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  1. 1
    097672

    Breastfeeding. COTALMA: training health professionals.

    Casanovas MC

    MOTHERS AND CHILDREN. 1994; 13(1):3.

    The Comite Tecnico de Apoyo a la Lactancia Materna (COTALMA), the Technical Breastfeeding Support Committee, was founded in Bolivia in 1989. It is financed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). It is administered in coordination with the Ministry of Health (MOH). MOH and UNICEF choose the hospitals, who send teams that include a pediatrician, a gynecologist, a nurse, and a nutritionist. The first phase of the course (5.5 days) covers the scientific background of breastfeeding. A baseline study is then planned and conducted at each hospital. 2 to 3 months later, the second phase takes place during which data is presented and breast feeding programs are developed for each hospital. Communication, training, counseling, and planning and evaluation are covered. Practicums are conducted at hospitals. Trainers are usually members of COTALMA. The person in charge of maternal and child health services at MOH lectures on national health policies concerning mothers and children. Training includes use of the national health card, breastfeeding and child survival, and breastfeeding as a family planning method. Culturally appropriate course materials, which are in Spanish, are adapted from those developed by Wellstart International. Articles by COTALMA members and others are added. Participants are encouraged to train all staff at their institutions.
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  2. 2
    069044

    Trip report: Uganda.

    Casazza LJ; Newman J; Graeff J; Prins A

    Arlington, Virginia, Management Sciences for Health, Technologies for Primary Health Care [PRITECH], 1991. [41] p. (USAID Contract No. DPE-5969-Z-00-7064-00)

    Representatives from several nongovernmental organizations visited Uganda in February-March 1991 to help the Control of Diarrheal Disease (CCD) program bolster its ability to advance case management, training, and supervision of health care professionals. Specifically, the team focussed its activities on determining a strategy to create a national level diarrhea training unit (DTU) centered around case management for medical officers, interns and residents, medical students, and nurses. Similarly, it participated in developing a strategy for training traditional healers in diarrhea case management and for inservice training for health inspectors (preventive health workers). The team presented a generic model for a training/support system to the DTU faculty and CDD program manager. The model centered on what needs to be done to ensure that the local clinic health worker manages diarrhea cases properly and instructs mothers effectively to manage diarrhea. Further, in addition to comprehensive case management, content included interpersonal communication at all levels supplemented by supervision and training skills. It encouraged a participatory approach for training. In addition, it strongly encouraged the DTU faculty and CDD program staff to follow up on training activities such as supporting trainees and reinforcing skills learned in the training course. The team met with relevant government, university, and donor representatives to learn more about existing or proposed CDD activities. Further, the CDD program asked team members to assist informally in the surveyor training session for the WHO/CDD Health Facilities Survey. The team also spoke to WHO/CDD staff about its plans and future activities. WHO/CDD was concerned that training in interpersonal skills not weaken the quality of training in diarrhea case management.
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