Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    077732

    Inventory of population projects in developing countries around the world, 1988/1989: multilateral organization assistance, regional organization assistance, bilateral agency assistance, non-governmental organization and other assistance.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [1990]. [12], 932 p.

    The UNFPA periodically releases a publication listing population projects supported and/or operated by various organizations. This publication also has basic demographic data and each country's population policy. The 16th edition covers the period from January 1, 1988 to June 30, 1989. The first section reviews all the countries' programs and makes up the bulk of the publication. Each division in this section begins with demographic data, followed by the government's views about population growth, specifically as it affects mortality and morbidity; fertility, nuptiality, and family; spatial distribution and urbanization; international migration. Each division next examines the population projects and external assistance. The second section examines regional, interregional, and global programs. The regional programs are divided into Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Middle East and Western Asia, and Europe. The next section lists published information sources including those used to compile the country, regional, interregional, and global reports. Other sources include periodic publications from various agencies and organizations which provide current information about population, addresses to obtain additional information, and a listing of UNFPA representatives (names, addresses, and telephone numbers) in the field. The Inventory concludes with a detailed index.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    762112

    Senegal.

    Menes RJ

    Washington, D.C., U.S. Office of International Health, Division of Planning and Evaluation, 1976. 144 p. (Syncrisis: the dynamics of health, XIX)

    This report uses available statistics to examine health conditions in Senegal and their interaction with socioeconomic development. Background data are presented, after which population, health status, nutrition, environmental health, health infrastructure, facilities, services and manpower, national health policy and planning, international organizations, and the Sahel are discussed. Diseases such as malaria, measles, tuberculosis, trachoma and venereal diseases are endemic in Senegal, and high levels of infant and childhood mortality exist throughout the country but especially in rural areas. Diarrhea, respiratory infections, and neonatal tetanus contribute to this mortality and are evidence of the poor health environment, and lack of basic services including nutrition assistance, health education, and potable water. Nutrition in Senegal appears to be good in general, but seasonal and local variations sometimes produce malnutrition. Lowered fertility rates would reduce infant and maternal mortality and morbidity and might slow the present decline in per capita food intake. At present the government of Senegal has no population policy and almost no provisions for family planning services. Health services are inadequate and inefficient, with shortages of all levels of health manpower, poor planning, and overemphasis on curative services.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    762466

    Bangladesh.

    Loomis SA

    Washington, D.C., U.S. Office of International Health, Division of Planning and Evaluation, 1976. 92 p. (Syncrisis: the dynamics of health, XVII)

    This article uses available statistics to analyze health conditions in Bangladesh and their impact on the country's socioeconomic development. Background information on the country is first given, after which population characteristics, health status, nutrition, national health policy and adminstration, health services and programs, population programs, environmental sanitation, health sector resources, financing of health care and donor assistance are examined. Bangladesh's 3% annual population increase is expected to increase already great population pressure and to have a negative impact on the health status of the population. Although reliable health statistics are lacking, infant mortality is estimated at 140 per 1000, 40% of all deaths occur in the 0-4 age group, and maternal mortality is high. Infectious diseases exacerbated by malnutrition are the main causes of death. 4 key factors are responsible for the general malnutrition: 1) rapidly growing population, 2) low per capita income, 3) high incidence of diarrheal diseases, and 4) dietary practices that restrict nutrient intake. Most of the population has access only to traditional health services, and medical education is hospital oriental and curative, with minimal emphasis on public health. The level of environmental sanitation is extremely low.
    Add to my documents.