Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 28 Results

  1. 1
    102037

    Delegates' guide to recent publications for the International Conference on Population and Development.

    Cooperating Agencies Working Group on Materials Development and Media Activities

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 1994. [6], 75 p.

    The chapters of this listing of recent publications correspond to the chapters in the Draft Programme of Action of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. Thus, publications are grouped under the headings: 1) interrelationships between population, sustained economic growth, and sustainable development; 2) gender equality, equity, and empowerment of women; 3) the family and its roles, composition, and structure; 4) population growth and structure; 5) reproductive rights, sexual and reproductive health, and family planning; 6) health, morbidity, and mortality; 7) population distribution, urbanization, and internal migration; 8) international migration; 9) population, development, and education; 10) technology, research, and development; 11) national action; 12) international cooperation; and 13) partnership with the nongovernmental sector. There are no entries that correspond to the Programme of Action chapters which present the Preamble, Principles, or Follow-up to the Conference. More than 40 organizations listed publications in this guide and agreed to provide copies free of charge to official ICPD delegates as long as supplies last. A full list of organization names, contact persons, addresses, and telephone and fax numbers is also given.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    134847

    Accomplishments in HIV / AIDS programs: highlights from the USAID HIV / AIDS Program, 1995-1997.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]

    Arlington, Virginia, Center for International Health Information, 1997 Dec. 16 p.

    This booklet presents highlights of 1995-97 activities of the US Agency for International Development's (USAID's) HIV/AIDS program. After a brief description of the current status of the pandemic, USAID's response, and its new strategy, the booklet provides a more in-depth examination of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, the highlights of USAID HIV/AIDS prevention activities during the past decade, and USAID's focus on prevention, which focuses on promoting safer sex behavior, increasing condom availability and use, and controlling sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The next section of the booklet reviews USAID's proven interventions, such as behavior change communication and research, condom social marketing, and the development of services to prevent and treat STDs. An example is then given of how the three interventions were used successfully to stem transmission in Thailand. The booklet continues by explaining how USAID has targeted its response to developing countries (where it can have a significant impact on slowing the pandemic), youth, and women, and how peer educators and community outreach activities have been used to spread the prevention message. Next, the booklet discusses how USAID has expanded its partnerships with the World Health Organization's Global Programme on AIDS, with UNAIDS, and with Japan. The final section details the new USAID strategy for the future that will continue to focus on the three aspects of prevention and will also seek to mitigate the impact of HIV/AIDS on individuals and communities. The booklet also contains case studies of various USAID-funded projects.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    119855

    Reproductive health programs supported by USAID: a progress report on implementing the Cairo Program of Action.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]. Center for Population, Health and Nutrition

    [Washington, D.C.], USAID, 1996 May. [3], 20 p.

    This report details progress made by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) in implementing the Program of Action of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. The report contains an introduction and an overview of the USAID program. USAID reproductive health programs have: 1) provided leadership for a supportive policy environment through multilateral, regional, and country-level initiatives; 2) developed innovative techniques for operations, biomedical, social science research and for evaluation; and 3) implemented reproductive health programs that promote access and quality in family planning and other reproductive health services, maternal health, women's nutrition, postabortion care, breast feeding, sexually transmitted disease and HIV prevention and control, integrated reproductive health programs, programs and services for youth, prevention of such harmful practices as female genital mutilation, male involvement, reproductive health for refugees and displaced people, and involvement of women in the design and management of programs. USAID programs to advance girls' and women's education and empowerment have forwarded women's legal and political rights, increased access to credit, and developed integrated programs for women. Priority challenges and directions for the future include: 1) determining the feasibility, costs, and effectiveness of reproductive health interventions; 2) improving understanding of reproductive health behavior; 3) continuing development of service delivery strategies; and 4) mobilizing resources for reproductive health.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    193505

    The control of AIDS.

    Sencer D

    In: Workshop on the Integration of AIDS Related Curricula into Family Planning Training Programs, Quality Hotel, Arlington, Virginia, May 10-11, 1988. Documents, distributed by The Family Planning Management Training Project [FPMT] of Management Sciences for Health [MSI] Boston, Massachusetts, Management Sciences for Health, The Family Planning Management Training Project, 1988 May. [24] p..

    Current objectives in the fight against AIDS are focused on reducing transmission. International cooperation must be guided by principles including allowing the World Health Organization and participating governments, not donors, to determine policy; work done in developing countries must achieve the same standards as in the US; relationships between health and population programs, donor agencies and governments must be characterized by cooperation, not competition; and flexibility is necessary to respond to new information. Sensitivity is essential, as the control of AIDS involves personal issues, and the diagnosis of AIDS has profound implications. Surveillance is essential to detect and control infection and to guide public policy. As few infections currently result from medical injection, interventions have focused on the difficult problem of modifying sexual behavior, with little success. Social research is essential to determine means of behavior modification and to evaluate their efficacy. A brief history of the AIDS epidemic, as well as a summary of its epidemiology are provided. Efforts to control the spread of AIDS and to care for victims are draining the resources of basic health care programs, interfering with the delivery of primary health care. The extra demands that will be placed on family planning programs, including the shift in emphasis to barrier methods will strain these programs. WHO is currently undertaking a global effort to reduce morbidity and mortality from HIV infections and prevent transmission. Its strategies focus on preventing sexual, blood borne and perinatal transmission, therapeutic drugs against HIV, vaccine development, and helping infected people, and society, deal with the illness. Other agencies which have developed programs are USAID, the DHHS and the Centers for Disease control in the US.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    045148

    USAID in Nepal.

    Weiss D

    FRONT LINES. 1987 Sep; 27(8):8-9, 11.

    The USAID's mission in Nepal is to assist development until the people can sustain their own needs: although the US contributes only 5% of donor aid, USAID coordinates donor efforts. The mission's theme is to emphasize agricultural productivity, conserve natural resources, promote the private sector and expand access to health, education and family planning. Nepal, a mountainous country between India and Tibet, has 16 million people growing at 2.5% annually, and a life expectancy of only 51 years. Only 20% of the land is arable, the Kathmandu valley and the Terai strip bordering India. Some of the objectives include getting new seed varieties into cultivation, using manure and compost, and building access roads into the rural areas. Rice and wheat yields have tripled in the '80s relative to the yields achieved in 1970. Other ongoing projects include reforestation, irrigation and watershed management. Integrated health and family planning clinics have been established so that more than 50% of the population is no more than a half day's walk from a health post. The Nepal Fertility Study of 1976 found that only 2.3% of married women were using modern contraceptives. Now the Contraceptive Retail Sales Private Company Ltd., a social marketing company started with USAID help, reports that the contraceptive use rate is now 15%. Some of the other health targets are control of malaria, smallpox, tuberculosis, leprosy, acute respiratory infections, and malnutrition. A related goal is raising the literacy rate for women from the current 12% level. General education goals are primary education teacher training and adult literacy. A few descriptive details about living on the Nepal mission are appended.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    043366

    AIDS: race against mounting odds.

    Bond C; Linden R

    SOUTH. 1987 Apr; (78):109-12.

    The prevalence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in East African countries is the topic of this news article. With the exception of Uganda, most countries' data are considered underreported. Highest estimates are 1 to 3 million cases in Africa; official counts reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) total 2561 cases. In Kenya, 250 cases and 400 infected prostitutes have been confirmed. Nigeria does not admit to any cases, officially. Uganda's officials estimate that 5-10% of urban adults are carriers. Testing is too expensive there, even of blood donors, as costs would bankrupt the health budget. USAID has contributed condoms, however. Infants born of or breast fed by infected mothers are at risk: many of babies have AIDS in Uganda, Zambia, Zaire and Rwanda. On the other hand, Rwanda has instituted a well-coordinated AIDS education campaign with the help of the Norwegian Red Cross, and Uganda, the first country to publicized AIDS, may be selected for the WHO AIDS center.
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    011113

    Honduras: country development strategy statement, FY 83.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]

    Washington, D.C., U.S. International Development Cooperation Agency, 1981 Jan. 59 p.

    This strategy statement prepared by the USAID field mission includes a brief description of the political background of aid to Honduras and an analysis of the country's economic situation including an examination of the extent and causes of poverty among different population subgroups, an overview of the economy and assessment of its ability to absorb aid, a discussion of development planning as reflected in the 5-year plan and "Immediate Action Plan" drafted in late 1980; an assessment of progress to date in development efforts and of the Honduran govenment's commitment to development objectives; and a discussion of other donors. Favorable and unfavorable factors influencing achievement of development efforts are then identified, program strategy prior to and during the current planning period are discussed, and specific issues such as the role of the private sector, human rights, the role of women, and public sector management are examined. AID's sectoral objectives and courses of action in agriculture and rural development, population, health and nutrition, education, urban and regional development, and energy are outlined, with problems, current activities, and strategy for 1983-87 identified for each sector. Efforts to improve regional cooperation and AID program efficiency are described. Proposed assistance levels and staff levels are discussed. A series of tables containing data on public sector operations, central government budget expenditures, balance of payments, and key economic indicators are included as appendices.
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    803811

    World population: the present and future crisis.

    Piotrow PT

    New York, Foreign Policy Association, 1980 Oct. 80 p. (Headline Series 251)

    World population will be facing serious problems in the 1980s and 1990s as a result of 2 population trends which are presently dominating the demographic scene. The number of young people aged 15-30 in developing countries is increasing rapidly and they will be soon asserting themselves politically, economically, and socially. The 2nd trend which exists is the disparity between high population growth in the impoverished developing countries and the lower rates in the affluent industrial countries. This century's population growth has occurred primarily in the developing world and is the result of lower death rates rather than higher birthrates. The situation is attributable to demographic transition; however, the major demographic questions of how quickly birthrates will fall and how wide the gap will be before birthrates follow the classic transition remain unanswered. 3 approaches to help answer these and other demographic questions are: 1) demographic approach; 2) historical approach; and 3) observation of recent events. These various approaches are given attention in this monograph. The consequences of too rapid population growth can be seen in the low food supplies which exist leaving many in developing countries undernourished, in a decline in the quality of life, in the reduction of the potential capacity to produce what is necessary (diminished land resources, pollution of water and air), in the increases in the price of energy and natural resources, in the difficulties in acquiring employment opportunities, and in burgeoning urban growth (which puts a serious strain on housing, transportation, etc.). Family planning was adopted in various countries in the world despite government policies to counter this. While there is recognition of the need for measures to be taken to reduce fertility, the question of how to accomplish this still remains. A brief overview of developing country adoption of family policies is included. What become clear is that family planning programs do make a difference in birthrate reduction and in population growth control. An effective, extensive family planning/population program exists in the People's Republic of China; Indonesia, Colombia, Tunisia, and Mauritius are other countries with successful programs. Various socioeconomic factors influence fertility and they include: literacy and education, urbanization, improvement in the status of women, health, family or community structure, development (modernization), and even the lack of development. Population and development will be greatly affected in the future by the quality and depth of leadership. Government leadership and the private sector, donor agencies, as well as international leadership, especially that of the UNFPA, will be critical. Also included here are discussion questions and reading references for those who are interested.
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    785097

    Comprehensive Activities Report: 1972-June 20, 1978.

    International Confederation of Midwives; United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]

    London, England, International Confederation of Midwives, 1978. 425 p.

    This document provided a summary of the activities from 1973-June 1978 of the International Congress of Midwives and of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics and International Congress of Midwives Joint Study Group. These activities were undertaken with a USAID grant. During these years, 12 Working Parties were held in various African, Asian, and Latin American countries. The purpose of the Working Parties was 1) to exchange information of the training and utilization of midwives and traditional birth attendants and 2) to develop recommendations for expanding the role of midwives and traditional birth attendants in the delivery of maternal and child care and family planning services through legislative changes, through the development of training programs, and through broadening contacts with other health organizations. The International Congress of MIdwives determined the host country for each of the Working Parties. The governments of all participating countries were invited to send 2 delegates to the Work Party and to present a country report at the meeting. This document provided a summary of the proceedings, the country reports from the particpating countries, and the conclusions and recommendations made by the participants for each of the 12 Working Parties. Follow up visits were made to participating countries by staff members of the International Congress of Midwives in order to ascertain if the recommendations were being implemented and to offer assistance, if necessary. The results of these follow up visits were also provided.
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    762466

    Bangladesh.

    Loomis SA

    Washington, D.C., U.S. Office of International Health, Division of Planning and Evaluation, 1976. 92 p. (Syncrisis: the dynamics of health, XVII)

    This article uses available statistics to analyze health conditions in Bangladesh and their impact on the country's socioeconomic development. Background information on the country is first given, after which population characteristics, health status, nutrition, national health policy and adminstration, health services and programs, population programs, environmental sanitation, health sector resources, financing of health care and donor assistance are examined. Bangladesh's 3% annual population increase is expected to increase already great population pressure and to have a negative impact on the health status of the population. Although reliable health statistics are lacking, infant mortality is estimated at 140 per 1000, 40% of all deaths occur in the 0-4 age group, and maternal mortality is high. Infectious diseases exacerbated by malnutrition are the main causes of death. 4 key factors are responsible for the general malnutrition: 1) rapidly growing population, 2) low per capita income, 3) high incidence of diarrheal diseases, and 4) dietary practices that restrict nutrient intake. Most of the population has access only to traditional health services, and medical education is hospital oriental and curative, with minimal emphasis on public health. The level of environmental sanitation is extremely low.
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    796847

    Annual budget submission, Niger FY 1979.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]

    [Unpublished] [1979]. 56 p.

    USAID has developed its program in Niger from one of emergency food aid and drought relief to one of medium term activity. The program has emphasized increased food production and small farmers. By December 1977, the supported programs will be the Niger Cereals Program, Phase 1; Niamey Department Rural Development, Phase 1; Niger Range and Livestock, Phase 1; the Niger Rural Health Program; and, INRAN Agricultural Economic Research Program. These programs represent $40 million to be spent in the next few years. The Niger Cereals Program, scheduled to complete its first phase in FY 79, represents $13 million and the Mission is submitting a $21 million (U.S. inputs) second phase, 1979-83. In both phases the Cereals program's investment amounts to $42 million over 8 years. Two programs recommended for funding are one for training and education of a rural development cadre, and one for managing irrigation in arid and semiarid climates. Regional activities under the Sahel Devleopment Program are also supported by USAID. Support for the Niger Departmetn of Water and Forestry, the Niger Rural Roads Program, and development of better watered agricultural lands in the south is recommended.
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    795648

    The International Confederation of Midwives: an overview.

    Hardy FM

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNAECOLOGY AND OBSTETRICS. 1979; 17(2):102-4.

    A brief summary of the historical development of the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) and a review of the organization's recent activities was presented. Efforts to develop an international association of midwives began in 1922. The 1st World Congress of Midwives was held in 1954 and since that time the Congress has met once every 3 years. National midwife associations from 51 countries belong to the ICM. The goals of the organization are 1) to improve the knowledge, training, and professional status of midwives; 2) to promote improved maternal and child care in member countries; and 3) to further information exchange. Since 1961 the ICM and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics have cooperated in a joint study of midwife training and practice. In 1966 the study group completed its 1st report on the status of maternal care around the world and made a number of recommendations for improving the training of midwives and for establishing uniform licensing requirements. It soon became apparent that these problems could not be dealt with on a worldwide basis, and 12 working parties in different regions were established to investigate the problem at the local level and also to make recommendation in regard to providing family planning services in the context of maternal and child health programs. Each working party has a Field Director who seeks to implement the recommendations of the group. Field Directors have also arranged seminars in reproductive health for rural health workers and especially for traditional birth attendants. The ICM also works in cooperation with the European Economic Community, WHO, IPPF, and several other international agencies. The activities of the working parties have received financial support from USAID.
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    782923

    Afghanistan: a demographic uncertainty.

    SPITLER JF; FRANK NB

    Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, September 1978. (International Research Document No. 6) 12p

    Compiling population data for Afghanistan is made difficult by the nomadic population. Estimates of their numbers range from 1-2 million people, 9-14% of the total. A 1972-73 survey of the settled population accumulated data from approximately 21,000 households and 120,000 individuals. Pregnancy and marital histories were acquired from 10,000 women. The age-specific fertility rate was 8 per woman; crude birth rate, 43/1000. Estimated life expectancy for males was 34-42 years, for females, 36-41 years. The crude death rate is 28-32/1000. Of the 10,020,099 total settled population, 5,373,249 were male, 4,646,850 were female. The Afghan Family Guidance Association opened the first family planning clinic in 1968. By 1972 there were 18 clinics in operation. When surveyed, 3% of women over 15 knew about family planning, only 1/3 of these had used a family planning method. 66% males and 90% females over 15 were ever-married. About 11% of those over 6 years were literate, 18.7% males, 2.8% females.
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    775497

    Population and development policy.

    MCGREEVEY P

    [Unpublished] 1977 Jun. 169 p.

    Population and development policy decisions must be based on accurate demographic data in order to correctly formulate priorities in budgets and expenditures. Family planning as a public policy cannot be imposed upon private citizens; it must be freely chosen. The question remains: what determines fertility in the private sector and what can government do to align policy with performance? Research and analysis is needed to develop policy in keeping with local customs, standards, and individual sensibilities. Should more money be spent on education, health care, or development? Research from poor countries is spotty and disorganized. More money is spent on reduction of infant mortality than on family planning. Fertility control is still a controversial subject. Funds supplied for population and health are barely matched by many developing countries whose priorities lean toward agriculture and nutrition. In Haiti the 5-year development plan ignores the interactions between population growth and economic development. If the current level of fertility continues, it will act as a deterrent to development. A population impact analysis of El Salvador examines the effect AID policies and programs have on fertility control. Implementation of a policy in its first stages is described for Guatemala. Family models and global models show touchpoints where public policy might interface with private practice. Rural development implies increased production, equal opportunities, and a low fertility rate. All 3 are interrelated and affected by demographic events. Rising incomes, below a threshold level, has increased the fertility rate among the very poor.
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    766049

    Country paper-Nepal.

    Nepal. National Family Planning Project

    In: Inter-governmental Coordinating Committee (IGCC) and The Population Commission of the Philippines. Financial management of population/family planning programmes. (A Report of the IGCC Regional Workshop/Seminar on the Financial Management of Population/Family Planning Programmes, Manila, Philippines, March 15-17, 1976). Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, IGCC, [1976]. 132-8.

    The population of Nepal has nearly doubled in the years 1941-1971, from more than 6 million to almost 12 million. This equals a growth rate of 2.07% annually. The population density per square kilometer is 81 and the average family size is 5.5. Based on past growth rate trends, population is estimated to be 16 million by 1986. The seriousness of the population problem is heightened by the prevailing early marriage system among the rural population and the very low level of literacy in the country. Family planning services have been provided by the private sector, in the form of Family Planning Association of Nepal, and by the government since 1968. The organizational set-up of the Family Planning and Maternal and Child Health Project of the government is diagrammed. This program provides free services at 265 clinics throughout the country. Special attention is given to prenatal, postnatal, immunization, and nutrition education care to combat the extremely high infant mortality rate in Nepal. Charts present family planning and maternal and child health achievements in the last several years. Funding and financial management are discussed. Foreign assistance is badly needed by the program.
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    753837

    Indonesia (Family planning).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, February 1975. 9 p.

    An overview of the demographic and family planning situation in Indonesia reveals an active movement which began with the 1957 founding of the Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA). In 1968, the government announced its support of family planning. The Government Family Planning Coordinating Body (BKKBN) coordinates the components of the national program, of which IPPA is one. Most of IPPA's clinics have been turned over to the government for operation, but the organization has plans to establish 14 self-supporting Maternity and Family Planning Clinics throughout Indonesia. Much of IPPA's work in information and education, training, and research and evaluation is also linked with the government program. 16 other organizations also aid Indonesia's family planning program.
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    753836

    The Gambia (Family planning).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, January 1975. 6 p.

    According to 1973 figures, the total population of Gambia is 494,279 and the population growth rate is 4.7%. In 1967 infant mortality was estimated at 122/1000 in Banjul and 500/1000 in rural areas where health services are extremely limited. In 1970 there was 1 hospital in Banjul, 9 rural health centers, 24 dispensaries, and 34 subdispensaries. An increasing demand for abortion, particularly in the Banjul-Kombo-St. Ma ry area, has been reported. Family planning services are provided by the Family Planning Association of Gambia (FPAG), established in 1969, at its 5 clinics. Additionally, a number of health centers are visited by the FPAG. Efforts are now being taken to persuade the government to adopt a population policy and a plan for integrating family planning services into the national health services program. For the 1st half of 1974 Association figures show 791 new acceptors of contraceptive methods, 711 continuing acceptors, and 1442 total visits to the FPAG clinics. Regarding information and education, the FPAG is presently working among both youth and various groups of rural extension personnel. In 1974 the intention had been to increase the motivational literature in 2 of the local languages and to begin the publication of motivational literature in other local languages. In 1975 the Informati on and Education Department will cooperate with the fieldwork cadre in order to receive program feedback. Consequently, fieldworkers will be more actively involved in the preparation of suitable family planning materials.
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    745602

    Republic of Korea (Family planning).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, February 1974. 10 p.

    The Planned Parenthood Federation of Korea (PPFK) was founded in 196 1 to act as a pressure group to persuade the government to set up a family planning program. In 1962 the Korean government became 1 of the 1st in the world with such an official program. PPFK has a permanent staff of 62 at headquarters and 135 at branch offices to implement the information/education program. It was formerly responsible for the training for the government effort and it continues to initiate research and pilot projects. It also indirectly supports the clincs at Seoul National University and Yonsei University Medical colleges, runs 14 demonstration clincs, and has a mobile team unit in Taegi City and surrounding rural areas. Since 1968 it has organized "Mothers' Classes" which have been integrated into the rural community development program. Special projects include a "Stop at 2" campaign which the government officially adopted. The "Two Child Family" club was started in Seoul in 1971 and is expanding. UNFPA is funding an information, education, and communication campaign that will explore various uses of mass media. Pilot telephone consultation was begun in 1973. Vasectomy information is being given to the Homeland Reserve Force, an education project has been started for civil servants, and student newspapers are being used to reach the student population. PPFK has national responsib ility for clinical trials of new contraceptives. Tests on Minovlar ED continue and the results of Neovlar trials are being analyzed. Details of the government organizations are given. Research being carried on at various universities and in other agencies is also capsuled.
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    735203

    Indonesia (Family planning).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, June 1973. 10 p.

    The Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA) was founded in 1957 and pioneered family planning services. It made little headway duri ng the pronatalist Sukarno regime, but in 1967 the present government announced an intensive family planning program and the IPPA was named as an implementing unit in 1971. 2 primary roles now are the training activities for fieldworkers and the development of community education and motivation programs. This complements the national mass media program. In 1970 the government took over all clinics except those in the Outer Islands (the islands outside Java, Bali, and Madura). The IPPA runs 150 clinics in the Outer Islands, is responsible for all supplies and maintenance, and has a number of model clinics in Java and Bali. The Community Education program has 8 components: speakers bureau, family planning clubs, mobile audiovisual units, exhibitions, tr aditional media, special events, local mass media support, and evaluatio n. In 1971 the 'ippa trained 2951 people; in 1972 this was increased by 25%. In 1973 the target is training 3000 fieldworkers with 16 centers for training and 16 field demonstration areas. An agreement with the U.N. Fund for Population Activities/International Development Association (UNFPA/IDA) will provide for building, equipping, and staffing. The research and evaluation function is also expanding to complement government activities. The government program aims to train 20,250 medical and paramedical personnel over 5 years and medical schools have incorporated the teaching of population and family planning. Government allowances are being curtailed for all children over 3 for government workers. An active clinic program aims to set up 1200 fully equipped and 1250 moderately equipped facilities by 1973. An active media campaign has been launched and for the 1st time in the population field the UNFPA and the IDA are helping to finance a project to expand a family planning program and broaden its activities. This su pport will provide for physical facilities, technical assistance, training, motivation, evaluation, research, and population education.
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    745597

    Laos (Family Planning)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, February 1974. 6 p.

    Laos has been so torn by war and continuing waves of refugees that i t has been difficult to provide basic medical services to the population . In 1969 Laos had 53 medical doctors, 40 of whom were foreign instructors at the School of Medicine, 676 practical nurses, and 400 trained midwives. Before 1971 the government was opposed to family planning. A study commission in that year, however, examined population growth problems and recommended support for family planning. The voluntary association had been formed in 1966 and had sent representatives to international workshops. After the change in government attitude, the association has actively acted to distribute family planning supplies to villages, train midwives as motivators, and give additional training to public health center heads, home economists, medical assistants, and refugee village heads. The governmental emphasis is on better spacing of births rather than limitation. It took over operation of 7 association clinics in 1973 and now helps provide contraceptive services. The association still has 5 fixed and 6 mobile clinics. A refugee pilot program which opened in 1971 now has a permanent building and a full-time rural midwife. The association also stresses influencing opinion leaders through lecture forums, pamphlets, radio commercials, and film shows. Information and Education teams were formed to conduct 2-3 day seminar-lectures in other provinces to diverse groups like village headmen, town influentials, teachers, and other leaders. Many foreign groups have provided assistance, supplies, training, and other aid. WHO is helping with the integration of family planning into the nursing and midwifery curricula in the schools of Laos.
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    725737

    Sierra Leone (Family planning).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, June 1972. 5 p

    All the demographic statistics and the cultural, economic, and geogr aphical sttuation of Sierra Leone are presented. The Planned Parenthood Association of Sierra Leone (PPASL) was founded in 1960. There is no anticontraceptive legislation in the country but the attitude of the government toward family planning is still tentative. Current educational, fieldwork, clinic operations, and fund raising projects are summarized. Current personneof PPASL are given. New acceptors choose t he IUD generally, with more educated acceptors favoring the pill or spermicides. Other services provided by PPASL are mentioned. Sources of funding, including international organizations, are listed.
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    725736

    Sarawak (Family planning).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, June 1972. 4 p

    All the demographic statistics and the cultural, economic, and geogr aphical situation of Sarawak, part of the Malaysia Federation, are presented. The history of interest in family planning and the current personnel of the Sarawak Family Planning Association (FPA) are presented. The FPA is assisted with clinics, grants, and land from the government. Family planning services are provided by the FPA at 8 urban and 57 rural clinics. Orals are the overwhelming favorite of acceptors. Current educational and training activities are summarized. International organizations providing assistance for the family planning program are mentioned.
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    725732

    Republic of Vietnam (Family planning).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, May 1972. 5 p

    All the demographic statistics and the cultural, economic, and geogr aphical situation of the Republic of Vietnam are presented. The history of interest in family planning and the current personnel of the Vietnamese Association for the Protection of Family Happiness are presented. Conservative Catholic opinion considers family planning activity controversial. Contraception is widely practiced by those who can afford to pay for it and the practice is considered private, not open to government interference. The government is showing increasing i nterest in the question of population. Current educational, clinic, training, and research activities are summarized. International organizations providing aid are enumerated.
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    725719

    Hong Kong (Family planning).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, September 1972. 7 p

    Hong Kong, with 3858 people/sq km, is 1 of the world's most densely populated areas. Family planning was introduced in 1936 by the Hong Kong Eugenics League and 5 clinics were operating by 1940. The Family Planning Association (FPA) was formed in 1950 and was a founder member of IPPF in 1952. Interest in family planning increased as massive immigration from China added to overcrowding. The government supports FPA (in 1972 the grant was U.S.$254,545) and houses 80% of the FPA clinics in government properties. At present there are 46 female clinics providing 189 sessions per week and 2 male clinics operating eac h week. The decline from 54 to 48 clinics is due to the new emphasis on full-time rather than part-time clinics. In 1971 there were 347,894 attenders, an increase of 18% over 1970, and 31,898 new acceptors, an increase of 4%. There has been continued increase in the number of patients requesting oral contraceptives (70.6% in 1971). The IUD began to decline after bad publicity surrounded a large number of loops which had broken in the uterus; in 1971 only 6% of acceptors asked for IUDs. Condoms account for 11.5% and injectables, 3.6%. FPA offers subfertility and marriage guidance services and is extending its Papanicolaou smear service. An active media campaign, exhibitions, and seminars are conducted. Until 1967 fieldwork consisted of random home visits. An efficiency study led to concentration on maternal and child health clinics, postnatal clinics, and follow-up home visits. Home visi ts are still made on request. A number of international trials for various contraceptives have been run in Hong Kong. Many church and international organizations are helping to finance family planning activities, both through FPA and through their own organizations.
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    701730

    Ghana.

    Gaisie SK; Jones SB

    Country Profiles. 1970 Oct; 1-12.

    The report gives population trends and the status of family planning projects in Ghana. A general background account of Ghana's demographics (size and growth patterns, redistribution trends, urban/rural distribution, religious and ethnic composition, economic status, literacy, future trends, and social/economic groups and attitudes) is discussed. The relationships of national income, size and quality of the labor force, agricultural labor and productivity, public education, and health to the population's growth is summarized. Development of a population policy is described along with major recommendations for a national policy. The organization and structure of the national family planning program is set forth along with a table of "planning targets for increasing the use of contraceptives". Current practices of birth control are reviewed; supportive state and international agencies' roles are discussed; a prognosis of population planning efforts concludes the report.
    Add to my documents.

Pages