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Your search found 9 Results

  1. 1
    306783

    Toolkit to improve private provider contributions to child health: introduction and development of national and district strategies.

    Prysor-Jones S; Tawfik Y; Bery R; Wolff A; Bennett L 3d

    Washington, D.C., Academy for Educational Development [AED], Support for Analysis and Research in Africa [SARA], 2005 Jun. 50 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PN-ADF-758; USAID Contract No. AOT-C-00-99-00237-00)

    June 2002, the World Bank published a discussion paper titled Working with the Private Sector for Child Health. The paper--developed with technical assistance from the USAID Bureau for Africa, Office of Sustainable Development (AFR/SD) through the Support for Analysis and Research in Africa (SARA) project--lays out a framework for analyzing the contributions of the private sector in child heath. The framework, outlined below, is designed to serve as a basis for assessing the potential of different components of the private sector at country level. The framework identifies the following components of the private sector as being important for child health: Service providers (formal sector, other for-profit, employers, non-governmental organizations [NGOs], private voluntary organizations [PVOs], and traditional healers); Pharmaceutical companies; Pharmacies; Drug vendors and shopkeepers; Food producers; Media channels; Private suppliers of products related to child health, e.g. ITNs; Health insurance companies. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    306773

    Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus. GDF / MSH Drug Management Consultant Training Workshop in Vietnam: trip report.

    Moore T

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2005 Nov 11. 12 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-076; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    More than eight million people become sick with Tuberculosis (TB) each year. TB continues to be a major international killer disease because of poor access to effective high quality medicines, irrational treatment decisions and behaviors, and counterproductive financial priorities by some national health systems that impede progress. Access to TB medicines is becoming less of a problem as both first and second-line TB treatments are made available to developing countries through global initiatives such as the Global TB Drug Facility (GDF) and the Green Light Committee (GLC) of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Stop TB department in Geneva. Since 2001 Management Sciences for Health (MSH) through the USAID-funded Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus (RPM Plus) program has collaborated with Stop TB to promote better overall TB drug management by GDF and GLC secretariats and by national TB control programs. RPM Plus activities include technical assistance to the GDF and the GLC to develop program monitoring tools, conduct TB program monitoring missions to recipient countries of GDF drugs, audits of monitoring missions conducted by partner organizations and training workshops on TB pharmaceutical management. GDF and GLC secretariats operate with minimal staffs and both depend greatly on partner organizations to carry out the necessary in-country work to make sure TB medicines are received, distributed and used according to guidelines. The number of countries receiving GDF and GLC support is ever increasing requiring even more assistance from partner organizations like MSH/RPM Plus. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    306772

    Trip report: World Health Organization TB consultant training in Sondalo, Italy, October 6-8, 2005.

    Moore T

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2005 Oct. 13 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-075; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    USAID, through its SO5 TB global objective, promotes TB pharmaceutical management activities through the RPM Plus program. The global activities support the DOTS scheme, a WHO initiative, documented to break the transmission of TB when implemented correctly by national TB programs (NTP). One of the five primary elements of the DOTS scheme is an uninterrupted supply of TB drugs. RPM Plus provides technical assistance to the following WHO/Stop TB organizations: The Global TB Drug Facility (GDF): established in 2001 to provide free grants of TB medicines to countries unable to satisfy their medicine needs and to serve as a source of good quality TB drugs for those countries having their own funds; The Green Light Committee (GLC): technical support group for the DOTS Plus program. Initiated by the WHO and its partners to promote the correct treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. The GLC makes medicines available to countries at affordable prices. As part of the global support RPM Plus also provides training in Pharmaceutical Management for TB at various World Health Organization consultant-training courses promoted by the Stop TB Department. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    305660

    Guinea PRISM II Project: 2005 annual report (English).

    Diallo T

    Cambridge, Massachusetts, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Guinea PRISM II Project, 2005 Oct. 59 p. (Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-471; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. 675-A-00-03-00037-00)

    The PRISM project (Pour Renforcer les Interventions en Santé Reproductive et MST/SIDA) is an initiative of the Republic of Guinea as part of its bilateral cooperation with the United States of America designed to increase the utilization of quality reproductive health services. The project is funded by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and is implemented by Management Sciences for Health (MSH) in collaboration with the John Hopkins University/Center for Communication Programs (JHU/CCP) and Engenderhealth. The project's intervention zones correspond to the natural region of Upper Guinea as well as Kissidougou prefecture, thus covering all of the 9 prefectures of Kankan and Faranah administrative regions. This annual report covers the activities and results of PRISM over the fiscal year 2005, October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2005. Like all of PRISM's activity reports, the present report is structured according to the 4 intermediate result areas: (1) increased access to reproductive health services and products, (2) improved quality of services at health facilities, (3) increased demand of reproductive health services and products (4) improved coordination of health interventions. The report consists of three parts. The first part presents the introduction, an executive summary, and the summary of the principal results attained over the course of the year in each of the four intermediate results (IR). The second part presents in detail for each IR the project's strategies and approaches, the implemented activities and the results attained over the course of the year. The third part presents the operational aspects having had an impact on the project over the course of the year. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    304801

    Civil society involvement in rapid assessment, analysis and action planning (RAAAP) for orphans and vulnerable children. An independent review.

    Gosling L

    London, England, UK Consortium on AIDS and International Development, 2005 Jul. 63 p. (Orphans and Vulnerable Children)

    The Rapid Assessment, Analysis, and Action Planning (RAAAP) Initiative for orphans and other vulnerable children (OVC) was launched by UNICEF, USAID, UNAIDS, and WFP in November 2003. The first round of RAAAPs were carried out in 16 countries in Sub-Saharan Africa in 2004. The purpose of the RAAAP is to undertake an analysis of the situation of OVC and the response in each country, and then, based on this analysis, to produce a national plan of action to scale up and improve the quality of the response to OVC. This plan is then ratified by the government and provides a unifying framework that brings together the activities of all the different stakeholders under a set of common objectives and strategies. This includes all interventions for OVC, including activities of national and local government, donors and civil society organisations (CSOs). The first round of the RAAAP process consisted of a desk study, additional data collection and analysis in country, and a stakeholder workshop to validate the findings and draw up the OVC National Plan of Action. The process was led and coordinated by a national steering group which consisted of the government ministry with responsibility for OVC, other relevant government ministries and departments, development partners including UNICEF, USAID, UNAIDS and WFP and representatives of civil society organisations (CSO). The involvement of different stakeholders in the analysis and planning process is critical for ensuring their ownership of the resulting action plan. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    303435

    You are special. For children living in families affected by HIV / AIDS.

    Dunbar M

    [Arlington, Virginia], FHI, IMPACT, [2005]. [38] p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-97-00017-00; USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No. PN-ADE-207)

    There is no one like you in the whole world. You have your own appearance, ability and talents. When your family is affected by HIV/AIDS you will discover new strengths and ways to cope when you face difficulties. You are a wonderful seed like the lotus seed. A beautiful lotus pond starts from one small lotus seed. You are a wonderful seed like the lotus seed. In you there is understanding and love and many different talents. From our ancestors we receive many talents. For example our ability to run fast, to sing beautifully, to make things with our hands, are all seeds we inherit from our ancestors. We also inherit seeds that are not so nice like the seeds of fear and anger. These seeds of fear and anger can make us unhappy. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    300755

    HIV / AIDS, law and human rights: a handbook for Russian legislators.

    Narkevich MI; Polubinskaya SV

    Moscow, Russia, Transatlantic Partners Against AIDS, 2005. 52 p.

    The purpose of this Handbook is to assist members of the Federation Council and deputies of the State Duma of the Russian Federation, and other Russian officials on the federal and regional levels, in enacting appropriate legislation and legislative reform to address AIDS, whether they be initiatives prohibiting discrimination against PLWHA or members of highly vulnerable groups, laws guaranteeing reliable HIV prevention information for all Russian citizens, or other policy priorities — and ensuring adequate fiscal and other resources to support them. This Handbook provides examples of the best legislative and regulatory practices gathered from around the world. Best practices are given for each of the 12 guidelines contained in the International Guidelines on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights, published in 1998 by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (UNHCHR) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). The Handbook also presents detailed information on the Russian AIDS epidemic with regard to the establishment and implementation of these Guidelines. Most importantly, the Handbook outlines concrete recommendations on measures that legislators can take to protect human rights and promote public health in responding to the epidemic. (author's)
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  8. 8
    300218

    Access to Clinical and Community Maternal, Neonatal and Women’s Health Services Program. ACCESS. Year one annual report, 1 October 2004 - 30 September 2005.

    JHPIEGO. Access to Clinical and Community Maternal, Neonatal and Women’s Health Services Program [ACCESS]

    [Baltimore, Maryland], JHPIEGO, ACCESS, 2005 Oct. [50] p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. GHS-A-00-04-00002-00)

    The Access to Clinical and Community Maternal, Neonatal and Women’s Health Services (ACCESS) Program launched its mission to improve maternal and newborn health and survival in developing countries worldwide in July 2004, with program implementation beginning October 1, 2004. In its first year, ACCESS had three field-supported country programs; now—one year later— the Program has nine country programs, four Malaria Action Coalition (MAC) countries, and ongoing activities in another 16 countries worldwide. This rapid expansion of field-based programming reflects countries’ growing confidence and interest in ACCESS as they seek to reduce continued high rates of maternal and newborn mortality. Over the past year, ACCESS has become increasingly recognized as a global leader for policy and advocacy, technical expertise, and implementing evidence-based interventions and approaches in maternal and newborn health. Because ACCESS is implemented through such a rich partnership, the Program has demonstrated the technical and programmatic expertise to both advocate for and support the full range of maternal and newborn health care interventions from the household to the referral level. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    285465

    Protecting youth from AIDS in the developing world.

    Carrino CA

    Global Issues. 2005 Jan; 11-13.

    Numbering 1.7 billion, today’s youths are the largest generation ever to enter the transition to adulthood. Comprising 30 percent of the population in the developing world, young people present a set of urgent economic, social, and political challenges that are crucial to long-term progress and stability. The values, attitudes, and skills acquired by this generation of young men and women—and the choices they make— will influence the course of current events and shape our future world in fundamental ways. Youths are encountering formative stages in life. When given a chance to participate, youths have played a catalytic role in promoting democracy, increasing incomes, helping communities develop, and slowing the AIDS epidemic. In Uganda and Zambia, teens and young adults have been key to reducing HIV infection rates through their adoption of more responsible behaviors. (excerpt)
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