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  1. 1
    328215

    Repositioning family planning: Guidelines for advocacy action. Le repositionnement de la planification familiale: Directives pour actions de plaidoyer.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for Africa; Population Reference Bureau [PRB]. Bringing Information to Decisionmakers for Global Effectiveness [BRIDGE]; Academy for Educational Development [AED]. Africa's Health in 2010

    Washington, D.C., Academy for Educational Development [AED], 2008. 64 p.

    Countries throughout Africa are engaged in an important initiative to reposition family planning as a priority on their national and local agendas. Provision of family planning services in Africa is hindered by poverty, poor access to services and commodities, conflicts, poor coordination of the programmes, and dwindling donor funding. Although family planning enhances efforts to improve health and accelerate development, shifting international priorities, health sector reform, the HIV/AIDS crisis, and other factors have affected its importance in recent years. Traditional beliefs favouring high fertility, religious barriers, and lack of male involvement have weakened family planning interventions. The combination of these factors has led to low contraceptive use, high fertility rates in many countries, and high unmet needs for family planning throughout the region. Family planning advocates must take action to change this situation. Family planning, considered an essential component of primary health care and reproductive health, plays a major role in reducing maternal and newborn morbidity and mortality and transmission of HIV. It contributes to the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals and the targets of the Health-for-All Policy for the 21st century in the Africa Region: Agenda 2020. In recognition of its importance, the World Health Organisation Regional Office for Africa developed a framework (2005-014) for accelerated action to reposition family planning on national agendas and in reproductive health services, which was adopted by African ministers of health in 2004. The framework calls for increase in efforts to advocate for recognition of "the pivotal role of family planning" in achieving health and development objectives at all levels. This toolkit aims to help those working in family planning across Africa to effectively advocate for renewed emphasis on family planning to enhance the visibility, availability, and quality of family planning services for increased contraceptive use and healthy timing and spacing of births, and ultimately, improved quality of life across the region. It was developed in response to requests from several countries to assist them in accelerating their family planning advocacy efforts.
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  2. 2
    799420

    Family planning program effectiveness: report of a workshop.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]. Office of Evaluation

    Washington, D.C., USAID, 1979 Dec. 246 p. (A.I.D. Program Evaluation Report No. 1.)

    USAID sponsored a workshop in April 1979 to identify from research and experience the circumstances under which direct family planning services or developmental activities are most effective in reducing population growth in specific developing countries. Background papers prepared for the workshop on family planning efforts in Java, Colombia, and Thailand showed that family planning alone, without socioeconomic developmental additions, had lowered fertility levels significantly. However, these programs did not consider other factors which might have been responsible as well. Most of the crosscultural studies which have been done show that family planning and development activities taken together will have the greatest impact of fertility declines. Political commitment to these programs is necessary. Such commitment facilitates localized family planning activity, the most effective delivery system system. Administrative capability and socioeconomic/cultural acceptability of family planning are factors of major importance also. The workshop examined experience and made projections as to whether various countries, based on certain demographic and socioeconomic trends, will be able to achieve annual crude birth rates of 20/1000 by the year 2000. Countries were classified as certain, probably, possible, and unlikely. Flexibility of approach is urged.
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  3. 3
    803811

    World population: the present and future crisis.

    Piotrow PT

    New York, Foreign Policy Association, 1980 Oct. 80 p. (Headline Series 251)

    World population will be facing serious problems in the 1980s and 1990s as a result of 2 population trends which are presently dominating the demographic scene. The number of young people aged 15-30 in developing countries is increasing rapidly and they will be soon asserting themselves politically, economically, and socially. The 2nd trend which exists is the disparity between high population growth in the impoverished developing countries and the lower rates in the affluent industrial countries. This century's population growth has occurred primarily in the developing world and is the result of lower death rates rather than higher birthrates. The situation is attributable to demographic transition; however, the major demographic questions of how quickly birthrates will fall and how wide the gap will be before birthrates follow the classic transition remain unanswered. 3 approaches to help answer these and other demographic questions are: 1) demographic approach; 2) historical approach; and 3) observation of recent events. These various approaches are given attention in this monograph. The consequences of too rapid population growth can be seen in the low food supplies which exist leaving many in developing countries undernourished, in a decline in the quality of life, in the reduction of the potential capacity to produce what is necessary (diminished land resources, pollution of water and air), in the increases in the price of energy and natural resources, in the difficulties in acquiring employment opportunities, and in burgeoning urban growth (which puts a serious strain on housing, transportation, etc.). Family planning was adopted in various countries in the world despite government policies to counter this. While there is recognition of the need for measures to be taken to reduce fertility, the question of how to accomplish this still remains. A brief overview of developing country adoption of family policies is included. What become clear is that family planning programs do make a difference in birthrate reduction and in population growth control. An effective, extensive family planning/population program exists in the People's Republic of China; Indonesia, Colombia, Tunisia, and Mauritius are other countries with successful programs. Various socioeconomic factors influence fertility and they include: literacy and education, urbanization, improvement in the status of women, health, family or community structure, development (modernization), and even the lack of development. Population and development will be greatly affected in the future by the quality and depth of leadership. Government leadership and the private sector, donor agencies, as well as international leadership, especially that of the UNFPA, will be critical. Also included here are discussion questions and reading references for those who are interested.
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