a large number of women of proven fertility in the age group 18-39 years whose cycles were not influenced by the use of hormonal or other contraceptive methods.
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