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  1. 1
    306773

    Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus. GDF / MSH Drug Management Consultant Training Workshop in Vietnam: trip report.

    Moore T

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2005 Nov 11. 12 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-076; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    More than eight million people become sick with Tuberculosis (TB) each year. TB continues to be a major international killer disease because of poor access to effective high quality medicines, irrational treatment decisions and behaviors, and counterproductive financial priorities by some national health systems that impede progress. Access to TB medicines is becoming less of a problem as both first and second-line TB treatments are made available to developing countries through global initiatives such as the Global TB Drug Facility (GDF) and the Green Light Committee (GLC) of the World Health Organization's (WHO) Stop TB department in Geneva. Since 2001 Management Sciences for Health (MSH) through the USAID-funded Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus (RPM Plus) program has collaborated with Stop TB to promote better overall TB drug management by GDF and GLC secretariats and by national TB control programs. RPM Plus activities include technical assistance to the GDF and the GLC to develop program monitoring tools, conduct TB program monitoring missions to recipient countries of GDF drugs, audits of monitoring missions conducted by partner organizations and training workshops on TB pharmaceutical management. GDF and GLC secretariats operate with minimal staffs and both depend greatly on partner organizations to carry out the necessary in-country work to make sure TB medicines are received, distributed and used according to guidelines. The number of countries receiving GDF and GLC support is ever increasing requiring even more assistance from partner organizations like MSH/RPM Plus. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    306772

    Trip report: World Health Organization TB consultant training in Sondalo, Italy, October 6-8, 2005.

    Moore T

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus, 2005 Oct. 13 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-075; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    USAID, through its SO5 TB global objective, promotes TB pharmaceutical management activities through the RPM Plus program. The global activities support the DOTS scheme, a WHO initiative, documented to break the transmission of TB when implemented correctly by national TB programs (NTP). One of the five primary elements of the DOTS scheme is an uninterrupted supply of TB drugs. RPM Plus provides technical assistance to the following WHO/Stop TB organizations: The Global TB Drug Facility (GDF): established in 2001 to provide free grants of TB medicines to countries unable to satisfy their medicine needs and to serve as a source of good quality TB drugs for those countries having their own funds; The Green Light Committee (GLC): technical support group for the DOTS Plus program. Initiated by the WHO and its partners to promote the correct treatment of multi-drug resistant (MDR) TB. The GLC makes medicines available to countries at affordable prices. As part of the global support RPM Plus also provides training in Pharmaceutical Management for TB at various World Health Organization consultant-training courses promoted by the Stop TB Department. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    279034

    Use of maternity register data in Benin.

    Kodjogbé N; Fourn L; Stanton C

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center [CPC], MEASURE Evaluation, 2003 Aug. [34] p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-97-00018-00)

    This report describes a study of the content and use of routinely collected data from maternity registers for the purposes of monitoring for maternal and newborn health at the health facility level in two departments of Benin. Specifically, the objectives of the study are to: Describe the scope, quality, completeness and use of the information collected in maternity registers in the departments of Atlantique and Zou; Calculate indicators which reflect clinical practices and outcome, such as: the cesarean section rate (for health facilities with surgical capacity), the referral rate, the rate of referred patients who are treated at the referral site, the episiotomy rate, the rate of “directed” deliveries (i.e., deliveries where oxytocics were used) and stillbirth and maternal death rates in health facilities in the departments of Atlantique and Zou; Validate the data regarding cesarean section operations recorded in the delivery register against that recorded in the surgical register; Describe the process by which data are recorded in the maternity registers. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    274018

    Drug procurement for tuberculosis training course in Vietnam, July 13-22, 2001.

    Moore T

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health [MSH], Center for Pharmaceutical Management, Rational Pharmaceutical Management Plus Program, 2001. iv, 9 p. (USAID Contract No. HRN-A-00-00-00016-00)

    As part of its contribution to USAID’s SO5—reduce the threat of infectious diseases of major public health importance, the Rational Pharmaceutical Management (RPM) Plus program is providing technical support to the national Tuberculosis (TB) program in Vietnam through the SO5 ID/TB Activity 3: Conduct TB drug procurement training in Vietnam. The RPM Plus assistance will facilitate Vietnam’s procurement of TB drugs under a secured World Bank project. Thomas Moore of RPM Plus and Hugo Vrakking of Royal Netherlands Tuberculosis Association (KNCV) traveled to Vietnam to conduct the training course. The Ministry of Health (MOH) has recently reorganized its procurement department, devolving procurement activities to respective vertical programs such as Tuberculosis, Malaria, and Hematology. Course participants (listed in Annex 1: Proceedings of the Training Workshop—Vietnam) are members of the management committee of the national TB program (NTP). All are expected to play some part in the procurement of TB drugs. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    003645

    Program report [of the Central America regional seminar-workshop entitled] New Focuses of Family Planning Program Administration: Analysis of Contraceptive Prevalence Surveys and Other Program Data, [held in] Antigua, Guatemala, May 25-30, 1980.

    Centre for Population Activities [CEFPA]

    [Washington, D.C., CEFPA, 1980.] 30 p. (Contract AID/pha-c-1187)

    This report 1) presents a summary of the planning process of the seminar-workshop in family planning held in Antigua, Guatemala from May 25-30, 1980; 2) reviews program content and training methodology; and 3) provides feedback on the evaluation of the program and in-country follow-up responses to the workshop. Negotiations were made between the Centre for Population Activities (CEFPA) officials, USAID (U.S. Agency for International Development) population/health officials, and family planning officials from each participating country to elicit program suggestions and support. The ensuing communication process facilitated the development of the program in many ways, including: 1) program design, which incorporated in-country family planning program needs, suggested workshop topics, and country-specific requests for workshop objective; 2) participant selection; and 3) USAID mission commitment. The workshop aimed to provide an opportunity for leaders of family planning and related programs to make an intelligent and effective use of data available to them. The training methodology consisted of structured small-group exercises. Program content included: 1) contraceptive prevalence survey case exercise, which aims to identify problem areas and need in the delivery of family planning and maternal child health services as a tool in assessing progress towards family planning goals; 2) other data sources available to family planning program managers, including World Fertility Survey data and program service statistics; 3) program alternatives in the form of mini-workshops on such topics as logistics management, improving clinic efficiency, primary health and family planning, adolescent fertility, and voluntary sterilization; and 4) program planning, which enables participants to interpret data and apply them in the planning process. In evaluating the workshop, a majority of the participants reported that the workshop and their own personal objectives were either completely or almost completely achieved, and they also indicated that more workshops at the regional and national levels should be conducted.
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  6. 6
    271441

    The role of participant training in building social science capabilities in Asia.

    Kumar K

    Washington, D.C., U.S. Agency for International Development, Center for Development Information and Evaluation, Bureau for Program and Policy Coordination, 1989 Aug. vi, 7 p. (A.I.D. Evaluation Occasional Paper No. 32)

    A comprehensive survey of social scientists who received financial support for overseas graduate training from an International Donor Agency focussed on the contribution of such training to the national building efforts in the social science discipline. A questionnaire was mailed to 1506 participants in Asian countries, which included 562 USAID trainees. The findings suggest that 1) trainees considered the social assistance provided by the agencies to be adequate, even though difficulty was experienced in travel and immigration arrangements, 2) problems encountered on return to their countries were mainly employment-related, due to either lack of equipment, institutional interest in research, or inadequate economic rewards. In addition, non-availability of professional books, lack of opportunities to attend overseas professional meetings and difficulty in getting information on developments in their major were factors which reduced further professional development. Most participants indicated that the knowledge and skills acquired from their training proved to be valuable. Furthermore, this data does not support the hypothesis that overseas trained participants gravitate to industrialized nations. It was found that in Asia such training provided the much needed expertise to lay the foundation for empirical research. Major concerns of the participants were the 1) underepresentation of women in such training programs, 2) lack of proficiency in English of participants, and 3) loss of contacts between participants and funding agencies.
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  7. 7
    056564

    PRITECH process evaluation of the ORT component of the Primary Health Care Financing Project.

    Schlendorf J; Basilio J; Brown R; Chang J; Steinwand R; Tomaro JB

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health, Technologies for Primary Health Care, 1988. 51, [43] p. (USAID Contract No. AID/DPE-5927-C-00-3083-00)

    Personal interview, site visits to Regions VII and VIII (Philippines), and record reviews were the principal methods used to evaluate the Oral Rehydration Therapy (ORT) component of the Primary Health Care Financing (PHCF) Project designed to increase the use of oral rehydration therapy as a primary preventive measure against diarrheal death among infants and young children. The project is designed to increase ORT utilization through a 2-pronged approach which creates demand for ORS products through training physicians, nurses, midwives, and health educators in the public and private sectors; and information, education, and communication campaigns to promote ORT among the public. The most serious concern regarding clinical training was the poor quality of case management observed in regional, provincial, and district hospitals. There seems to be no national plan or budget for the production of print materials to support IEC program activities. A wide disparity was found between projected demand and actual use of ORS, called ORESOL. The present distribution practices of the Department of Health translate to oversupply or nonavailability of ORS. Private sector pharmaceutical firms take a limited/traditional approach to product distribution, and commercial distributors capable of reaching the rural population should be identified and encouraged to market ORS.
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  8. 8
    040610

    Population/family health overview: Madagascar.

    Ferguson-Bisson D; Lecomte J

    Washington, D.C., International Science and Technology Institute, Population Technical Assistance Project, 1985 Aug 8. v, 7, [4] p. (Report No. 85-48-018; Contract No. DPE-3024-C-00-4063-00)

    The objectives of the consultation in Madagascar were to review existing policies and programs in population and family health, to assess government and nongovernment plans and capabilities to program implementation, to review other donor activities, to identify constraints impeding population and family planning activities, and to prepare recommendations for the US Agency for International Development (USAID) assistance to Madagascar. Although the government has no officially proclaimed population policy, there is increasing direct support of family planning. The private family planning association, Fianakaviana Sambatra (FISA) was officially recognized in 1967 and is permitted to import and distribute contraceptives. Sale of contraceptives in private pharmacies also is permitted. The major organization providing family planning services is FISA. The Ministry of Health (MOH) system does not include contraceptive services as part of its health care services, but at the request of MOH physicians, FISA provides services in 40 MOH facilities. Private pharmacies account for most of the contraceptive distribution, with oral contraceptives (OCs) being sold by prescriptions written by private physicians or, on occasion, by public health physicians. Contraceptive services also are provided in the medical centers of at least 3 organizations: JIRAMA, the water and electricity parastatal; SOLIMA, the petroleum parastatal; and OSTIE, a group of private enterprises that has its own health care system. A Catholic organization, FTK (Natural Family Planning Association) provides education and training in natural family planning. Demographic research has not been accorded a high priority in Madagascar. Consequently, the country's capabilities in the area are relatively limited. At this time, demographic research is carried out within several institutional structures. The major donor in the area of population/family planning is UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). Activities of the UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) in the area of health are relevant to the planned USAID assistance. For several years, USAID has provided population assistance to Madagascar through its centrally funded projects. Recommendations are presented in order of descending importance according to priorities determined by the consultation team: population policy; training/sensitization of the medical community; support to existing private voluntary organizations; demographic statistics and research; information, education, and communication; and collection and reinforcement of health statistics. In regard to population policy, assistance should be directed to 2 general objectives: providing guidance to the government in deciding which stance it ultimately wishes to adopt officially with regard to population; and encouraging the systematic incorporation of demographic factors into sectoral development planning.
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  9. 9
    024113

    Evaluation of the program for International Training in Health (INTRAH).

    Boynton WH; Daulaire NM; Revson JE; Johnson EM

    [Unpublished] 1983. 76 p.

    Report of a 4 week evaluation of the INTRAH project supported by USAID. Field visits included Somalia, Kenya, Tanzania, Tunisia and Mali with stopovers elsewhere. The INTRAH concept of training Africans in family planning was found to be sound, and the training was universally well received. The potential for further activities is great as the concept of family planning as a component of maternal child health gains rapid acceptance. Implementation was found to need improvement: more comprehensive country background is needed which would lead to a broader selection of institutions and trainers; teaching methodology has been emphasized over technical and clinical skills; the importance of family planning for spacing should be recognized; overseas training has been inconsistent and poorly coordinated and the choice of participants in "training of trainers" courses not always satisfactory. Inadequate staffing is seen as the main problem; subcontracting for health professionals has contributed to loss of continuity and coherence. Several FP/MCH professionals should be added to the INTRAH staff. Routine administration of the project is well developed and development of regional offices and training centers is underway. Coordination with USAID is generally good, although there have been problems over approval of consultants--clearance time should be shortened. Because AID funding has been lower than planned, it is crucial that INTRAH be informed of future intentions as soon as possible.
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  10. 10
    022392

    AID support of laparoscopy overseas: 1973-1983.

    Wiley AT; Speidel JJ

    [Unpublished] [1983]. 12 p.

    In 1972 the US Agency for International Development (USAID) began to provide funds to Johns Hopkins and other universities to train developing country personnel in laparoscopic sterilization technique. The demand for this training and AID's perceived need for a mechanism to provide developing country doctors with current training in family planning and other aspects of reproductive health led, in 1974, to the creation of the Johns Hopkins Program for International Education in Gynecology and Obstetrics (JHPIEGO). One of its purposes was to provide short-term training in laparoscopy for overseas physicians and to arrange for distribution and maintenance of laparoscopic equipment. JHPIEGO was also conceived of as a broad based program for training in reproductive health emphasizing the important role that family planning plays in reproductive health. Most of this USAID supported training now takes place in medical centers in the developing countries. The training usually consists of 2-4 weeks of didactic and clinical work in many aspects of reproductive health of which training in laparoscopy is often an important part. After the laparoscopic training, each qualifying trainee is visited at his/her own hospital by a consultant who helps set up the laparoscopic equipment for use. A significant number of supervised laparoscopic procedures are then performed by the trainee over a period of several days. When the consultant trainer is satisfied with the skill of the particular trainee, a laparoscopic unit is given to the trainee's institution. By September 1983, 2500 physicians from approximately 100 countries had received this type of JHPIEGO training, and more than 1600 of them have since been provided with laparoscopies at their home institutions. USAID funded laparoscopic training and equipment and other types of training and equipment also have been provided to the developing countries by the Association for Voluntary Sterilization (AVS). These 2 groups have now cumulatively provided laparoscopic training for at least 3800 physicians from developing countries. The Falope Ring applicator is now in use throughout the world, and JHPIEGO and AVS have converted their overseas laparoscopes to include this capability and for the past 5 years all laparoscopes supplied by USAID have had this Falope Ring capability. The laprocator, a simplified laparoscope which is designed for use of the Falope Ring, was developed in response to USAID's interest in lowering costs and maintenance requirements. USAID has provided over 1000 of these simplified systems to more than 75 developing countries. The use of laparoscopy in the voluntary sterilization programs of the Philippines, in India, and in Africa are reviewed. Voluntary sterilization has grown each year in popularity and is now the method of birth control in most widespread use around the world.
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