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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    106498

    Planning meeting to discuss development of a health facility quality review, WHO / CDR and USAID / BASICS, Geneva, May 15-19, 1995.

    Murray J

    Arlington, Virginia, Partnership for Child Health Care, 1995. [4], 9, [2] p. (BASICS Trip Report; BASICS Technical Directive: 000 HT 55 012; USAID Contract No. HRN-6006-C-00-3031-00)

    In May 1995, representatives of the World Health Organization Division of Diarrheal and Acute Respiratory Disease Control and of the US Agency for International Development's Basic Support for Institutionalizing Child Survival Project (BASICS) met in Geneva to discuss the first phase of the process of developing a methodology for collecting information on the quality of facility services in areas where integrated case management is being used. This monitoring and evaluation instrument is called Health Facility Quality Review: Case Management of Childhood Illness. The discussions revolved around the focus of activities, series of quality review activities, personnel, facilities, health workers observed and interviewed, indicators, pre-assessment for program planning, the process, materials, sampling, guidelines for developing forms, country adaptation, and format. A BASICS staff member has developed a pre-assessment tool for program planning scheduled to be used in Eritrea in June 1995. Content categories of the Health Facility Quality Review forms should include case observation, case examination, caretaker interview, health worker interview, review of records, review of facility space and furnishings, review of availability of facility equipment and supplies, review of drug supplies, review of vaccines available, review of other supplies, drug management, staffing, supervision, clinic organization, and interventions. BASICS will budget and make plans for the field test of the quality review during June-July 1995. It will oversee the pretest of forms probably in October 1995.
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  2. 2
    048973

    Draft team member contributions to mid-term evaluation of the Population and Family Planning Project (608-0171) in Morocco.

    Bouhafa M

    [Unpublished] 1988 Mar. 13 p.

    The draft team member contributions to the mid-term evaluation of the population and family planning project in Morocco examine current progress and address future needs. Increased awareness of at least 1 method of family planning was attributed to a USAID-funded project. But, problems of access, religious constraints, and lack of method-specific media campaigns need to be addressed. An increased effort to direct promotion efforts toward men is needed, as a prior immunization program showed that the husband was a key factor in encouraging mothers to bring their children to be vaccinated. Because the local health worker plays a critical role at the community level, training and support for these workers should be emphasized. Media-specific and audience-specific campaigns, by the government and private sector, should focus on the most cost-effective means of reaching the provincial level population. Donor organizations (such as UNICEF, UNFPA and USAID) should address the IEC needs identified by the central health education office, whose role and supporting functions need to be strengthened. Content of family planning materials must be method-specific, using a systematic methodology to address problems of inappropriateness, inadequate contraceptive mix, and lack of field worker training materials. Improved distribution methods for existing materials, as well as increased use of television and mass media are viable options. Using the community more effectively by encouraging leader motivation and instituting incentives could help to improve promotional and distributional activities at the provincial level. An evaluation of training needs revealed that the workshop method of training may be overemphasized, and most health workers expressed a desire for lengthened training. The private sector could be sensitized to public health issues and needs and, in conjunction with out of country technical assistance, produce effective social marketing of contraceptives within the Moroccan context. Coordination with other donors would be beneficial, with the exchange of documents and meetings between the groups.
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  3. 3
    270654

    Expanded program on immunization: western hemisphere perspective.

    de Macedo CG

    In: Protecting the World's Children, "Bellagio II" at Cartegena, Colombia, October 1985, prepared by The Task Force for Child Survival. Decatur, Georgia, The Task Force for Child Survival, 1986 Mar. 61-74.

    The Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) was initiated in accordance with a 1974 World Health Assembly resolution. The EPI was endorsed for the Americas by the Directing Council of the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) in 1977. Since its inception in 1977, the EPI program in the Americas has made considerable progress. More than 15,000 health workers have been trained in EPI workshops. A cold chain regional focal point in Cali, Columbia, has trained over 150 technicians in cold chain equipment, maintenance, and repair. Schools of public health in the region have been actively involved in EPI training. Most countries have made notable strides in improving and expanding the equipment and proceedures used in the cold chain to assure the potency of vaccines. PAHO created the EPI Revolving Fund, which has assisted countries in the region with vaccine purchases worth more than US$19 million. This fund has contributed to improved vaccine quality and the ready availability of vaccines at the country level. Since November, 1980, PAHO has collaborated with other organizations that support immunization activities, including UNICEF, USAID, Rotary International, and the Bellagio Task Force for Child Survival. An additional effort in priority countries specifically directed at polio can lead to the interruption of indigenous poliovirus transmission in the Western Hemisphere in a short period of time.
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  4. 4
    044483

    Evaluation of Village Family Planning Program, USAID Indonesia Project: 497-0327, 1983-1986.

    Bair WD; Astawa IB; Siregar KN; Sudarmadi D

    Arlington, Virginia, International Science and Technology Insitute, Population Technical Assistance Project, 1987 Jul 15. ix, 66, [41] p. (Report No. 86-099-056)

    This evaluation of the village family planning program in Indonesia is prepared for USAID, which has supported the program for 15 years, and is to complete support in 1986. It is in general a positive evaluation, prepared by interviews, and visits to 7 out of 27 Provinces, 14 out of 246 Kabupatens (Districts), and 16 Villages. Village distribution centers have increased 38%, new acceptors by 38%, continuing user levels by 57%, and overall contraceptive prevalence by 38%. Access to varieties of contraceptives, especially longer acting methods, has improved, and costs per capita have decreased. Some problems were pointed out, generating several recommendations: physical conditions of the clinics need attention; motivation by consciousness raising has not been matched by better knowledge; the surgical program needs to be expanded; self-sufficiency in cost recovery should be fostered; operations research is needed on payment for field workers and volunteers; and social marketing should be expanded. USAID should continue support for the Outer Islands. In a final list of recommendations were the suggestions that USAID assist clinical programs further, support training of field workers, do more statistical review, continue to support the IEC program, operations research on community-based distribution, and program integration.
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  5. 5
    746403

    An assessment of population conferences with particular reference to Africa.

    Weekes-Vagliani W; Hankinson R

    Paris, France, Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, 1974. (CD/SDD/288) 68 p

    Participants' views on shorter population conferences in Africa, rather than longer training workshops, are analyzed. It is concluded that the impact of such conferences could be improved by more precise planning and selection of themes and participants. So far the conferences have succeeded in affecting donor agency views rather than changing African governments' opinions. Some agencies use inappropriate strategies, overemphasizing family planning. Such plans fail to accomplish their desired end. Participants generally agree that advance information should be available and more quick follow-up work is necessary. Conferences should try to be small and short, preferably organized by the U.N. The selection of participants should include more women, fewer government officials, and fewer of the "regular" participants. Opinions regarding problems and viewpoints often differ between anglophone and francophone African communities.
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