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Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    385483

    Family planning in Latin America: The achievements of 50 years: Executive summary.

    Bertrand JT; Ward VM; Santiso-Galvez R

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, MEASURE Evaluation, 2015 Apr. [3] p. (FS-15-136; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-L-14-00004)

    This executive summary introduces the full report (See POPLINE record 337627) examining the 50-year period starting in the mid-1960s that witnessed a dramatic decline in fertility and steady increase in contraceptive use in the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region.
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  2. 2
    337633

    Family planning in El Salvador: the achievements of 50 years.

    Santiso-Galvez R; Ward VM; Bertrand JT

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, MEASURE Evaluation, 2015 Apr. [22] p. (SR-15-118C; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-L-14-00004)

    This publication is one of eight case studies that were developed as part of a broader review entitled Family Planning in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Achievements of 50 Years. As its title implies, the larger review documents and analyzes the accomplishments in the entire region since the initiation of U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) funding in the early 1960s. El Salvador has made enormous progress in terms of family planning over the past five decades. It has reduced fertility rates; it has developed a robust legal and regulatory framework for FP; it has allocated resources for procuring contraceptives for its population; it now offers information and contraceptive services to the entire population of the country with the active participation of civil society organizations, especially women’s organizations.
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  3. 3
    337632

    Family planning in Nicaragua: the achievements of 50 years.

    Santiso-Galvez R; Ward VM; Bertrand JT

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, MEASURE Evaluation, 2015 Apr. [24] p. (SR-15-118F; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-L-14-00004)

    This publication is one of eight case studies that were developed as part of a broader review entitled Family Planning in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Achievements of 50 Years. As its title implies, the larger review documents and analyzes the accomplishments in the entire region since the initiation of U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) funding in the early 1960s. Nicaragua has made significant progress in improving its macro-level primary health care indicators, reducing maternal mortality and increasing contraceptive prevalence. There has also been increased participation by the Instituto Nicaragense de Seguridad Social (INSS) in providing family planning services and commodities, thus reducing the burden on health ministry facilities. The government has shown its strong commitment to comprehensive services to improve the health of the population.
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  4. 4
    337630

    Family planning in Haiti: the achievements of 50 years.

    Ward VM; Santiso-Galvez R; Bertrand JT

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, MEASURE Evaluation, 2015 Apr. [28] p. (SR-15-118H; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-L-14-00004)

    This publication is one of eight case studies that were developed as part of a broader review entitled Family Planning in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Achievements of 50 Years. As its title implies, the larger review documents and analyzes the accomplishments in the entire region since the initiation of U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) funding in the early 1960s. The family planning movement in Haiti began in the 1960s, only a short time after family planning activities had been initiated in many other countries in the Latin American and Caribbean region. Initially, doctors and demographers worked together to encourage government policies around the issue and to begin private sector service provision programs in much the same way early family planning activities occurred elsewhere. Yet, in comparison with other countries within the region, Haiti’s progress on reproductive health has been slow.
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  5. 5
    337628

    Family planning in Colombia: the achievements of 50 years.

    Bertrand JT; Santiso-Galvez R; Ward VM

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, MEASURE Evaluation, 2015 Apr. [26] p. (SR-15-118A; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-L-14-00004)

    This publication is one of eight case studies that were developed as part of a broader review entitled Family Planning in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Achievements of 50 Years. As its title implies, the larger review documents and analyzes the accomplishments in the entire region since the initiation of U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) funding in the early 1960s. Family planning has become so deeply entrenched as a social norm in Colombia that it no longer constitutes the special area of interest that it did in the 1960s and 1970s. Nonetheless, challenges remain.
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  6. 6
    337627

    Family planning in Latin America and the Caribbean: the achievements of 50 years.

    Bertrand JT; Ward VM; Santiso-Galvez R

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, MEASURE Evaluation, 2015 Apr. [128] p. (TR-15-101; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-L-14-00004)

    This report examines the 50-year period starting in the mid-1960s that witnessed a dramatic decline in fertility and steady increase in contraceptive use in the Latin America and Caribbean (LAC) region. The current contraceptive prevalence rate (all methods) of 74 percent is among the highest of any region in the developing world. Many factors have contributed to the dramatic decline in fertility in the LAC region over the past 50 years: increased educational levels, improved economic conditions, decreased infant and child mortality, rapid urbanization, political stability, and changing cultural norms, among others. While recognizing the influence of these factors on fertility, what role did use of family planning play in fertility decline in the region? What lessons can be drawn for other developing countries committed to a development path that strengthens family planning services and improves health and living standards for their people? This report examines the specific role of family planning in accelerating fertility decline in the LAC region.
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  7. 7
    329878

    Reclaiming the ABCs: the creation and evolution of the ABC approach.

    Hardee K; Gribble J; Weber S; Manchester T; Wood M

    Washington, D.C., Population Action International, 2008. [16] p.

    This report was developed through review of the early literature on HIV/AIDS policies and programs in non-industrialized countries and of media material promoting prevention of heterosexual transmission of HIV in those countries. Material from the early days of the epidemic was difficult to obtain. Most materials were long ago archived or are in personal files in "basements". While the report focuses on the experiences of three countries, it also examines the early responses of international organizations to HIV in many other developing countries. Additional data were obtained using a snowball sampling technique through which the authors contacted people who had worked in HIV/AIDS prevention strategies. The pool of respondents is not intended to be exhaustive, but the respondents provide important voices of those working in the developing world at the beginning of the epidemic.
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  8. 8
    191276
    Peer Reviewed

    Explicating donor trends for population assistance.

    Schindlmayr T

    Population Research and Policy Review. 2004 Feb; 23(1):25-54.

    Using population assistance data, this study divides donor trends for population assistance into five distinct epochs: until the mid-1960s, the population hysteria of the 1960s and 1970s, Bucharest Conference and beyond, the 1984 Mexico City conference, and the 1990s. A number of decisive events, as well as changing views of the population problem, characterise each period and have affected the sums of population assistance from donor nations. Taking a long-term view of global population assistance, the research shows that four factors account for most of the historical funding trends from primary donors: the association between population assistance and foreign aid, the role of alarmists and doomsayers in the public debate over population issues, individuals in a position of power within donor governments, and decennial international population conferences. (author's)
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  9. 9
    090559

    International population institutions: adaptation to a changing world order.

    Crane BB

    In: Institutions for the earth: sources of effective international environmental protection, edited by Peter M. Haas, Robert O. Keohane, and Marc A. Levy. Cambridge, Massachusetts, MIT Press, 1993. 351-93. (Global Environmental Accords)

    This paper describes the political forces which have shaped the agendas and policy formulation of international population institutions (IPI) as well as their institutional characteristics and outputs. It also assesses the contributions of IPIs to national population policy formulation and implementation. During the almost three decades during which IPIs have existed, important exogenous changes have occurred in North-South and East-West relations as well as in the domestic politics of key countries involved in population issues. Although population as an issue has remained somewhat insulated from the large-scale changes in the international political and economic order, the impact of such changes on the preferences and resources of governmental and nongovernmental actors has nonetheless been evident in the decision-making forums of IPIs. There have also been changes and developments in the relevant science and technology as well as in the institutional structures and procedures of the IPIs themselves, which over time have influenced the formation of actors' preferences. IPIs are examined over the following three phases of their history: 1965-1974, the period of rapid growth in IPIs under leadership from the US and other Western donor countries; 1974-1984, a period of greater accommodation to the preferences of developing countries; and 1984-1991, a period marked by conflict over IPIs and a search for new sources of support, especially from the transnational environmental movement. A major challenge for IPIs in this recent period has been adapting to the withdrawal of the US government from participation in the UN Population Fund and the International Planned Parenthood Federation in response to domestic political pressure from individual and group lobbies against women's right to abortion.
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  10. 10
    063921

    Population Crisis Committee: twenty-five year history.

    Population Crisis Committee [PCC]

    Washington, D.C., PCC, 1990. [12] p.

    This pamphlet traces the 25-year history of the Population Crisis Committee (PCC), a private non-profit organization that seeks to increase awareness and action around the goal of reducing population growth in developing countries. For the period between 1965-1990, the report provides a timeline of changes in PCC's leadership, as well as an account of changes in the vital statistics, such as world population size and the amount of US foreign aid for family planning. In 1965, the population of the world stood at 0.308 billion people, and US family planning aid totaled $2.0 million. By 1990, the figures stand at 5.317 billion and $288.2 million, respectively. The pamphlet also describes events in which the PCC has major involvement, including: 1965 -- Congress holds hearings on how the US should respond to rapid world population growth, hearings which lead to an increase in funding of foreign aid programs; 1968 -- the Agency for International Development gives its first grant to the International Planned Parenthood Federation in the amount of $3.5 million; 1974 -- 135 countries adopt the World Population Plan of Action, and 135 countries support a resolution on food and population at the World Food Conference; 1984 -- participants at the International Conference on Population in Mexico City criticize the Reagan administration's retreat on population efforts and restrictive new abortion policies; 1989 -- a government move to eliminate funds for population aid is blocked.
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  11. 11
    041686

    The U.S. international family planning program: under siege.

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America [PPFA]

    New York, New York, PPFA, 1987. 16 p.

    This brochure published by the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, (PPFA) tells the story of the dismemberment of the U.S. international family planning policy from 1961 to 1987. Official family planning policy began in the U.S. in 1961 with Kennedy's endorsement of contraceptive research. In 1968 Congress first allotted foreign aid funds for family planning. By 1973, the tide turned with Helms' amendment to the foreign assistance act prohibiting use of funds to support abortion. In 1983, USAID cut funds for the prestigious journal International Planning Perspectives, because the agency's review board chairman objected to an article on health damage of illegal abortion and mention of legal abortion. It took a court ruling to restore funds. In the same year, the Pathfinder Fund was pressured to accept the U.S. policy articulated in 1984 as the "Mexico City Policy." This ideology states that the U.S. would no longer support any program that performs, advocates, refers or counsels women about abortion, even if those activities are legal and funded by non-U.S. sources. Next, USAID pulled support from the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). The U.S. has multiplied support for natural family planning 10-fold to $8 million, and permitted organizations to counsel clients in this method without offering conventional alternatives. In 1986, the U.S. dropped support for the U.N. Fund for Population Activities, claiming alleged Chinese compulsory abortions as a reason. The PPFA has sued for a reversal of the policy of withholding USAID funds from FPIA, the international division of PPFA. The main arguments are presented, along with a list of typical FPIA projects.
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