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  1. 1
    102037

    Delegates' guide to recent publications for the International Conference on Population and Development.

    Cooperating Agencies Working Group on Materials Development and Media Activities

    Baltimore, Maryland, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Center for Communication Programs, 1994. [6], 75 p.

    The chapters of this listing of recent publications correspond to the chapters in the Draft Programme of Action of the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. Thus, publications are grouped under the headings: 1) interrelationships between population, sustained economic growth, and sustainable development; 2) gender equality, equity, and empowerment of women; 3) the family and its roles, composition, and structure; 4) population growth and structure; 5) reproductive rights, sexual and reproductive health, and family planning; 6) health, morbidity, and mortality; 7) population distribution, urbanization, and internal migration; 8) international migration; 9) population, development, and education; 10) technology, research, and development; 11) national action; 12) international cooperation; and 13) partnership with the nongovernmental sector. There are no entries that correspond to the Programme of Action chapters which present the Preamble, Principles, or Follow-up to the Conference. More than 40 organizations listed publications in this guide and agreed to provide copies free of charge to official ICPD delegates as long as supplies last. A full list of organization names, contact persons, addresses, and telephone and fax numbers is also given.
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  2. 2
    134847

    Accomplishments in HIV / AIDS programs: highlights from the USAID HIV / AIDS Program, 1995-1997.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]

    Arlington, Virginia, Center for International Health Information, 1997 Dec. 16 p.

    This booklet presents highlights of 1995-97 activities of the US Agency for International Development's (USAID's) HIV/AIDS program. After a brief description of the current status of the pandemic, USAID's response, and its new strategy, the booklet provides a more in-depth examination of the HIV/AIDS pandemic, the highlights of USAID HIV/AIDS prevention activities during the past decade, and USAID's focus on prevention, which focuses on promoting safer sex behavior, increasing condom availability and use, and controlling sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The next section of the booklet reviews USAID's proven interventions, such as behavior change communication and research, condom social marketing, and the development of services to prevent and treat STDs. An example is then given of how the three interventions were used successfully to stem transmission in Thailand. The booklet continues by explaining how USAID has targeted its response to developing countries (where it can have a significant impact on slowing the pandemic), youth, and women, and how peer educators and community outreach activities have been used to spread the prevention message. Next, the booklet discusses how USAID has expanded its partnerships with the World Health Organization's Global Programme on AIDS, with UNAIDS, and with Japan. The final section details the new USAID strategy for the future that will continue to focus on the three aspects of prevention and will also seek to mitigate the impact of HIV/AIDS on individuals and communities. The booklet also contains case studies of various USAID-funded projects.
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  3. 3
    134896

    Report from the Meeting on Changing Communication Strategies for Reproductive Health and Rights, December 10-11, 1997, Washington, D.C.

    Working Group on Reproductive Health and Family Planning

    [New York, New York, Population Council, Health and Development Policy Project, [1998]. v, 85 p.

    The Working Group on Reproductive Health and Family Planning (FP) was convened by the Health and Development Policy Project and the Population Council in 1994 to help make US-supported international FP programs consistent with the Plan of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development. This document reports on a 1997 Working Group meeting on "Changing Communication Strategies for Reproductive Health and Rights." The first part of the report reviews changing communication strategies and offers a brief history of health communication. Part 2 presents results of a panel discussion about client-provider interactions, community participation, and the interface of client satisfaction and quality of health care. The third part summarizes a panel discussion on community mobilization and reproductive rights education strategies, including communication strategies for maternal health and rights in Bolivia; sex education in Latin America; IEC (information, education, communication), FP, and sexually transmitted diseases interventions; and a methodology for incorporating gender issues into community AIDS prevention programs. Part 4 contains papers from a panel on the mass media and social marketing that consider how to use the media as a tool for social change, a communication strategy to increase male involvement in FP in Zimbabwe, marketing the female condom in Zimbabwe, and the empowerment of women and youth in Nicaragua. The final sections present donors' perspectives, a summary of themes covered in technical group discussions, and appendices.
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  4. 4
    070613

    Strengthening of the Niger EPI, USAID / Niamey, January 5 - February 2, 1987.

    Claquin P; Triquet JP

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow, Inc. [JSI], Resources for Child Health Project [REACH], 1987. [50] p. (USAID Contract No. DPE-5927-C-00-5068-00)

    In 1987, consultants went to Niger to prepare the plan of operations for the national Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI). US$ 6 million from the World Bank Health Project and around US$ 5 million from the UNICEF EPI Project were available for EPI activities. Low vaccination coverage prevailed outside Niamey. Outbreaks of diseases that EPI can prevent continued to kill children. The cold chain was not maintained, especially at the periphery. Mobile teams continued to use inadequate strategies. Record keeping did not exist. The central level did not supervise the periphery. EPI staff at departmental and division levels did not have current written guidelines. Not only did poor working communications exist between the central level and the periphery, but also between the EPI Director and the other Minister of Health divisions, between WHO and UNICEF, and between both UN agencies and EPI. The EPI Director did have a good relationship with the USAID office, however. No one took inventory of EPI resources or monitored temperatures at any point in the cold chain. Even though the World Bank Health Project intended to five EPI 50 ped-o-jets, 46% of the existing 88 ped-o-jets were in disrepair and no one knew how to repair and maintain them. Thus EPI should not routinely use ped-o-jets. The consultants recommended that USAID stay involved with EPI in Niger since the EPI Director considered it an acceptable partner. EPI staff at each level should take a detailed inventory of all material resources. Effective and regular supervision should occur at the central, regional, and peripheral levels. A health worker needs to record the temperature of the refrigerator twice a day. Technical grounds should determine the standardization and selection of all equipment. Someone should maintain an adequate supply of spare parts and technicians should undergo training in maintenance.
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  5. 5
    065789

    Plan of action for the control of diarrheal diseases in the region of the Americas. Interagency Coordinating Committee for the Control of Diarrheal Diseases (ICC/CDD). Plan de accion para el control de las enfermedades diarreicas en la region de las Americas.

    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]; UNICEF; United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]

    [Unpublished] [1990]. [3], 32, [3], 32 p.

    The American made remarkable strides in reducing diarrheal mortality and morbidity during the 1980s. All of the nations here had in place a control of diarrheal diseases (CDD) program or CDD activities by early 1989. 1 goal for CDD projects in the region included ORS availability to 80% of all children <5 years old. 17 nations even produced their own oral rehydration solution (ORS). This contributed to the fact that more countries proportionally produced ORS in the Americas than in any other region. Still diarrhea continued to be 1 of the 3 leading causes of death and illness in children <5 years old in most countries in the Americas. Accordingly an Interagency Coordinating Committee (ICC/CDD) Task Force composed of representatives from PAHO, UNICEF, and USAID formed in 1989 to develop a framework for the region and countries to follow in designing plans of action. Each country in the Americas should foster effective cooperation among all organizations involved in CDD activities within that country. If an interagency process, e.g., child survival programs, already exists, the country should include the CDD program into it. National ICC/CDDs should define policies and prepare the plan of action incorporating both technical and financial support from the public and private sectors. They must also coordinate CDD training activities, especially those emphasizing correct case management. Further they should concur on communication projects and coordinate message development and relations with the mass media. These committees must also recognize problems, develop solutions, foster research, and amend national CDD programs as needed. PAHO is the technical secretariat for the regional ICC/CDD which works to foster optimum cooperation among PAHO, UNICEF, and USAID thereby providing maximum assistance to these programs.
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  6. 6
    272167

    Too many Nigerians?

    Sobo E

    WEST AFRICA. 1990 May 28-Jun 3; (3796):872-3.

    There were big budget increases for international population control programs under Reagan. The expenditures went unnoticed by the US press because Reagan kept them decentralized. In some cases, programs to control family size have been purposely hidden from the people for whom they are intended. An example is, a program designed at The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, the Population Communication Services Project. The US $42 million campaign was designed to provide communications to increase the "level of requests for services" at birth control clinics--primarily in Africa. Outreach activities were also to be done. It also covered smaller programs, such as "Enter-Educate," which developed and promoted songs that would change attitudes and behavior to family planning and disguised them as popular music. A record was made in Mexico in 1986. A similar production took place in the Philippines 2 years later. A 3rd recording was produced by a Nigerian. This album is made up of King Sunny Ade's usual juju music, but contains 2 songs in English in a very different musical style. The cost was US $350,000. During 1987, the US Agency for International Development (USAID) spent US $67 million to promote population control in Nigeria alone. USAID officials did not know exactly how the US $350,000 was spent. In July, 1988 a seminar in Oyo State for Nigerian hospital personnel and the armed forces was co-sponsored by Johns Hopkins and the Pathfinder Fund. Pathfinder, based near Boston, is involved in many programs for promotion of the US population agenda: 1) revising source documents on Islam and family planning 2) a series of pro-contraceptive manuals for Islamic scholars and teachers. The World Bank has been trying to see that Africa brings down its birth rate. The US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) has also been involved in population control.
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  7. 7
    048973

    Draft team member contributions to mid-term evaluation of the Population and Family Planning Project (608-0171) in Morocco.

    Bouhafa M

    [Unpublished] 1988 Mar. 13 p.

    The draft team member contributions to the mid-term evaluation of the population and family planning project in Morocco examine current progress and address future needs. Increased awareness of at least 1 method of family planning was attributed to a USAID-funded project. But, problems of access, religious constraints, and lack of method-specific media campaigns need to be addressed. An increased effort to direct promotion efforts toward men is needed, as a prior immunization program showed that the husband was a key factor in encouraging mothers to bring their children to be vaccinated. Because the local health worker plays a critical role at the community level, training and support for these workers should be emphasized. Media-specific and audience-specific campaigns, by the government and private sector, should focus on the most cost-effective means of reaching the provincial level population. Donor organizations (such as UNICEF, UNFPA and USAID) should address the IEC needs identified by the central health education office, whose role and supporting functions need to be strengthened. Content of family planning materials must be method-specific, using a systematic methodology to address problems of inappropriateness, inadequate contraceptive mix, and lack of field worker training materials. Improved distribution methods for existing materials, as well as increased use of television and mass media are viable options. Using the community more effectively by encouraging leader motivation and instituting incentives could help to improve promotional and distributional activities at the provincial level. An evaluation of training needs revealed that the workshop method of training may be overemphasized, and most health workers expressed a desire for lengthened training. The private sector could be sensitized to public health issues and needs and, in conjunction with out of country technical assistance, produce effective social marketing of contraceptives within the Moroccan context. Coordination with other donors would be beneficial, with the exchange of documents and meetings between the groups.
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  8. 8
    047734

    Making do with less: the 1990 round of censuses in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Crowley JG; Hardee-Cleaveland K

    [Unpublished] 1988. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Population Association of America, New Orleans, Louisiana, April 21-23, 1988. [3], 23, [3] p.

    For sub-Saharan countries, population censuses are crucial in obtaining data about local areas, sociodemographic characteristics, and input for development and policy making. Most sub-Saharan countries cannot afford to fund censuses, and external assistance has been provided by UNFPA, the US, the United Kingdom, and France. The World Bank has recently become involved in supporting census work, and coordination between all these groups is critical. 5 critical areas for making effective use of scarce resources are: country commitment; improved donor coordination; management and planning; institutionalization of census capabilities; and improvement of production, dissemination, and use of census data. Country commitment is affected by fund shortages, and political sensitivities. Census work should depend on agricultural seasons, the school year, and migratory movements. Donor coordination in the areas of funding, data analysis, and technical assistance is important. Planning for future censuses should begin 2-3 years before the actual census date, and management of the census should include short-term training and technical assistance from donor countries. The institutionalization of census activities should address the weakest link in census work--data processing. Lengthy delays in processing data because of nonstandardized equipment, limited access, and lack of skilled personnel have hampered census efforts. A fully configured microcomputer system would also address this problem. Publication and dissemination of census data, sometimes delayed as much as 8 years, could be improved by the use of timely microcomputer reports of preliminary results. Attention to these 5 key areas will improve the 1990 round of censuses, and efficiently use the limited resources available.
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  9. 9
    034927

    Private sector family planning.

    Krystall E

    Populi. 1985; 12(3):34-9.

    The US Agency for International Development (USAID) in consultation with the government of Kenya agreed in 1983 to prepare a demonstration family planning project, which would assist the private sector as well as other major nongovernment providers of health services to upgrade their health services, train and augment their nursing and other medical staff, provide family planning equipment and free contraceptives, and establish these health facilities as full-time family planning service delivery points. The Family Planning Private Sector Program (FPPS) will assist 30 private sector firms, "parastatal" organizations, and other private and nongovernment organizations that already provide health services to their workers, their dependents, and in many cases the surrounding communities to upgrade their services and add a full-time family planning facility. As some of the firms or organizations have multiple outlets, the program will create 50 or more new family planning delivery points throughout Kenya, thereby also relieving some of the pressure on government facilities. The FPPS sub-projects are to recruit at least 30,000 new acceptors. FPPS has added a guideline that at least 60% of these new acceptors be retained in the program for at least a period of 2 years. The FPPS program has received an enthusiastic reception from employers, the unions, and nongovernment organizations such as the Protestant Church Medical Association and the Seventh Day Adventists. The FPPS team can provide projects with a variety of services and funds for family planning related equipment, supplies, and activities. These include assistance with project design, training existing medical staff in family planning service delivery, the collection of baseline information, and the provision of funds for equipping family planning clinics. The government has encouraged FPPS to be innovative and to introduce family planning services into as wide a variety of health services as possible. As presently designed, the FPPS program is primarily a service delivery program but is beginning to play an increasingly dynamic role in information and education activities about family planning. From the start, the participating projects demanded assistance in spreading the family planning message to the workers, their families, and the community. It is evident that the program has stimulated management, clinic staff, and workers and has generated competition between projects to reach and exceed their targets of both new acceptors and high continuation rates.
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  10. 10
    031538

    SOMARC briefing book.

    Futures Group. Social Marketing for Change [SOMARC]

    Washington, D.C., SOMARC, [1985]. [58] p.

    This document contains briefing materials for the participants of an upcoming meeting of the advisory council and working groups of Social Marketing for Change (SOMARC), an organizational network, funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and composed of 5 firms which work together in helping agencies, organizations, and governments develop contraceptive social marketing programs. Social marketing is the use of commercial marketing techniques and management procedures to promote social change. The briefing materials include 3 background and 18 issue papers. The background papers provide brief summaries of USAID's population activities and of the history of social marketing programs, an overview of USAID sponsored contraceptive social marketing programs in 14 countries and of 3 major non-USAID programs, and a listing of the skills and resources needed to develop effective contraceptive social marketing programs. The issue papers provide a focus for the discussion sessions which are scheduled for SOMARC's working groups on marketing communication, management, and research. USAID's objective is to promote the development of family planning programs which are completely voluntary and which increase the reproductive freedom of couples. Contraceptive social marketing programs are consistent with this objective. USAID provides direct funding for family planning programs as well as commodity, technical, and training support. USAID's involvement in social marketing began in 1971, and USAID is currently sponsoring programs in Jamaica, Bangladesh, Nepal, El Salvador, Egypt, Honduras, Ecuador, the Caribbean Region, Costa Rica, Guatemala, and Peru. In the past, USAID provided support for programs in Mexico, Tunisia, and Ghana. The Mexican project is now functioning without USAID support, and the projects in Tunisia and Ghana are no longer operating. Major non-USAID contraceptive social marketing programs operate in India, Sri Lanka, and Colombia. These programs received only limited technical support from USAID. To ensure the success of social marketing programs, social marketers must have access to the knowledge and skills of commercial marketers in the areas of management, analysis and planning, communications, and research. Social marketers must also have expertise in social development and social research. In reference to the issue papers, the working groups and the advisory council were asked to develop suggestions for 1) overcoming social marketing program management problems, 2) motivating health professionals toward greater involvement in social marketing programs, 3) improving the media planning component of the programs, 4) improving management stability and training for management personnel, and 5) improving program evaluation. Areas addressed by the issue papers were 1) whether social marketing programs should be involved in creating a demand for contraceptives or only in meeting the existing demand, 2) the development of a methodology for assessing why some programs fail and others succeed, 3) the feasibility of using anthropological and questionnaire modules for conducting social marketing research, 4) techniques for overcoming the high level of nonsampling error characteristic of survey data collected in developing countries, 5) techniques for identifying contraceptive price elasticity, 6) the feasibility of using content analysis in social marketing communications, 7) the applicability of global marketing strategies for social marketing, and 8) how to select an an appropriate advertising agency to publicize social marketing programs.
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  11. 11
    782558

    Changing approaches to population problems.

    Wolfson M

    Paris, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Development Centre, 1978. 193 p. (Development Centre Studies)

    The World Population Conference which took place in Bucharest in 1974 witnessed many debates and rhetorical controversies over the role of family planning programs in Third World countries and their relation to development. This report is the result of a collaborative study realized by the Development Centre and the World Bank which investigates how developing countries, as well as aid agencies, are thinking about population problems and, as a consequence, about population assistance in the "post-Bucharest era." The report includes detailed surveys of 12 developing countries, representing Asia, Africa, Latin America and the Middle East. It also interviews and reports on the activities of a large number of population assistance agencies. The roles of international organizations such as the UNFPA, the UN population division and the World Bank itself are assessed in terms of their impact on national development through population control efforts. Reviews of assistance provided to developing nations by nongovernmental agencies, private foundations and developed nations are also presented. Each country paper presented provides an overview of the country's demographic characteristics; a summary of history of population policies, pre- and post-Bucharest era; an overview of population strategies past and present, their integration with other-sector activities; family planning program administration; and a survey of all forms of population assistance available and utilized by the country. Macro-level analyses of changes in family planning assistance by organizations since Bucharest, as well as micro-level, country-specific studies of how each nation has assimilated these changes and has developed a specific population policy are provided.
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  12. 12
    258315

    Report on A.I.D.'s population program assistance in relation to envisaged worldwide needs.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]

    Unpublished, Nov. 1970. 28 p. plus tables

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  13. 13
    783212

    Multi-year population strategy--Arab Republic of Egypt.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]

    Egypt, USAID. 1978 March; 82.

    A review of Egypt's population/family planning policy and assessment of the current population problem is included in a multi-year population strategy for USAID in Egypt, which also comprises: 1) consideration of the major contraints to expanded practice of family size limitation; 2) assessment of the Egyptian government's commitment to fertility control; 3) suggestions for strengthening the Egyptian program and comment on possible donor roles; and 4) a recommended U.S. strategy and comment on the implications of the recommendations. The text of the review includes: 1) demographic goals and factors; 2) assessment of current population efforts; 2) proposed approaches and action for fertility reduction in Egypt; and 4) implication for U.S. population assistance. Based on analysis of Egyptian population program efforts, the following approaches are considered essential to a successful program of fertility reduction: 1) effective management and delivery of family planning services; 4) an Egyptian population educated, motivated and participating in reducing family size; 5) close donor coordination; and 6) emphasis on the role of women.
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  14. 14
    781095

    CBFPS (Community-based Family Planning Services) in Thailand: a community-based approach to family planning.

    BURINTRATIKUL S; SAMANIEGO MC

    Essex, Connecticut, International Council for Educational Development, 1978. (A project to help practitioners help the rural poor, case study no. 6) 91 p

    This report and case study of the Community-Based Family Planning Service (CBFPS) in Thailand describes and evaluates the program in order to provide useful operational lessons for concerned national and international agencies. CBFPS has demonstrated the special role a private organization can play not only in providing family planning services, but in helping to pioneer a more integrated approach to rural development. The significant achievement of CBFPS is that it has overcome the familiar barriers of geographical access to family planning information and contraceptive supplies by making these available in the village community itself. The report gives detailed information on the history and development of the CBFPS, its current operation and organization, financial resources, and overall impact. Several important lessons were learned from the project: 1) the successful development of a project depends on a strong and dynamic leader; 2) cooperation between the public and private sectors is essential; 3) the success of a project depends primarily on the effectiveness of community-based activities; 4) planning and monitoring activities represent significant ingredients of project effectiveness; 5) a successful project needs a sense of commitment among its staff; 6) it is imperative that a project maintain good public relations; 7) the use of family planning strategy in introducing self-supporting development programs can be very effective; 8) manning of volunteer workers is crucial to project success; and 9) aside from acceptor recruitment in the short run, the primary purpose of education in more profound matterns such as childbearing, womens'roles in the family, and family life should also be kept in mind. The key to success lies in continuity of communication and education.
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  15. 15
    774528

    Conferences and meetings as a communication technique.

    WEBSTER RL

    Honolulu, Hawaii, East-West Communication Institute, May 1977. (A synthesis of Population Communication Experience Paper No. 3) 84 p

    The extent to which conferences and meetings have been involved in the development of the meetings have been involved in the development of the population/family planning field and particularly in the development of communication as a component of population/family planning programs is examined. Significant international, regional, and problem-oriented meetings that have taken place during the last decade are reviewed in terms of their purpose, subject matter, sponsorship, and impact on world awareness and national policies and programs. Topics covered include the roles of various agencies and organizations which organize fund conferences related to population communication, conferences with and for the mass media, conferences and meetings as components of specific projects, and the development of meetings on the national level. A detailed case study of a conference is presented to show how conferences are planned, conducted, and evaluated, and to identify desirable and undesirable aspects of conference management. An overall look at conferences and identification of their positive elements and their major shortcomings, by presenting guidelines for conference planners and managers, and by assessing trends and alternatives for population/family planning conferences in the future, is included.(AUTHORS', MODIFIED)
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  16. 16
    773446

    Desexing birth control.

    STYCOS JM

    Family Planning Perspectives. November-December 1977; 9(6):286-292.

    When Margaret Sanger initiated the American birth control movement in the early twentieth century, she stressed female and sexual liberation. Victorian views on morality have since combined with the compromises necessitated to achieve legitimacy for the movement to lead to a desexualization of the birth control movement. The movement's communication now concentrates on reproduction and ignores sex; it emphasizes family planning and population control but does not mention sexual pleasure. Taboos against publicity concerning contraceptives are more powerful even than laws restricting the sale or distribution of contraceptives themselves in many countries. The movement must recover its earlier revolutionary stance.
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  17. 17
    766049

    Country paper-Nepal.

    Nepal. National Family Planning Project

    In: Inter-governmental Coordinating Committee (IGCC) and The Population Commission of the Philippines. Financial management of population/family planning programmes. (A Report of the IGCC Regional Workshop/Seminar on the Financial Management of Population/Family Planning Programmes, Manila, Philippines, March 15-17, 1976). Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, IGCC, [1976]. 132-8.

    The population of Nepal has nearly doubled in the years 1941-1971, from more than 6 million to almost 12 million. This equals a growth rate of 2.07% annually. The population density per square kilometer is 81 and the average family size is 5.5. Based on past growth rate trends, population is estimated to be 16 million by 1986. The seriousness of the population problem is heightened by the prevailing early marriage system among the rural population and the very low level of literacy in the country. Family planning services have been provided by the private sector, in the form of Family Planning Association of Nepal, and by the government since 1968. The organizational set-up of the Family Planning and Maternal and Child Health Project of the government is diagrammed. This program provides free services at 265 clinics throughout the country. Special attention is given to prenatal, postnatal, immunization, and nutrition education care to combat the extremely high infant mortality rate in Nepal. Charts present family planning and maternal and child health achievements in the last several years. Funding and financial management are discussed. Foreign assistance is badly needed by the program.
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  18. 18
    702895

    The National Family Planning Programme in Pakistan.

    Sadik N

    In: Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Development Center. International assistance for population programmes: recipient and donor views. Paris, OECD, 1970. p. 107-133

    Pakistan has been experiencing an increasing rate of population growth since the beginning of the 20th century. During the period from 1960 to 1965, about 40% of the economic growth was absorbed by population increase. In order to deal with this problem, the Family Planning Association of Pakistan was founded in 1953. It soon became recognized that the government would need to assume primary responsibility if family planning efforts were to be successful. The 3rd plan of Pakistan includes a revised and more comprehensive family planning scheme. The minimum goal set for the program is to reduce the birthrate from an estimated 50-40/1000 by reaching all the estimated 20,000,000 fertile couples by the year 1970. The current scheme in Pakistan is postulated on the following 6 basic assumptions: 1) family planning efforts need to be public relations oriented and not merely clinical; 2) operations should be conducted through autonomous bodies with decentralized authority; 3) monetary incentives play an important role; 4) interpersonal motivation in terms of life experiences of the clientele through familiar contacts along with mass media publicity should be used; 5) supplies and services should be easily available to all people; and 6) training, evaluation, and research should be multidimensional and continual as an integral part of the program. During the 4th Plan, 1970-1975, family planning efforts will be greatly expanded. Some of the main features of the 4th Plan will be an expansion of the field structure, more emphasis on training research and evaluation, inclusion of hormonal contraceptives, and increased relaince on sterilization.
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  19. 19
    752828

    Family planning in five continents.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, IPPF, November 1975. 28 p.

    This is a reference book for individuals working in family planning, population, and related fields. It lists 120 associations and 74 officially established government programs with 16 additional governments providing some services in family planning. 38 countries, mostly in Africa, Still have no organized family planning services available. Demographic and family planning information is given for Africa, America, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, and each country in all 5 of these regions. The nature of family planning services available is indicated for each country.
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  20. 20
    753836

    The Gambia (Family planning).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, January 1975. 6 p.

    According to 1973 figures, the total population of Gambia is 494,279 and the population growth rate is 4.7%. In 1967 infant mortality was estimated at 122/1000 in Banjul and 500/1000 in rural areas where health services are extremely limited. In 1970 there was 1 hospital in Banjul, 9 rural health centers, 24 dispensaries, and 34 subdispensaries. An increasing demand for abortion, particularly in the Banjul-Kombo-St. Ma ry area, has been reported. Family planning services are provided by the Family Planning Association of Gambia (FPAG), established in 1969, at its 5 clinics. Additionally, a number of health centers are visited by the FPAG. Efforts are now being taken to persuade the government to adopt a population policy and a plan for integrating family planning services into the national health services program. For the 1st half of 1974 Association figures show 791 new acceptors of contraceptive methods, 711 continuing acceptors, and 1442 total visits to the FPAG clinics. Regarding information and education, the FPAG is presently working among both youth and various groups of rural extension personnel. In 1974 the intention had been to increase the motivational literature in 2 of the local languages and to begin the publication of motivational literature in other local languages. In 1975 the Informati on and Education Department will cooperate with the fieldwork cadre in order to receive program feedback. Consequently, fieldworkers will be more actively involved in the preparation of suitable family planning materials.
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  21. 21
    745602

    Republic of Korea (Family planning).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, February 1974. 10 p.

    The Planned Parenthood Federation of Korea (PPFK) was founded in 196 1 to act as a pressure group to persuade the government to set up a family planning program. In 1962 the Korean government became 1 of the 1st in the world with such an official program. PPFK has a permanent staff of 62 at headquarters and 135 at branch offices to implement the information/education program. It was formerly responsible for the training for the government effort and it continues to initiate research and pilot projects. It also indirectly supports the clincs at Seoul National University and Yonsei University Medical colleges, runs 14 demonstration clincs, and has a mobile team unit in Taegi City and surrounding rural areas. Since 1968 it has organized "Mothers' Classes" which have been integrated into the rural community development program. Special projects include a "Stop at 2" campaign which the government officially adopted. The "Two Child Family" club was started in Seoul in 1971 and is expanding. UNFPA is funding an information, education, and communication campaign that will explore various uses of mass media. Pilot telephone consultation was begun in 1973. Vasectomy information is being given to the Homeland Reserve Force, an education project has been started for civil servants, and student newspapers are being used to reach the student population. PPFK has national responsib ility for clinical trials of new contraceptives. Tests on Minovlar ED continue and the results of Neovlar trials are being analyzed. Details of the government organizations are given. Research being carried on at various universities and in other agencies is also capsuled.
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  22. 22
    735203

    Indonesia (Family planning).

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, June 1973. 10 p.

    The Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA) was founded in 1957 and pioneered family planning services. It made little headway duri ng the pronatalist Sukarno regime, but in 1967 the present government announced an intensive family planning program and the IPPA was named as an implementing unit in 1971. 2 primary roles now are the training activities for fieldworkers and the development of community education and motivation programs. This complements the national mass media program. In 1970 the government took over all clinics except those in the Outer Islands (the islands outside Java, Bali, and Madura). The IPPA runs 150 clinics in the Outer Islands, is responsible for all supplies and maintenance, and has a number of model clinics in Java and Bali. The Community Education program has 8 components: speakers bureau, family planning clubs, mobile audiovisual units, exhibitions, tr aditional media, special events, local mass media support, and evaluatio n. In 1971 the 'ippa trained 2951 people; in 1972 this was increased by 25%. In 1973 the target is training 3000 fieldworkers with 16 centers for training and 16 field demonstration areas. An agreement with the U.N. Fund for Population Activities/International Development Association (UNFPA/IDA) will provide for building, equipping, and staffing. The research and evaluation function is also expanding to complement government activities. The government program aims to train 20,250 medical and paramedical personnel over 5 years and medical schools have incorporated the teaching of population and family planning. Government allowances are being curtailed for all children over 3 for government workers. An active clinic program aims to set up 1200 fully equipped and 1250 moderately equipped facilities by 1973. An active media campaign has been launched and for the 1st time in the population field the UNFPA and the IDA are helping to finance a project to expand a family planning program and broaden its activities. This su pport will provide for physical facilities, technical assistance, training, motivation, evaluation, research, and population education.
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  23. 23
    745597

    Laos (Family Planning)

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    IPPF Situation Report, February 1974. 6 p.

    Laos has been so torn by war and continuing waves of refugees that i t has been difficult to provide basic medical services to the population . In 1969 Laos had 53 medical doctors, 40 of whom were foreign instructors at the School of Medicine, 676 practical nurses, and 400 trained midwives. Before 1971 the government was opposed to family planning. A study commission in that year, however, examined population growth problems and recommended support for family planning. The voluntary association had been formed in 1966 and had sent representatives to international workshops. After the change in government attitude, the association has actively acted to distribute family planning supplies to villages, train midwives as motivators, and give additional training to public health center heads, home economists, medical assistants, and refugee village heads. The governmental emphasis is on better spacing of births rather than limitation. It took over operation of 7 association clinics in 1973 and now helps provide contraceptive services. The association still has 5 fixed and 6 mobile clinics. A refugee pilot program which opened in 1971 now has a permanent building and a full-time rural midwife. The association also stresses influencing opinion leaders through lecture forums, pamphlets, radio commercials, and film shows. Information and Education teams were formed to conduct 2-3 day seminar-lectures in other provinces to diverse groups like village headmen, town influentials, teachers, and other leaders. Many foreign groups have provided assistance, supplies, training, and other aid. WHO is helping with the integration of family planning into the nursing and midwifery curricula in the schools of Laos.
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  24. 24
    733802

    Profiles of donor agencies and training institutions providing IE&C assistance.

    Buck E; Radel D; Worrall RP

    In: Johnson, W.B., Wilder, F., and Bogue, D.J., eds. Information, educat ion and communication in population and family planning: a guide for national action. Chicago, University of Chicago, Community and Family St udy Center, 1973. p. 144-181

    The information, education, and communication (IE&C) assistance serv ices provided by 24 donor agencies and 13 non-grant-making organizations are summarized. Each summary indicated the nature of the agency's inter est in population/family planning and the services it offers to assist in the development of IE&C components of population programs in developing countries. The donor agencies include the Asia Foundation; Canadian International Development Agency; Colombo Plan for Economic Development in South and Southeast Asia; Church World Service; Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East; Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations; Ford Foundation; International Development Resear ch Centre; International Labor Organization; International Planned Parenthood Federation; Organization of American States; Pan American Health Organization; Pathfinder Fund; Population Council; Population Crisis Committee; Rockefeller Foundation; Swedish International Development Authority; United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization; UN Fund for Population Activities; US Agency for International Development; World Education; World Bank; World Health Organization; and World Neighbors.
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  25. 25
    713771

    Population program assistance: Aid to developing countries by the United States, other nations and international and private agencies.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]. Office of Population

    Washington, D.C., U.S. Government Printing Office, December 1971. 232 p

    This fifth annual report on population program assistance contains information on the following: 1) developments in population policy, population programs, fertility research, delivery of services, information and education, and manpower training; 2) analyses of world demographic trends; 3) assistance in the population field as provided by the U.S. government through USAID, Department of State, U.S. Information Agency, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, and the Peace Corps; 4) assistance from private organizaitons, multilateral agencies, and other governments; 5) demographic information and population activities for 79 developing countries and brief reports on several others; 6) world population data by country for 1970; and 7) a description and funding level of AID projects in population and family planning.
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