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  1. 1
    803499

    Programmatic requirements for new means of fertility control.

    Speidel JJ

    In: Zatuchni GI, Labbok MH, Sciarra JJ, eds. Research frontiers in fertility regulation. Hagerstown, Maryland, Harper and Row, 1980. 58-63. (PARFR Series on Fertility Regulation)

    The important characteristics of a contraceptive are as follows: 1) sex of the user; 2) duration of effectiveness; 3) probability and ease of reversibility; 4) timing of use; 5) ability to be used after the suspicion or recognition of conception; 6) mode of applciation; 7) frequency of use; 8) safety and side-effects; 9) contraceptive effectiveness; 10) need for continuing volition or motivation to use the method; and, 11) peer approval. Scientists often underestimate the potential for misuse of even the simplest means of fertility control. One-time methods such as the IUD or sterilization have been found effective in developing countries unable to provide a continuous supply of contraceptives to their population. For the IUD, adequate follow-up care msut be available. Many methods require a sophisticated health care system. To expect physician-dependent delivery of anything but a 1-time only method as a practical approach to family planning is unrealistic. Community workers, auxiliary, and paramedical personnel have been able to reach many couples with Western style methods, e.g. pill distribution. Contraceptives like the condom can be distributed through commercial systems. By procuring contraceptive commodities competitively and in bulk, USAID has negotiated extremely low costs. From 1968-79, over $233 million was spent for these commodities.
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  2. 2
    781353

    A.I.D.'s research program to develop new and improved means of fertility control. (Statement, May 2, 1978)

    SPEIDEL JJ

    In: United States. Congress. House of Representatives. Select Committee on Population. Population and development: research in population and development: needs and capacities. Vol. 3. Hearings, May 2-4, 1978. Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, 1978. p. 287-319

    USAID, in attempts to develop and improve means of fertility control, spent $4.8 million on new ways to control corpus luteum function and block progestational activity, $4.4 million to develop gonadotropin releasing factors, and $6 million on prostaglandins as a means of inducing the menses or terminating pregnancy in the second trimester. Studies at Johns Hopkins University developed thyrotropin releasing hormones to ensure postpartum infertility without interfering with lactation. Research to improve current forms of birth control amounts to $16.5 million. Side effects of oral contraceptives, single aperture laparoscopic sterilization, reversible male sterilization, and tissue glues for non-surgical female sterilization are some of the new techniques being funded by USAID. $19 million has been allocated to evaluate contraceptive programs in developing countries. Funds have come from DHEW, the Ford foundation, the Population Council, pharmaceutical companies, and WHO. Although improved birth control is desireable, money is best spent supplying available methods to developing countries.
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