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  1. 1
    049191

    Report of the European Region on Immunization Activities. (Global Advisory Group EPI, Alexandria, October 1984). WHO/Expanded Immunization Programme and the European Immunization Targets in the Framework of HFA 2000.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI]. European Region on Immunization Activities

    [Unpublished] 1984. Presented at the EPI Global Advisory Group Meeting, Alexandria, Egypt, 21-25 October 1984. 3 p. (EPI/GAG/84/WP.4)

    Current reported levels of morbidity and mortality from measles, poliomyelitis, diphtheria, tetanus, and tuberculosis in most countries in the European Region are at or near record low levels. However, several factors threaten successful achievement of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) goal of making immunization services available to all the world's children by the year 2000, including changes in public attitudes as diseases pose less of a visible threat, declining acceptance rates for certain immunizations, variations in vaccines included in the EPI, and incomplete information on the incidence of diseases preventable by immunization and on vaccination coverage rates. To launch a more coordinated approach to the EPI goals, a 2nd Conference on Immunization Policies in Europe is scheduled to be held in Czechoslovakia. Its objectives are: 1) to review and analyze the current situation, including achievements and gaps, in immunization programs in individual countries and the European Region as a whole; 2) to determine the necessary actions to eliminate indigenous measles, poliomyelitis, neonatal tetanus, congenital rubella, and diphtheria; 3) to consider appropriate policies regarding the control by immunization of other diseases of public health importance; 4) to strengthen existing or establish additional systems for effective monitoring and surveillance; 5) to formulate actions necessary to improve national vaccine programs in order to achieve national and regional targets; 6) to reinforce the commitment of Member Countries to the goals and activities of the EPI; and 7) to define appropriate activities for the Regional Office for Europe of the World Health Organization to achieve coordinated action.
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  2. 2
    038952

    Vaccination against tuberculosis. Report of an ICMR/WHO Scientific Group.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Scientific Group on Vaccines Against Tuberculosis

    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES. 1980; (651):1-19.

    This document reports the discussions of a Scientific Group on Vaccination Against Tuberculosis, cosponsored by the Indian Council of Medical Research and the World Health Organization (WHO), that met in 1980. The objectives of the meeting were to review research on Bacillus Calmete-Guerin (BCG) vaccination, assess the present state of knowledge, and determine how to advance this knowledge. Particular emphasis is placed in this document on the trial of BCG vaccines in South India. In this trial, the tuberculin sensitivity induced by BCG vaccination was highly satisfactory at 2 1/2 months but had waned sharply by 2 1/2 years and the 7 1/2-year follow up revealed a high incidence of tuberculous infection in the study population. It is suggested that the protective effect of BCG may depend on epidemiologic, environmental, and immunologic factors affecting both the host and the infective agent. Studies to test certain hypotheses (e.g., the immune response of the study population was unusual, the vaccines were inadequate, the south Indian variant of M tuberculosis acted as an attenuating immunizing agent, and mycobacteria other than M tuberculosis may have partially immunized the study population) are recommended. A detailed analysis should be made when results from the 10-year follow up of the south Indian study population are available.
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  3. 3
    038721

    WHO Expert Committee on Tuberculosis: ninth report.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expert Committee on Tuberculosis

    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES. 1974; (552):1-40.

    This document represents the work of a World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Tuberculosis, which met in Geneva in 1973. Chapters in this volume focus on epidemiology, Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination, case finding and treatment, national tuberculosis programs, research, WHO activities in this field, and the activities of the International Union against Tuberculosis and voluntary groups. The Committee emphasized that tuberculosis still ranks among the world's major health problems, particularly in developing countries. Even in many developed countries, tuberculosis and its sequelae are a more important cause of death than all the other notifiable infectious diseases combined. The previous WHO report, issued in 1964, set forth the concept of a comprehensive tuberculosis control program on a national scale. The implementation of this approach has encountered many problems, including deficiencies in the health infrastructure of many countries (shortages of financial, material, and physical resources and a lack of trained manpower) and resistance to change. However, many countries have instituted comprehensive programs and tuberculosis control has become a widely applied community health activity. A priority will be control of pulmonary tuberculosis. The Committee stressed that national programs must be countrywide, permanent, adapted to the expressed demands of the population, and integrated in the community health structure. Steps involved in setting up such programs include planning and programming, selection of technical policies, implementation, and evaluation. Research priority areas identified by the Committee include epidemiology, bacteriology and immunology, immunization, chemotherpy, the systems analysis approach to tuberculosis control, and training methods and instructional materials.
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  4. 4
    270489

    Local Area Monitoring (LAM).

    Kirsch TD

    WORLD HEALTH STATISTICS QUARTERLY. RAPPORT TRIMESTRIEL DE STATISTIQUES SANITAIRES MONDIALES. 1988; 41(1):19-25.

    Routine surveillance of the incidence of vaccine-preventable diseases has not proved sensitive enough to demonstrate the impact of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) in many countries. In order to document progress since the start of the EPI in 1979, data are needed for several years prior to that. In most developing countries these can be found only in major cities or large hospitals. Therefore a system of sentinel surveillance, the Local Area Monitoring Project (LAM), is being set up in selected institutions in the major cities of the developing world. The primary goal of the LAM project is to provide disease-incidence data of sufficient quality to evaluate more fully the global impact of the EPI on the 6 target diseases--diptheria, pertusis, tetanus, poliomyelitis, measles, and tuberculosis. The goal is to include the major city of each of the 25 largest developing countries, with a total population of 115 million. These 25 countries together account for 85% of all births in the developing world. The program and coverage information is used to assess the impact of individual EPI programs on disease trends. Preliminary analysis of the 12 cities with the best data suggests that the impact of the EPI on the incidence of the target diseases has been greater than previously shown by the routine system. The LAM information is useful for global and regional analysis of program impact, but for the countries themselves its utility may be even greater. It is hoped that the project will help to improve a country's surveillance system by encouraging the use of sentinel reporting as a means of supplementing routine data. The information on the impact of the EPI may further increase political and public support for a program. (Summaries in ENG, FRE)
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