Your search found 51 Results

  1. 1
    390053

    Winners of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health-Global Health: Science and Practice Annual Student Manuscript Contest [editorial]

    Shelton JD; Buekens P; Grant E

    Global Health: Science and Practice. 2017 Mar 24; 5(1):4-5.

    The 2 inaugural winners of the CUGH–GHSP Annual Student Manuscript Contest describe (1) the American Mock World Health Organization model for engaging students in global health policy and diplomacy, and (2) a successful Indo-U.S. twinning model of global health academic partnership led by students.
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  2. 2
    382419
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO Collaborating Centre for Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome for the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University, Kuwait.

    Altawalah H; Al-Nakib W

    Medical Principles and Practice. 2014; 23 Suppl 1:47-51.

    In the early 1980s, the World Health Organization (WHO) designated the Virology Unit of the Faculty of Medicine, Health Sciences Centre, Kuwait University, Kuwait, a collaborating centre for AIDS for the Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office (EMRO), recognizing it to be in compliance with WHO guidelines. In this centre, research integral to the efforts of WHO to combat AIDS is conducted. In addition to annual workshops and symposia, the centre is constantly updating and renewing its facilities and capabilities in keeping with current and latest advances in virology. As an example of the activities of the centre, the HIV-1 RNA viral load in plasma samples of HIV-1 patients is determined by real-time PCR using the AmpliPrep TaqMan HIV-1 test v2.0. HIV-1 drug resistance is determined by sequencing the reverse transcriptase and protease regions on the HIV-1 pol gene, using the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Assay on the OpenGene(R) DNA Sequencing System. HIV-1 subtypes are determined by sequencing the reverse transcriptase and protease regions on the HIV-1 pol gene using the genotyping assays described above. A fundamental program of Kuwait's WHO AIDS collaboration centre is the national project on the surveillance of drug resistance in human deficiency virus in Kuwait, which illustrates how the centre and its activities in Kuwait can serve the EMRO region of WHO. (c) 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.
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  3. 3
    313139

    Joint ILO / UNESCO Southern African Subregional Workshop, 30 November - 2 December 2005, Maputo, Mozambique. Improving responses to HIV / AIDS in education sector workplaces. Report.

    International Labour Organization [ILO]; UNESCO

    Geneva, Switzerland, ILO, 2006. 63 p.

    The workshop was organized under the auspices of an ILO programme initiated in 2004, developing a sectoral approach to HIV/AIDS education sector workplaces, as a complement to the ILO's code of practice HIV/AIDS and the world of work, adopted in 2001. A number of research papers and assessments prepared by international organizations in recent years have highlighted the impact of HIV and AIDS on the education sector workforce in developing countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. High prevalence results in morbidity and mortality rates which deprive affected countries of some of their most educated and skilled human resources. In addition, teachers are often not trained or supported to deal with HIV in schools, and the disease has also affected the management capacity of education systems. In 2005, UNESCO joined the ILO in a collaborative project, aimed at the development of an HIV and AIDS workplace policy and related resource materials for use by education staff and stakeholders at national and institutional levels in southern African countries. The workshop in Maputo brought together representatives of government (ministries of labour and education), employer organizations and teacher/educator unions from seven countries to participate in this process, along with representatives of regional and international organizations (see Appendix 1 for list of participants). (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    313129

    Expanding the field of inquiry: a cross-country study of higher education institutions' responses to HIV and AIDS.

    UNESCO. Division of Higher Education

    Paris, France, UNESCO, 2006 Mar. 73 p. (ED-2006/WS/25; CLD 27584)

    This report compares, analyses, and summarises findings from twelve case studies commissioned by the United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in higher education institutions in Brazil, Burkina Faso, China, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Dominican Republic, Haiti, Jamaica, Lebanon, Lesotho, Suriname, Thailand, and Viet Nam. It aims to deepen the understanding of the impact of HIV and AIDS on tertiary institutions and the institutional response to the epidemic in different social and cultural contexts, at varying stages of the epidemic, and in different regions of the world. The overall objective is to identify relevant and appropriate actions that higher education institutions worldwide can take to prevent the further spread of HIV, to manage the impact of HIV and AIDS on the higher education sector, and to mitigate the effects of HIV and AIDS on individuals, campuses, and communities. Specific focus includes: Institutional HIV and AIDS policies and plans; Leadership on HIV and AIDS; Education related to HIV and AIDS (including pre- and in-service training, formal and nonformal education); HIV and AIDS research; Partnerships and networks; HIV and AIDS programmes and services; and Community outreach. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    305296

    UNU / IUNS nutrition capacity building efforts in Africa.

    Pepping F

    SCN News. 2006; (33):39-42.

    The 1996 Manila meeting and subsequent meeting in Cape Town in 1999 stimulated capacity development activities within UNU and IUNS. IN 2000, several African regional capacity task forces held initial planning meetings to develop an overall action plan. The plan was accepted during the SCN meeting in April 2001 in Nairobi. Most of the activities outlined in the action plan were implemented in 2002. This paper reviews progress of these activities, directly or indirectly through the work of Food & Nutrition Programme of the United Nations University (UNU-FNP). (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    296442

    Studying the Millennium Development Goals: a resource for university education.

    Otieno A

    UN Chronicle. 2004 Dec; 41(4):[3] p..

    The work of Nobel Prize-winning economist Amartya Sen, such as Development as Freedom, suggests that studying development offers a fertile ground for investigation and training. The beauty of the whole idea is that this possibility transcends traditional divisions of the world into more and less developed, and lends itself to encompassing components of the emerging idea of human security. Thus, the UN Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) can be seen as a resource for education at various levels. Almost all States are committed to achieving the eight MDGs by 2015: eradicate extreme poverty and hunger; achieve universal primary education; promote gender equality and empower women; reduce child mortality; improve maternal health; combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases; ensure environmental sustainability; and develop a global partnership for health. Several studies on the MDGs and breakdowns of their attainment are emerging. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    295381
    Peer Reviewed

    Report of a pre ICN workshop on Negotiating the Future of Nutrition, Johannesburg, South Africa, 18 September 2005.

    Yach D; Eloff T; Vorster HH; Margetts BM

    Public Health Nutrition. 2005 Dec; 8(8):1229-1230.

    Good nutrition underpins good health. That reality has been shown in repeated studies and quantified most recently in the 2002 World Health Report of the World Health Organization (WHO). In that report, food and nutrition (their lack or over-consumption) accounted for considerable mortality and morbidity worldwide. Despite the compelling evidence of need, global action remains inadequate. Nutrition and food policy still receives considerably less attention in health policy and funding arenas than do many other lesser contributors to human health. Part of the reason relates to the lack of a strong coordinated voice for the broad area that is inclusive of all committed to and able to influence policies and actions for populations. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    279280

    Youth pledge fight for millennium goals.

    Randle WJ

    Africa Renewal. 2004 Oct; 18(3):[4] p..

    For young people across Africa, education is vital, argues Mohammed A. Latif Mbengue, a 28-year-old graduate student at Senegal's Cheikh Anta Diop University. The fact that African countries have not yet succeeded in working together to solve the continent's problems has hampered access to education. "The lack of coordination makes it very difficult for me if I want to study at another African university." He believes that the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), which emphasizes regional integration, can help. He also thinks that the global campaign to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) is essential. Endorsed by world leaders in 2000, the MDGs campaign has set targets that include reducing by half the number of people living in poverty by the year 2015, to ensure that all children complete primary education and to combat HIV/AIDS. When African leaders drew up NEPAD the following year, they incorporated the MDGs within their plan. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    186763

    Getting to the Third World: agencies as gatekeepers.

    Jensen K

    In: Women, international development, and politics: the bureaucratic mire. Updated and expanded edition, edited by Kathleen Staudt. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Temple University Press, 1997. 269-286.

    What follows is a narrative of a personal journey into Third World gender redistributive research and the bureaucracies encountered along the way. It is not possible to analyze in full the organization and agenda of each, even in this case study focusing on Women in Development (WID) programs through U.S. Agency for International Development (AID) projects. Rather, I aim to enumerate them and to describe the typical gatekeepers in the path from a home university through development consortia and AID at home and abroad as well as implementing agencies in a host country. In addition, this path requires a recognized WID program at each junction, lest one be left climbing the fence in unofficial and probably unapproved ways. The point of this journey is to analyze the possibilities of improving the opportunities for women less advantaged than those of us who can afford to make getting to the Third World part of our work. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    186645

    Women's studies and developing countries: focus on Asia.

    Chamberlain MK; Howe F

    In: The women and international development annual. Volume 4, edited by Rita S. Gallin, Anne Ferguson, and Janice Harper. Boulder, Colorado, Westview Press, 1995. 51-75.

    The growth of women's studies since 1970 has not been limited to the United States. Similar developments, some as dramatic, have been underway in other countries where there were networks of women scholars and activists. The United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand have made significant advances since the 1970s in women's studies research and in the number and range of courses available. Elsewhere courses appeared on the European continent, particularly in West Germany, the Netherlands, and the Scandinavian countries, where strong government support was available. In most developing countries, however, women's studies as such was little known prior to 1980. The notable exception was India. Here the origins of women's studies are attributable to the investigations of the Committee on the Status of Women in India, which were carried out from 1971 to 1974. The Committee's Report highlighted a lack of knowledge about the diversity of women's lives and pointed to the need for further research and reappraisal of the traditional assumptions of the social sciences. With that background, the Indian Council of Social Science Research (ICSSR) established a Programme of Women's Studies in 1976 "to develop new perspectives in the social sciences--through examining basic assumptions, methodological approaches and concepts concerning the family, household, women's work, productivity, economic activity--to remedy the neglect and underassessment of women's contributions to the society. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    183193

    Abstracts of M.A. (Demography) dissertations: 1987-1996.

    University of Dar es Salaam. Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Demographic Training Unit

    Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, University of Dar es Salaam, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Demographic Training Unit, [1997]. xi, 124 p.

    The publication of the "Review of Information Sources on Population and Development in Tanzania" by Professor Ophelia Mascarenhas in 1990 was so far the only available annotated bibliography on the subject in Tanzania. Needless to say it is not uncommon for Tanzanian researchers and consumers of research findings in most disciplines to be unaware of available literature within the country. This is worsened by the lack of systematic data bases whereby one can search for the literature in a computer. Most research that is done in the country either ends up in shelves or if it is published the general public may not have access to it. Since the masters programme in Demography started in 1985 at the University of Dares Salaam under the sponsorship of the United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) over seventy dissertations have been written in various areas pertaining to population and development. However, these dissertations have not been readily available to people working in the area of population in the country and as such the research findings have only remained in the academic circles. The publication of these dissertation abstracts for the period 1987-1996 will supposedly be of utility to planners and policy makers since its circulation to such people will be taken seriously; more so to researchers who without necessarily reading the dissertations will be able to refer to them. This work has been supported financially by UNFP A through the Demographic Training Unit at the University of Dares Salaam and our sincere gratitude to them. However, the ideas expressed in this publication are purely those of the authors and UNFPA bears no responsibility whatsoever. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    179474

    Education for peace.

    Miles L

    In: War and public health, edited by Barry S. Levy, Victor W. Sidel. Washington, D.C., American Public Health Association [APHA], 2000. 323-335.

    Why have educators failed to change in a changing world? There are at least three long-standing flaws in the academy, which work against change: departmental structure, misunderstanding of international education, and the narrow education of faculty. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    092034

    Increasing the relevance of education for health professionals. Report of a WHO Study Group on Problem-Solving Education for the Health Professions.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Study Group on Problem-Solving Education for the Health Professions

    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES. 1993; (838):i-iv, 1-29.

    A consideration of current practices in problem-solving education for the health professions was the agenda of a World Health Organization (WHO) Study Group convened in Geneva, Switzerland, in October 1992. The group widened its concerns to provide a general outline of how health professional educational institutions (HPEIs) can influence health care delivery by redefining and expanding their role into the domain of health policy and service delivery. The committee's report presents information on such educational innovations as problem-based learning, student-centered education, community-based education, and community-oriented education. The effects of these innovations can be measured in terms of outcomes for the individual and outcomes for the HPEI, which include effects on the HPEIs themselves and effects on the community health sector. The report discusses 1) creating links with new partners by identifying and solving priority health problems in and with the community, 2) working in the community, 3) shaping health policy through the appropriate use of pharmaceuticals, 4) the effective use of health personnel, 5) the rational allocation of human resources, and 6) health-related legislation. The group addressed strategies for change as they apply to health systems and (HPEIs) including such barriers to changes as fear of a loss of control, failure to align innovation with the perceived needs of the HPEI or service, specific behavior on the part of innovators which jeopardized the change process, fear that change will erode professional excellence or undermine the reward system, and security considerations. Strategies for changes include encouraging broad participation, ensuring that all participating constituencies benefit, maintaining links with other innovative programs, and encouraging participation through a reward system. Organization and practical issues addressed in the committee report include factors involved with getting started, resource needs for curricular development, selecting community sites, and creating favorable administrative structures. The committee recommended that HPEIs review their mission statements, establish partnerships in the community, conduct action research, shift resources to health systems research, ensure the relevance of educational programs, evaluate programs in terms of their impact practice, ensure the use of problem-based learning techniques, and support longterm evaluation. WHO member states were advised to provide incentives and remove unnecessary barriers to collaboration, to use the potential of HPEIs to improve the health sector, to provide financial and administrative support for action research, and to ensure that research findings guide policy development. Finally, the group recommended that WHO encourage the development of guidelines and models to support action research, collaborate with HPEIs which express an interest in developing pilot collaborative projects, and encourage research efforts in HPEIs which have begun such collaboration.
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  14. 14
    011862

    Revised project request: In-school Population and Family Life Education.

    Yemen. People's Democratic Republic of

    [Unpublished] [1980]. 10 p. (UNFPA Project no. PDY-79-P07)

    The objectives of the In-School Population and Family Life Education Project of the People's Democratic Republic of Yemen include the following: to launch a comprehensive population and family life education program to help in speeding population awareness and understanding of the country's demographic situation; to introduce population education into the new curricula at different levels of the school system; to introduce population and family life education into the preservice and inservice teacher training curricula of the higher college of education; to produce 2 university level reference books; to develop resource materials of audiovisual aids for training of key personnel; to prepare special training programs for pioneer teachers and other selected teachers to enable them to train inservice teachers and to produce instructional materials; to train approximately 1000 unity school level teachers and 160 pioneer teachers and 40 audiovisual pioneers in 4 years; to train approximately 1500 preservice teachers and 600 inservice teachers at the higher college of education; and to reinforce the research activities in the Education Research Center in the field of population and family life. The project is under the Ministry of Education's Educational Research Center (ERC) with the General Director of ERC as its national director and the Deputy Director of ERC as national coordinator. The activities of this school project include: curriculum development in university, secondary, and primary schools; production of textbooks, reference books, and audiovisual teaching aids for teachers and students at different levels; and a teacher training program. Teacher training in the regular preservice and inservice teachers training courses in the Higher College of Education will take place over the September 1981 through June 1984 period. The training of 160 pioneer teachers will occur through special courses held during March/April of 1981, 1982, 1983, and 1984. The training of 1000 selected teachers in the Ministry of Education training centers will take place during July/August 1981, 1982, 1983, 1984. The government contribution for this project is $273,440. The contribution of the UN Fund for Population Activities is $82,484 for 1980 and $198,858 for 1981. The approximate starting date of the project is October 1980, and the approximate date of completion is 1984.
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  15. 15
    002384

    Proceedings of the joint UPM/UNESCO Workshop on Planning and Coordinating Non-Formal Education Programme on Population Education, Universiti Pertanian Malaysia, May 28-30, 1979.

    Workshop Secretariat

    Serdang, Selangor, Universiti Pertanian Malaysia, Center for Extension and Continuing Education, 1979. 62 p.

    Objectives of the joint Universiti Pertanian Malaysia/United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UPM/UNESCO) Workshop on Planning and Coordinating Non-Formal Education Program on Population Education were the following: to invite all the government and nongovernmental agencies to share their programs and experiences with each other; to identify common needs and problems; to develop an interagency national program for out-of-school education and to identify the activities within; to identify the agency which can provide the necessary leadership in this area; and to discuss how population education can be integrated into the agency programs within the scope of the other interagency national programs. Included in this report of the Workshop proceedings are reports of the following agencies: Fisheries Division; Community Development Division; the National Extension Project of the Department of Agriculture; the Veterinary Division; Population Education Unit of the Curriculum Development Center; Federation of Family Planning Association; Rubber Industry Smallholder Development Authority; National Family Planning Board; Ministry of Health; Universiti Pertanian Malaysia; Farmers Organization Authority; and the Ministry of Culture, Youth and Sports. Working papers on the subjects of planning and developing out-of-school population programs in Asia and Oceania and the potentials and strategies for integrating population elements in non-formal education programs are also included. It was determined that the integration of population education elements into non-formal education programs could be realized by leading agencies initiating programs such as organizing seminars and by training staff to be well-equipped in population and extension development.
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  16. 16
    167667

    Gender, access to learning and production of knowledge in Africa.

    Assie-Lumumba NT

    In: AAWORD / AFARD 5th General Assembly (19-24 July 1999). "Visions of Gender Theories and Social Development in Africa: Harnessing Knowledge for Social Justice and Equality, [compiled by] Association of African Women for Research and Development [AAWORD]. Dakar, Senegal, AAWORD, 2001. 95-113. (AAWORD Book Series)

    This paper analyzes some implications of the persistent under-representation of girls and women in education in Africa, with a specific reference to women's limited participation in knowledge production. It also examines the negative impact of the World Bank and International Monetary Fund’s structural adjustment programs on Africa’s educational system. The first section presents a conceptual and historical discussion of the issues. The second section addresses the current educational distribution along gender lines, noting especially the lack of women in higher education. The author also warns women to question whether the values transmitted through higher education perpetuate norms of patriarchy and inequality. The third section examines African women's role in the production of knowledge.
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  17. 17
    136876

    Protecting breast feeding from breast milk substitutes. Royal college supports promotion of breast feeding [letter]

    Marcovitch H; Lynch M; Dodd K

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 1998 Oct 3; 317(7163):949-50.

    The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health suggested interventions to increase the number of women who breast feed their babies in its report to the Acheson inquiry on poverty and health. The UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) had a stand, which offered information on its 1991 initiative promoting breast feeding, at the trade exhibition of the college's annual general meeting in 1998. Members and fellows gave unequivocal support to a policy statement which encouraged exclusive breast feeding for the first 4-6 months of an infant's life followed by breast feeding accompanied by weaning food for as long as the mother wished. However, Costello and Sachdev, in discussing attempts by manufacturers of infant formula to seek "endorsement by association" or "passivity towards their products," chastised the Royal College for not joining an interagency group on breast feeding and for accepting research funds from infant formula manufacturers. The College did not join the interagency group because of concerns regarding the proposed research methodology. The College will accept no more research funds or donations from infant formula manufacturers until the recommendations and report of its ethics committee regarding breast milk substitute marketing, which were requested by the 1997 annual general meeting, are finished in late 1998.
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  18. 18
    134647

    [Research centers and the teaching of demography] Centri di ricerca e di insegnamento della demographia.

    Maffioli D

    In: Demographie: analyse et synthese. Causes et consequences des evolutions demographiques, Volume 1. Rome, Italy, Universita degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Dipartimento di Scienze Demografiche, 1997 Sep. 291-310.

    Various international institutions of demography have played a leading role in research over the years including the Population Division of the UN, the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, and the Comite International de Cooperation dans les Recherches Nationales in Demographie. Demographic research dates back to the work of J.P. Suessmilch in the 18th century, who first systematized such figures, and it reached its maturity in the second half of the 19th century, when the first International Congress of Demography was held in Paris in 1878, at which the term demography (coined in 1855 by A. Guillard) was officially accepted. In 1927, the separation of demography from statistics was demonstrated on an international level by the first World Population Conference held in Geneva. Margaret Sanger conceived the idea of the conference declaring that unchecked population growth could profoundly alter human civilization. In 1928, the International Union for the Scientific Investigation of Population was founded affirming the autonomy of demography. Population Index was founded in 1933, followed by various national demographic journals. Demography, the present organ of the Population Association of America, was founded in 1964, and Population and Development Review in 1974. After the second World War, a period of impasse set in, but during the 1950s and 1960s academic studies flourished, especially those preoccupying politicians and the public: the low fertility in the UK and France, international migration in the US, and above all, the growth of global population, primarily in the Third World. Intervention programs were formulated by specialized UN organizations (FAO, UNESCO, UNFPA) whose activities continue in conjunction with the research efforts of over 600 research centers worldwide.
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  19. 19
    136418

    New challenges for public health. Report of an interregional meeting, Geneva, 27-30 November 1995.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1996. [2], 90 p. (WHO/HRH/96.4)

    This booklet contains the report of a 1995 Interregional Meeting on New Public Health convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) to 1) consider the new challenges to public health rising from globalization, new diseases and epidemics, entrenched public health concerns, changing societal values, and the lack of new social sector resources and 2) formulate possible responses to these challenges. After an introduction, the report opens by reprinting a paper on the new public health and WHO's ninth general program of work, which was prepared to stimulate discussion at the meeting. The next section summarizes discussions during the meeting. Consideration of the context of public health looked at 1) the new public health and key determinants of health; 2) poverty, equity, and intersectoral partnerships; and 3) the role of WHO. Consideration of the content of public health included 1) a semantic debate on the "new" public health; 2) the content of the new public health; and 3) new public health challenges and responses. A discussion of education and research focused on training venues, the core content of training, and diversity of the public health work force. For each of these topics, the report includes specific statements adopted by the meeting. Finally, the report offers four recommendations to schools of public health, four to the WHO, and five to national governments.
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  20. 20
    133443

    In sickness or in health: TDR's parners. 7. Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.

    TDR NEWS. 1998 Feb; (55):8, 10.

    Mahidol University's Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand, established in 1960, is one of 14 faculties, 5 institutions, 5 centers, and 2 colleges within Mahidol University. It consists of the following departments: Helminthology, Medical Entomology, Microbiology and Immunology, Protozoology, Social and Environmental Medicine, Tropical Hygiene, Tropical Medicine, Tropical Nutrition and Food Science, Tropical Pediatrics, Tropical Pathology, and Tropical Radioisotopes. The UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases (TDR) has been associated with the Faculty since 1977, collaborating mainly upon malaria research, but also in filariasis, leprosy, and schistosomiasis research. Early TDR support was directed at research training and institutional strengthening, although by the early 1980s, the Faculty played an increasingly important role in TDR's research and development program. In recent years, the Faculty has focused upon researching malaria, parasitic and bacterial diseases, nutrition and food sciences, and environmental health. The Faculty's malaria-related research is described. The Faculty also conducts research in many other areas of tropical medicine outside of those of interest to TDR.
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  21. 21
    130880

    Claiming and using indigenous knowledge.

    Appleton H; Fernandez ME; Hill CL; Quiroz C

    In: Missing links: gender equity in science and technology for development, [compiled by] United Nations. Commission on Science and Technology for Development. Gender Working Group. Ottawa, Canada, International Development Research Centre [IDRC], 1995. 55-81.

    This document is the third chapter in a book complied by the UN Gender Working Group (GWG) that explores the overlay of science and technology (S&T), sustainable human development, and gender issues. This chapter addresses the nature of indigenous knowledge systems, their potential role in sustainable and equitable development, and possible strategies for promoting mutually beneficial exchanges between local and S&T knowledge systems. The introduction notes 1) that local knowledge science systems differ from modern S&T because they are managed by users of knowledge and are holistic, 2) gender roles lead to differentiation in the kind of local knowledge and skills acquired by women and by men, and 3) sustainable and equitable development depends upon full recognition and reinforcement of local knowledge systems. The chapter continues with an analysis of 1) gender, biodiversity, and new agrotechnologies; 2) gender and intellectual property rights, especially in regard to biotechnological developments based on local knowledge; and 3) the work of governments, universities, nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and local groups in the areas of S&T programs with women, general women's programs, and programs focused on indigenous knowledge (with an emphasis on research in gender and indigenous knowledge systems, women promoting diversity, the comparative advantage of indigenous knowledge, and the role of NGOs and information networks). Next, the chapter considers the work of the UN and its agencies through a review of documents containing S&T agreements; support for women's rights; and work in the areas of indigenous people, biodiversity, and intellectual property rights. The chapter ends by identifying areas of critical concern and research needs.
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  22. 22
    113445

    Guide to sources of international population assistance 1991, sixth edition: multilateral agencies; regional agencies; bilateral agencies; non-governmental organizations; university centres; research institutions; training organizations.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1991. xvii, 386 p. (United Nations Population Fund Population Programmes and Projects Vol. 1)

    This guide, in its sixth edition since 1976, reflects a broad view of the definition of international population assistance. Therefore, included are many organizations and agencies that offer services rather than direct funding and that offer services only if funding is available. Listings are also included of demographic and research training institutions if they are concerned with developing countries and not limited to their own countries. The guide is divided into four sections: 1) multilateral organizations and agencies; 2) regional organizations and agencies; 3) bilateral agencies; and 4) nongovernmental organizations, universities, research institutions, and training organizations. The entries include such information as a general description of each agency, selected program areas, areas in which assistance is provided, support activities available, restrictions, channels of assistance, how to apply for assistance, monitoring and evaluation, reporting requirements, and addresses.
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  23. 23
    094846

    Training methodologies for integration of population variables into development planning, with particular reference to the UNFPA Global Programme of Training in Population and Development.

    Mazouz M

    In: Population and development planning. Proceedings of the United Nations International Symposium on Population and Development Planning, Riga, Latvian Soviet Socialist Republic, 4-8 December 1989, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of Economic and Social Development. New York, New York, United Nations, 1993. 275-82. (ST/ESA/SER.R/116)

    This discussion focuses on a UN Population Fund training strategy as part of the Global Program of Training in Population and Development. This training involves senior officials with a policy and decision-making role, senior professionals, executives and technicians, academics, midlevel government officials, managers, and program administrators. The program was launched in 1986 for developing country candidates within the Catholic University of Louvain at Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium; the Center for Development Studies at Trivandrum, India; and the Institute of Social Studies in cooperation with the Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute in the Hague. The discussion of program activities includes teaching methods, the techniques for integrated programs, and support skills. The conclusion after two years of program experience is that the approach is appropriate, offers practical skill building, and opens people up to thinking in new ways about their disciplines. The problems are a lack of data or poor quality of data, endogeneity, behavioral content, user friendliness, and lack of technical background of some participants. Feedback from participants was positive about the concept and practice of integrated population and development programs. Program objectives are building national capacity in integration of population into development strategies, policies, and programs. Individuals are trained to examine the effect of population policy options on development planning and vice versa. Courses are directed to the attainment of functional knowledge, skills, and techniques for implementing basic planning and research and preparing "clear, succinct, and coherent" policy and program statements. Skills are developed for translating policy into programs and implementing policies and programs in a complex context. A variety of teaching methods are used for training.
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  24. 24
    095114

    Partners: existing health institutions.

    Rosenbaum J

    In: Partners against AIDS: lessons learned. AIDSCOM, [compiled by] Academy for Educational Development [AED]. AIDS Public Health Communication Project [AIDSCOM]. Washington, D.C., AED, 1993 Nov. 67-76. (USAID Contract No. DPE-5972-Z-00-7070-00)

    AIDSCOM's Resident Advisor to the WHO Caribbean Epidemiology Centre (CAREC) discussed partnerships with existing health institutions. These institutions included Ministries of Health, multilateral agencies (e.g., WHO and UNICEF), family planning associations, universities, international private voluntary organizations, bilateral agencies (e.g., Canadian International Development Agency), and indigenous nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). AIDSCOM helped them develop an appropriate and effective conceptual approach to HIV prevention, which generally meant integrating new HIV prevention skills and concepts into existing programs and activities. AIDSCOM technical assistance addressed issues of accessibility of health services, testing, counseling, policy and confidentiality. Technical assistance included improved planning and management, program design skills, materials development, training in prevention counseling and condom skills, and a model for personal and professional behavior regarding AIDS, sex and risk. A key factor contributing to a successful partnership with CAREC was continuity of AIDSCOM staff contact. AIDSCOM helped CAREC with social marketing and behavioral research. It helped CAREC and its national counterparts to develop a regional KABP protocol for all 19 countries. AIDSCOM helped implement the protocol and strategize how to develop programmatic activities based on the results. The identified activities were training health workers and HIV prevention counselors promoting condom skills, establishing 5 national AIDS hotlines, developing 3 national media campaigns, and developing music, theater, and radio dramas. AIDSCOM and CAREC became partners with local NGOs who had access to hard-to-reach groups. Lessons learned included: technical assistance helps heath projects shift program emphasis from information to behavior change; successful partnership result in innovative programs; and proven effectiveness can be replicated in parallel programs.
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  25. 25
    101205

    Guide to sources of international population assistance 1993. Seventh edition.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1994. xv, 383 p. (Population Programmes and Projects Vol. 1)

    For the purposes of this guide, the definition of "international population assistance" includes direct financial grants or loans to governments or nongovernmental organizations in developing countries to fund, in whole or in part, a range of population activities such as basic data collection; population policy development; and family planning programs, information, education, training, and research. International assistance also takes the form of indirect grants from one agency through another to a developing country or an institution in a developing country. It includes the provision of commodities, equipment, and vehicles as well as technical and other support. It also encompasses the activities of organizations that offer training programs, expert and advisory services, and research in their special fields of competence; all of which offer valuable information for the formulation of population policies and programs. The Guide is organized into 4 major sections: the first section describes multilateral (UN) organizations and agencies; the second presents regional organizations and agencies, first in general and then those which are specific for Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, as well as the Middle East and Western Asia; the third section deals with bilateral agencies; and the final section covers nongovernmental organizations, university centers, research institutions, and training organizations.
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