Your search found 9 Results

  1. 1
    375818

    WHO recommendations on antenatal care for a positive pregnancy experience: Ultrasound examination. Highlights and key messages from the World Health Organization’s 2016 Global Recommendations.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Maternal and Child Survival Program [MCSP]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2018 Jan. 4 p. (WHO/RHR/18.01; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00028)

    This brief highlights the WHO recommendation on routine antenatal ultrasound examination and the policy and program implications for translating this recommendation into action at the country level.
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  2. 2
    375817

    WHO recommendations on antenatal care for a positive pregnancy experience: Summary. Highlights and key messages from the World Health Organization’s 2016 Global Recommendations for Routine Antenatal Care.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Maternal and Child Survival Program [MCSP]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2018 Jan. 10 p. (WHO/RHR/18.02; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00028)

    This brief highlights the WHO’s 2016 ANC recommendations and offers countries policy and program considerations for adopting and implementing the recommendations. The recommendations include universal and context-specific interventions. The recommended interventions span five categories: routine antenatal nutrition, maternal and fetal assessment, preventive measures, interventions for the management of common physiologic symptoms in pregnancy, and health system-level interventions to improve the utilization and quality of ANC.
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  3. 3
    376073
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization Fetal Growth Charts: A Multinational Longitudinal Study of Ultrasound Biometric Measurements and Estimated Fetal Weight.

    Kiserud T; Piaggio G; Carroli G; Widmer M; Carvalho J; Neerup Jensen L; Giordano D; Cecatti JG; Abdel Aleem H; Talegawkar SA; Benachi A; Diemert A; Tshefu Kitoto A; Thinkhamrop J; Lumbiganon P; Tabor A; Kriplani A; Gonzalez Perez R; Hecher K; Hanson MA; Gulmezoglu AM; Platt LD

    PloS Medicine. 2017 Jan; 14(1):e1002220.

    BACKGROUND: Perinatal mortality and morbidity continue to be major global health challenges strongly associated with prematurity and reduced fetal growth, an issue of further interest given the mounting evidence that fetal growth in general is linked to degrees of risk of common noncommunicable diseases in adulthood. Against this background, WHO made it a high priority to provide the present fetal growth charts for estimated fetal weight (EFW) and common ultrasound biometric measurements intended for worldwide use. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a multinational prospective observational longitudinal study of fetal growth in low-risk singleton pregnancies of women of high or middle socioeconomic status and without known environmental constraints on fetal growth. Centers in ten countries (Argentina, Brazil, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Denmark, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Norway, and Thailand) recruited participants who had reliable information on last menstrual period and gestational age confirmed by crown-rump length measured at 8-13 wk of gestation. Participants had anthropometric and nutritional assessments and seven scheduled ultrasound examinations during pregnancy. Fifty-two participants withdrew consent, and 1,387 participated in the study. At study entry, median maternal age was 28 y (interquartile range [IQR] 25-31), median height was 162 cm (IQR 157-168), median weight was 61 kg (IQR 55-68), 58% of the women were nulliparous, and median daily caloric intake was 1,840 cal (IQR 1,487-2,222). The median pregnancy duration was 39 wk (IQR 38-40) although there were significant differences between countries, the largest difference being 12 d (95% CI 8-16). The median birthweight was 3,300 g (IQR 2,980-3,615). There were differences in birthweight between countries, e.g., India had significantly smaller neonates than the other countries, even after adjusting for gestational age. Thirty-one women had a miscarriage, and three fetuses had intrauterine death. The 8,203 sets of ultrasound measurements were scrutinized for outliers and leverage points, and those measurements taken at 14 to 40 wk were selected for analysis. A total of 7,924 sets of ultrasound measurements were analyzed by quantile regression to establish longitudinal reference intervals for fetal head circumference, biparietal diameter, humerus length, abdominal circumference, femur length and its ratio with head circumference and with biparietal diameter, and EFW. There was asymmetric distribution of growth of EFW: a slightly wider distribution among the lower percentiles during early weeks shifted to a notably expanded distribution of the higher percentiles in late pregnancy. Male fetuses were larger than female fetuses as measured by EFW, but the disparity was smaller in the lower quantiles of the distribution (3.5%) and larger in the upper quantiles (4.5%). Maternal age and maternal height were associated with a positive effect on EFW, particularly in the lower tail of the distribution, of the order of 2% to 3% for each additional 10 y of age of the mother and 1% to 2% for each additional 10 cm of height. Maternal weight was associated with a small positive effect on EFW, especially in the higher tail of the distribution, of the order of 1.0% to 1.5% for each additional 10 kg of bodyweight of the mother. Parous women had heavier fetuses than nulliparous women, with the disparity being greater in the lower quantiles of the distribution, of the order of 1% to 1.5%, and diminishing in the upper quantiles. There were also significant differences in growth of EFW between countries. In spite of the multinational nature of the study, sample size is a limiting factor for generalization of the charts. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides WHO fetal growth charts for EFW and common ultrasound biometric measurements, and shows variation between different parts of the world.
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  4. 4
    340832

    Provisional remarks on Zika virus infection in pregnant women: Document for health care professionals.

    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]; World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Americas

    Montevideo, Uruguay, PAHO, 2016 Jan 25. [22] p.

    The aim of this document is to provide health care professionals in charge of the care of pregnant women with updated information based on the best evidence available for the prevention of infection, timely diagnosis, suggested therapy and monitoring of pregnant women, and notification of cases to the competent health authorities. The information presented in this document was updated on January 22, 2016; it may be further altered if new evidence appears on the effects / consequences of Zika virus Infection in pregnant women and their children. New updates may also be found regularly at www.paho.org/viruszika. (Excerpt)
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  5. 5
    310830
    Peer Reviewed

    Assessment of ultrasound morbidity indicators of schistosomiasis in the context of large-scale programs illustrated with experiences from Malian children.

    Koukounari A; Sacko M; Keita AD; Gabrielli AF; Landoure A

    American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2006 Dec; 75(6):1042-1052.

    We assessed morbidity indicators for both Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma mansoni infections and evaluated the appropriateness of the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for ultrasound in schistosomiasis in the context of large-scale control interventions. Abdominal and urinary tract ultrasonography was performed on 2,247 and 2,822 school children, respectively, from 29 randomly selected schools in Mali before the implementation of mass anthelminthic drug administration. Using two-level logistic regression models, we examined associations of potential factors with the risk of having a positive ultrasound global score (morbidity indicative of S. haematobium infection), abnormal image pattern scores, dilatation of the portal vein, and/or enlarged liver (morbidity indicative of S. mansoni infection). The WHO protocol was found useful for detection of S. haematobium pathology but overestimated the risk of portal vein dilatation and left liver lobe enlargement associated with S. mansoni infection. We conclude that ultrasonography should be included in large-scale control interventions, where logistics allow, but cautiously. (author's)
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  6. 6
    190745
    Peer Reviewed

    New reference values for thyroid volume by ultrasound in iodine-sufficient schoolchildren: a World Health Organization / Nutrition for Health and Development Iodine Deficiency Study Group Report.

    Zimmermann MB; Hess SY; Molinari L; de Benoist B; Delange F

    American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2004 Feb; 79(2):231-237.

    Goiter prevalence in school-age children is an indicator of the severity of iodine deficiency disorders (IDDs) in a population. In areas of mild-to-moderate IDDs, measurement of thyroid volume (Tvol) by ultrasound is preferable to palpation for grading goiter, but interpretation requires reference criteria from iodine-sufficient children. The study aim was to establish international reference values for Tvol by ultrasound in 6–12-y-old children that could be used to define goiter in the context of IDD monitoring. Tvol was measured by ultrasound in 6–12-y-old children living in areas of long-term iodine sufficiency in North and South America, central Europe, the eastern Mediterranean, Africa, and the western Pacific. Measurements were made by 2 experienced examiners using validated techniques. Data were log transformed, used to calculate percentiles on the basis of the Gaussian distribution, and then transformed back to the linear scale. Age- and body surface area (BSA)–specific 97th percentiles for Tvol were calculated for boys and girls. The sample included 3529 children evenly divided between boys and girls at each year (x ± SD age: 9.3 ± 1.9 y). The range of median urinary iodine concentrations for the 6 study sites was 118-288 µg/L. There were significant differences in age- and BSA-adjusted mean Tvols between sites, which suggests that population-specific references in countries with long-standing iodine sufficiency may be more accurate than is a single international reference. However, overall differences in age- and BSA-adjusted Tvols between sites were modest relative to the population and measurement variability, which supports the use of a single, site-independent set of references. These new international reference values for Tvol by ultrasound can be used for goiter screening in the context of IDD monitoring. (author's)
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  7. 7
    175537
    Peer Reviewed

    Measuring morbidity in schistosomiasis mansoni: relationship between image pattern, portal vein diameter and portal branch thickness in large-scale surveys using new WHO coding guidelines for ultrasound in schistosomiasis.

    King CH; Magak P; Abdel Salam E; Ouma JH; Kariuki HC; Blanton RE

    Tropical Medicine and International Health. 2003 Feb; 8(2):109-117.

    Objective: World Health Organization consensus meetings on “Ultrasound in Schistosomiasis” in 1996 and 1997 anticipated further challenges in the global implementation of a standardized protocol for morbidity assessment in schistosomiasis mansoni. We evaluated the performance of the qualitative and quantitative components of the new Niamey criteria. Method: Use of the Niamey protocol among 3954 subjects in two linked, cross-sectional ultrasound surveys of Schistosoma mansoni-endemic populations in Egypt and Kenya. Results: There were significant differences between Egyptian and Kenyan sites in prevalence and age distribution of S. mansoni-related hepatic fibrosis (36% vs. 3%, P < 0.001). Protocol image pattern scoring could be performed quickly and was stable to interobserver variation. However, there were unintended but systematic differences between study sites in the measurement of portal vein diameter (PVD) and wall thickness. By Niamey criteria, a high prevalence of portal dilation was scored for normal Egyptian subjects, which reduced the predictive value of image pattern for portal hypertension. Using alternative height-indexing of PVD, image pattern plus PVD findings predicted 15% of Egyptians and 2.5% of Kenyans were at risk for variceal bleeding, whereas locally derived PVD norms estimated 25% of Egyptians and 12% of Kenyans to be at possible risk. Conclusion: Niamey scoring criteria performed acceptably as a relative grading system for disease in schistosomiasis mansoni, but failed to account fully for site-to-site variation in test performance and morbidity prevalence. Consequently, standardized image pattern scoring appears to provide the most useful tool for detection and comparison of S. mansoni-associated morbidity in large-scale surveys. (author's)
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  8. 8
    034719

    Future use of new imaging technologies in developing countries: report of a WHO Scientific Group.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Scientific Group on the Future Use of New Imaging Technologies In Developing Countries

    World Health Organization Technical Report Series. 1985; 1-67.

    This report was prepared by a World Health Organization (WHO) Scientific Group on the Future Use of New Imaging Technologies in Developing Countries, which met in Geneva in 1984 to consider the use of ultrasound and computed tomography. There is increasing demand for both techniques, necessitating careful examination of the costs, medical indications, and types of equipment needed. The primary need in diagnostic imaging is conventional radiology. It is stressed that the use of ultrasound or computed tomography should be considered only when conventional radiology is already available. In addition, neither technique should be considered unless the appropriate specialist physicians are well trained and the resources and manpower are available to provide the necessary treatment and care. Ultrasound is the method of choice for imaging during obstetric examinations, and has almost replaced radiography in this area. This document aims to delineate the conditions under which these 2 new imaging technologies will be of use in developing countries. Toward this end, it outlines the major clinical indications for the use of these techniques and specifies the particular areas where the most benefit can be obtained from their use. The Scientific Group concluded that use of these 2 technical advances confers definite advantages, as long as proper planning and education precede their purchase. In particular, it is noted that purchase of computed tomography equipment will have a significant effect on the total health budget of many countries. Finally, the document reviews all aspects of the specifications and choice of equipment, as well as the type of buildings, education, and maintenance that are essential.
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  9. 9
    090127

    Natural family planning: effective birth control supported by the Catholic Church.

    Ryder RE

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 1993 Sep 18; 307(6906):723-6.

    The Catholic Church approves the use of natural family planning (NFP) methods. Many people think only of the rhythm method when they hear NFP so they perceive NFP methods to be unreliable, unacceptable, and ineffective. They interpret the Catholic Church's approval of these methods as its opposition to birth control. The Billings or cervical mucus method is quite reliable and effective. Rising estrogen levels coincide with increased secretion of cervical mucus, which during ovulation is relatively thin and contains glycoprotein fibrils in a micelle like structure aiding sperm migration. Ultrasonography confirms that the day of most abundant secretion of fertile-type eggs white mucus is the day of ovulation. Once progesterone begins to be secreted, cervical mucus becomes thick and rubbery and acts like a plug in the cervix. Other symptoms associated with ovulation include periovulatory pain and postovulatory rise in basal body temperature. A WHO study of 869 fertile women from Australia, India, Ireland, the Philippines, and El Salvador found 93% could accurately interpret the ovulatory mucus pattern, regardless of education and culture. The probability of pregnancy among women using the cervical mucus method and having intercourse outside the fertile period was .004. The probability of conception increased the closer couples were to the fertile period when they had intercourse (.546 on -3 to -1 peak day and .667 on peak day 0), regardless of education and culture. The failure rate of NFP among mainly poor women in Calcutta, India, equal that of the combined oral contraceptive (0.2/100 women users yearly). Poverty was the motivating factor. NFP costs nothing, is effective (particularly in poverty stricken areas), has no side effects, and grants couples considerable power to control their fertility, indicating the NFP may be the preferred family planning method in developing countries. Prejudices about NFP should be dropped and worldwide dissemination of NFP information should occur.
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