Your search found 10 Results

  1. 1
    375857

    Cervical cancer screening and management of cervical pre-cancers. Training of health staff in colposcopy, LEEP and CKC. Facilitators' guide.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for South-East Asia

    New Delhi, India, WHO, Regional Office for South-East Asia, 2017. 118 p.

    This manual is an instruction guide for facilitators to provide competence based training to providers of colposcopy and treatment services in a cervical cancer screening programme. The training is intended to assist gynaecologists and non-specialist clinicians to learn and improve upon their skills to perform colposcopy and to treat cervical pre-cancers by excision methods. Facilitators are required to consult both the Facilitators’ guide and the Trainees’ handbook while training participants through interactive presentations, group discussions, role plays, clinical practice sessions, etc. The Facilitators’ guide contains detailed training methodologies, structure of the individual training sessions and guidelines for assessment of trainees. The Trainees’ handbook contains different modules to assist trainees with step-by-step learning of colposcopy and treatment procedures. (Excerpt)
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  2. 2
    375855

    Cervical cancer screening and management of cervical pre-cancers. Training of health staff in VIA, HPV detection test and cryotherapy -- Facilitators' guide.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for South-East Asia

    New Delhi, India, WHO, Regional Office for South-East Asia, 2017. 123 p.

    This manual is an instruction guide for facilitators to provide competence based training to providers for screening (with VIA or HPV test) and ablative treatment services in a cervical cancer screening programme. The training is intended to assist midwives, paramedical workers, nurses and clinicians to learn and improve upon their skills to perform counselling, screening tests and treatment. Facilitators are required to consult both the Facilitators’ guide and the Trainees’ handbook while training through interactive presentations, group discussions, role plays, simulated learning sessions, and clinical practice sessions. The Facilitators’ guide contains detailed training methodologies, structure of the individual training sessions, simulated learning sessions and guidelines for assessment of trainees. (Excerpt)
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  3. 3
    374572

    Reporting on gender-based violence in the Syria crisis: facilitator’s guide.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2016 Apr. 78 p.

    This training manual enables a journalist or other trainer to conduct a two- or three-day training workshop. The first part of the curriculum begins with training and group discussion about basic concepts and principles that will help participants develop a clear understanding of the meaning of the term ‘gender-based violence’. The programme continues with detailed information about the consequences of gender-based violence and the survivor support services needed. The trainer will also cover the causes and contributing factors, shining a light on prevention and how best to develop effective prevention strategies. The second part of the curriculum focuses on the ethical principles of reporting on gender-based violence, including what to do and what to avoid. It also includes tips for the journalists to consider during interviews and when to report on gender-based violence related issues.
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  4. 4
    312298

    Strengthening the teaching of tuberculosis control in basic training programmes. A manual for instructors of nurses and other health-care workers.

    Engstrom K

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2006. 95 p. (WHO/HTM/TB/2006.367)

    Approximately one third of the world's population is infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and at risk of developing the disease. Every year, more than 8 million people develop active tuberculosis (TB) and approximately 1.9 million people die. More than 90% of global TB cases and deaths occur in the developing world, where 75% of cases are in the most economically productive age group (15--54 years). Once infected with M. tuberculosis, a person is infected for life. While only 1 in 10 of infected people with healthy immune systems will develop TB symptoms during their lifetimes, infected people with weakened immune systems, such as those with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), are at much greater risk of becoming ill with TB. At the same time, multidrug resistance, which is caused by poorly managed TB treatment, is a growing problem of serious concern in many countries throughout the world. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    300914

    GBV communication skills manual. Communication Skills in Working with Survivors of Gender-based Violence: a five-day training of trainers workshop.

    Family Health International [FHI]; Reproductive Health Response in Conflict Consortium; International Rescue Committee

    [New York, New York], Reproductive Health Response in Conflict Consortium, [2003]. [194] p.

    This curriculum represents collaboration between FHI, the RHRC Consortium, and the IRC. The original curriculum used in Peja, Kosovo, has been supplemented and refined in subsequent trainings by FHI, as well as by the work of IRC's Sophie Read-Hamilton in Tanzania and Sierra Leone. The curriculum presented here has been finalized by Jeanne Ward of the RHRC Consortium, with feedback from FHI and IRC. What follows is an outline of the overall goals of the training, a training outline, and a list of materials needed, as well as a list of transparencies, handouts, and activity sheets used in the training, an indepth training curriculum, and all transparencies, handouts, and activity sheets necessary to conduct a training. The training is designed so that all the materials used in the training can be shared with participants at the end of the workshop (preferably in a binder), and they can conduct subsequent trainings on topics with which they feel comfortable. Participants are not expected to be able to train on the entire contents of the manual unless they have extensive training and psychosocial experience. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    286918

    UNFPA's distance-learning program to expand.

    Abrams T

    Population 2005. 2004 Sep-Oct; 6(3):15.

    The UN Population Fund’s distance-learning courses, directed not only to UNFPA staffs but to workers in the population and development fields worldwide, have been attracting increasing interest and may soon be strengthened and expanded. In a June status report on the purely voluntary program, UNFPA noted that 163 students had already been trained, and that there was a large and growing waiting list of potential participants. Courses are offered in April and October of each year; their descriptive titles are: “The ‘What and Why’ of Reproductive Health;” “Confronting HIV/AIDS: Making a Difference;” “Advocacy: Action, Change and Commitment;” “Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health: How to Deliver Quality Programs and Services?” “Reducing Maternal Deaths: Selecting Priorities, Tracking Progress” (offered in English, French and Spanish). A sixth course, “Mainstreaming Gender: Taking Action, Getting Results,” was introduced this year. A digest of all six courses is currently in production. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    282829

    Training course for the 100% condom use programme.

    Fischer R

    Manila, Philippines, World Health Organization [WHO], Regional Office for the Western Pacific, STI, HIV and AIDS Focus, 2002. [98] p.

    Welcome to this package of training materials, designed to help programme managers and technical staff to implement a 100% condom use programme (100% CUP) in entertainment establishments. The strategy advocated by this training package is based on sound public health thinking, and experience to date with this programme has demonstrated its ability to contribute to a remarkable decline in STI/HIV rates among female sex workers (FSWs). The potential contribution of this approach to public health is now challenging policy-makers and programme managers at all levels to explore the feasibility and methods by which the 100% CUP may be implemented in their jurisdiction. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    274796

    Breastfeeding counselling: a training course. Trainer's guide, part one. Sessions 1-9.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Programme for Control of Diarrhoeal Diseases; UNICEF

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Programme for Control of Diarrhoeal Diseases, 1993. [379] p. (WHO/CDR/93.4; UNICEF/NUT/93.2)

    The International Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes has been in place for more than a decade, and much effort to protect breastfeeding from commercial influences has followed. One requirement for being "Baby Friendly" is that a facility shall not accept or distribute free samples of infant formula. However, even mothers who initiate breastfeeding satisfactorily, often start complementary feeds or stop breastfeeding within a few weeks of delivery. All health workers who care for women and children after the perinatal period have a key role to play in sustaining breastfeeding. Many health workers cannot fulfill this role effectively because they have not been trained to do so. Little time is assigned to breastfeeding counselling and support skills in the preservice curricula of either doctors, nurses or midwives. Hence there is an urgent need to train all health workers who care for mothers and young children, in all countries, in the skills needed to both support and protect breastfeeding. The purpose of "Breastfeeding counselling: A training course" is to help to fill this gap. The materials are designed to make it possible for trainers with limited experience of teaching the subject to conduct up-to-date and effective courses. The concept of `counselling' is new, and the word can be difficult to translate. Some languages use the same word as `advising'. However, counselling means more than simple advising. Often, when you advise people, you tell them what you think they should do. When you counsel a mother, you help her to decide what is best for her, and you help her to develop confidence. You listen to her, and to try to understand how she feels. This course aims to give health workers listening and confidence building skills, so that they can help mothers more effectively. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    274571

    HIV prevention in maternal health services: training guide.

    Perchal P; Mielke E; Kaniauskene A; Verbel LB

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2004. [126] p.

    The goal of this training is to build the capacity of programme managers and staff to address pregnant and postpartum clients’ HIV and STI needs by offering integrated HIV and STI services within their own particular service-delivery setting. The general objectives of this curriculum are to ensure that by the end of the training, the participants will have the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to carry out the following key prevention tasks: 2 Help clients assess their own needs for a range of HIV and STI services, information, and emotional support. 2. Provide clear and correct information appropriate to clients’ identified concerns and needs. 3 Assist clients in making their own voluntary and informed decisions about HIV nad STI risk reduction. 4. Help clients develop the skills they will need to carry out those decisions. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    185834

    Evaluating the impact of the UNFPA regional training program. [Évaluation de l'impact du programme de formation régional du Fonds des Nations Unies pour la Population (UNFPA)]

    Koné H

    In: Training: best practices, lessons learned and future directions. Conference program and session handouts, 22-23 May 2002, [compiled by] JHPIEGO. Baltimore, Maryland, JHPIEGO, 2002 May. 291-306. (USAID Award No. HRN-A-00-98-00041-00)

    In order to cope with the many on-job training needs of population IEC programs in Africa, the UNFPA set up in September 1994, in Abidjan, a Population & Development IEC Regional Training Program for Francophone Africa (PREFICEP). lts aim was to enable a group of nationals in each of the 26 countries (see appendix) to plan, implement and evaluate efficient and culturally-adapted IEC and Pop/FLE projects, in order to contribute to the success of post-ICPD population programs. Target groups include project managers, IEC officers, trainers, Pop/FLE curriculum and teaching material designers. Accordingly, PREFICEP used to organize regional short-term training courses in Ivory Coast. From October 1995 to December 1997, 172 people from 24 countries were trained through 8 courses (see table 1). Each course was evaluated classically: pre-test, weekly evaluation, feedback through their trainees delegates, post-test and final evaluation. The results were utilized to improve the on-going course if possible, future ones. Nevertheless, questions remained about the actual impact of the field training was? To be more precise: at the trainees' level: What has become of them after their training ? How do they utilize what they have learned? Does their performance improve as a result of the training ? Do they continue to use what they have learned from our courses some number of months or years afterward ? Do they feel the need of any post-training support? at the national organizations' level : What is their point of view as employers of former trainees and about their performance? What is the impact of our courses on their organization's activities? How could we better address their needs and concerns at the major training donor level (UNFPA}: How do the field offices perceive our program? How do they see its impact on their national projects or programs? How could we better address their national need? (excerpt)
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