Your search found 85 Results

  1. 1
    391269
    Peer Reviewed

    Prevalence and predictors of late presentation for HIV care in South Africa.

    Fomundam HN; Tesfay AR; Mushipe SA; Mosina MB; Boshielo CT; Nyambi HT; Larsen A; Cheyip M; Getahun A; Pillay Y

    South African Medical Journal. 2017 Nov 27; 107(12):1058-1064.

    Background. Many people living with HIV in South Africa (SA) are not aware of their seropositive status and are diagnosed late during the course of HIV infection. These individuals do not obtain the full benefit from available HIV care and treatment services. Objectives. To describe the prevalence of late presentation for HIV care among newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals and evaluate sociodemographic variables associated with late presentation for HIV care in three high-burden districts of SA. Methods. We used data abstracted from records of 8 138 newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals in 35 clinics between 1 June 2014 and 31 March 2015 to determine the prevalence of late presentation among newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals in selected high-prevalence health districts. Individuals were categorised as ‘moderately late’, ‘very late’ or ‘extremely late’ presenters based on specified criteria. Descriptive analysis was performed to measure the prevalence of late presentation, and multivariate regression analysis was conducted to identify variables independently associated with extremely late presentation. Results. Overall, 79% of the newly diagnosed cases presented for HIV care late in the course of HIV infection (CD4+ count =500 cells/ µL and/or AIDS-defining illness in World Health Organization (WHO) stage III/IV), 19% presented moderately late (CD4+ count 351 -500 cells/µL and WHO clinical stage I or II), 27% presented very late (CD4+ count 201 - 350 cells/µL or WHO clinical stage III), and 33% presented extremely late (CD4+ count =200 cells/µL and/or WHO clinical stage IV) for HIV care. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that males, non-pregnant women, individuals aged >30 years, and those accessing care in facilities located in townships and inner cities were more likely to present late for HIV care. Conclusions. The majority of newly diagnosed HIV-positive individuals in the three high-burden districts (Gert Sibande, uThukela and City of Johannesburg) presented for HIV care late in the course of HIV infection. Interventions that encourage early presentation for HIV care should be prioritised in SA and should target males, non-pregnant women, individuals aged >30 years and those accessing care in facilities located in inner cities and urban townships.
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  2. 2
    323932

    Updated WHO recommendation on tranexamic acid for the treatment of postpartum haemorrhage. Highlights and key messages from the World Health Organization's 2017 Global Recommendation.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Maternal, Newborn, Child and Adolescent Health

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017 Oct. 5 p. (WHO/RHR/17.21)

    This summary brief highlights key messages from the updated World Health Organization’s recommendation on Tranexamic acid (TXA) for the treatment of postpartum haemorrhage (PPH), including policy and program implications for translating the TXA recommendation into action at the country level. In 2012, WHO published recommendations for the prevention and treatment of postpartum haemorrhage, including a recommendation on the use of tranexamic acid (TXA) for treatment of PPH. The 2017 updated WHO Recommendation on TXA is based on new evidence on use of TXA for treatment of PPH. Key messages include: 1) The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends early use of intravenous tranexamic acid (TXA) within 3 hours of birth in addition to standard care for women with clinically diagnosed postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) following vaginal birth or caesarean section; 2) Administration of TXA should be considered as part of the standard PPH treatment package and be administered as soon as possible after onset of bleeding and within 3 hours of birth. TXA for PPH treatment should not be initiated more than 3 hours after birth; 3) TXA should be used in all cases of PPH, regardless of whether the bleeding is due to genital tract trauma or other causes; 4) TXA should be administered at a fixed dose of 1 g in 10 mL (100 mg/mL) IV at 1 mL per minute (i.e., administered over 10 minutes), with a second dose of 1 g IV if bleeding continues after 30 minutes; and 5) TXA should be administered via an IV route only for treatment of PPH. Research on other routes of TXA administration is a priority.This summary brief is intended for policy-makers, programme managers, educators and providers.
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  3. 3
    389069
    Peer Reviewed

    Factors Associated With Extended Breastfeeding in India.

    Mehta AR; Panneer S; Ghosh-Jerath S; Racine EF

    Journal of Human Lactation. 2017 Feb; 33(1):140-148.

    BACKGROUND: Extended breastfeeding duration is common in India. Extended breastfeeding protects the infant from infectious disease and promotes child spacing. In the 1990s, the median breastfeeding duration in India was 24 months. Research aim: This study aimed to investigate the median duration of breastfeeding in India and to identify the factors associated with extended breastfeeding to 24 months as recommended by the World Health Organization. METHODS: This cross-sectional data analysis used nationally representative data from the 2011-2012 Indian Human Development Survey II. The outcome in this study was extended breastfeeding defined as breastfeeding to 24 months or more. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the factors associated with extended breastfeeding. RESULTS: The median duration of breastfeeding was 12 months; approximately 25% of women breastfed 24 months or more. Women were at greater odds of breastfeeding 24 months or more if the infant was a boy compared with a girl, if the women lived in a rural area compared with an urban area, if the women were married at a young age (< 17 vs. 20 years or older at marriage), and if the delivery was assisted by a friend or relative compared with a doctor. CONCLUSION: The median duration of breastfeeding has decreased by 50% from 1992-1993 to 2011-2012. The women who continue to breastfeed 24 months or more tend to be more traditional (i.e., living in rural areas, marrying young, and having family/friends as birth attendants). Further research to study the health effect of decreased breastfeeding duration is warranted.
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  4. 4
    374277

    When will sub-Saharan Africa adopt HIV treatment for all?

    Gupta S; Granich R

    Southern African Journal of HIV Medicine. 2016; 17(1):[6] p.

    Background: The World Health Organization (WHO) HIV treatment guidelines have been used by various countries to revise their national guidelines. Our study discusses the national policy response to the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa and quantifies delays in adopting the WHO guidelines published in 2009, 2013 and 2015. Methods: From the Internet, health authorities and experts, and community members, we collected 59 published HIV guidelines from 33 countries in the sub-Saharan African region, and abstracted dates of publication and antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility criteria. For these 33 countries, representing 97% regional HIV burden in 2015, the number of months taken to adopt the WHO 2009, 2013 and/or 2015 guidelines were calculated to determine the average delay in months needed to publish revised national guidelines. Findings: Of the 33 countries, 3 (6% regional burden) are recommending ART according to the WHO 2015 guidelines (irrespective of CD4 count); 19 (65% regional burden) are recommending ART according to the WHO 2013 guidelines (CD4 count = 500 cells/mm3); and 11 (26% regional burden) according to the WHO 2009 guidelines (CD4 count = 350 cells/mm3). The average time lag to WHO 2009 guidelines adoption in 33 countries was 24 (range 3–56) months. The 22 that have adopted the WHO 2013 guidelines took an average of 10 (range 0–36) months, whilst the three countries that adopted the WHO 2015 guidelines took an average of 8 (range 7–9) months. Conclusion: There is an urgent need to shorten the time lag in adopting and implementing the new WHO guidelines recommending ‘treatment for all’ to achieve the 90-90-90 targets.
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  5. 5
    340407

    Guideline: Updates on HIV and infant feeding. The duration of breastfeeding and support from health services to improve feeding practices among mothers living with HIV.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNICEF

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016. [68] p.

    The objective of this guideline is to improve the HIV-free survival of HIV-exposed infants by providing guidance on appropriate infant feeding practices and use of ARV drugs for mothers living with HIV and by updating WHO-related tools and training materials. The guideline is intended mainly for countries with high HIV prevalence and settings in which diarrhoea, pneumonia and undernutrition are common causes of infant and child mortality. However, it may also be relevant to settings with a low prevalence of HIV depending on the background rates and causes of infant and child mortality. This guideline aims to help Member States and their partners in their efforts to make informed decisions on the appropriate nutrition actions to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, the global targets set in the comprehensive implementation plan on maternal, infant and young child nutrition, the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health (2016-2030) and the Global Health Sector Strategy on Sexually Transmitted Infections 2016-2021. The target audience for this guideline includes: (1) national policy-makers in health ministries; (2) programme managers working in child health, essential drugs and health worker training; (3) health-care providers, researchers and clinicians providing services to pregnant women and mothers living with HIV at various levels of health care; and (4) development partners providing financial and/or technical support for child health programmes, including those in conflict and emergency settings. (Excerpt)
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  6. 6
    366018
    Peer Reviewed

    Early Infant Diagnosis of HIV.

    Chandra J; Yadav D

    Indian Pediatrics. 2015 Apr; 52(4):293-5.

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  7. 7
    386800
    Peer Reviewed

    Antenatal care packages with reduced visits and perinatal mortality: a secondary analysis of the WHO Antenatal Care Trial.

    Vogel JP; Habib NA; Souza JP; Gulmezoglu AM; Dowswell T; Carroli G; Baaqeel HS; Lumbiganon P; Piaggio G; Oladapo OT

    Reproductive Health. 2013; 10:19.

    BACKGROUND: In 2001, the WHO Antenatal Care Trial (WHOACT) concluded that an antenatal care package of evidence-based screening, therapeutic interventions and education across four antenatal visits for low-risk women was not inferior to standard antenatal care and may reduce cost. However, an updated Cochrane review in 2010 identified an increased risk of perinatal mortality of borderline statistical significance in three cluster-randomized trials (including the WHOACT) in developing countries. We conducted a secondary analysis of the WHOACT data to determine the relationship between the reduced visits, goal-oriented antenatal care package and perinatal mortality. METHODS: Exploratory analyses were conducted to assess the effect of baseline risk and timing of perinatal death. Women were stratified by baseline risk to assess differences between intervention and control groups. We used linear modeling and Poisson regression to determine the relative risk of fetal death, neonatal death and perinatal mortality by gestational age. RESULTS: 12,568 women attended the 27 intervention clinics and 11,958 women attended the 26 control clinics. 6,160 women were high risk and 18,365 women were low risk. There were 161 fetal deaths (1.4%) in the intervention group compared to 119 fetal deaths in the control group (1.1%) with an increased overall adjusted relative risk of fetal death (Adjusted RR 1.27; 95% CI 1.03, 1.58). This was attributable to an increased relative risk of fetal death between 32 and 36 weeks of gestation (Adjusted RR 2.24; 95% CI 1.42, 3.53) which was statistically significant for high and low risk groups. CONCLUSION: It is plausible the increased risk of fetal death between 32 and 36 weeks gestation could be due to reduced number of visits, however heterogeneity in study populations or differences in quality of care and timing of visits could also be playing a role. Monitoring maternal, fetal and neonatal outcomes when implementing antenatal care protocols is essential. Implementing reduced visit antenatal care packages demands careful monitoring of maternal and perinatal outcomes, especially fetal death.
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  8. 8
    340671

    Guideline on when to start antiretroviral therapy and on pre-exposure prophylaxis for HIV.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2015 Sep. [78] p. (Guidelines)

    This early-release guideline makes available two key recommendations that were developed during the revision process in 2015. First, antiretroviral therapy (ART) should be initiated in everyone living with HIV at any CD4 cell count. Second, the use of daily oral pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is recommended as a prevention choice for people at substantial risk of HIV infection as part of combination prevention approaches. The first of these recommendations is based on evidence from clinical trials and observational studies released since 2013 showing that earlier use of ART results in better clinical outcomes for people living with HIV compared with delayed treatment. The second recommendation is based on clinical trial results confirming the efficacy of the ARV drug tenofovir for use as PrEP to prevent people from acquiring HIV in a wide variety of settings and populations. The recommendations in this guideline will form part of the revised consolidated guidelines on the use of ARV drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection to be published by WHO in 2016. The full update of the guidelines will consist of comprehensive clinical recommendations together with revised operational and service delivery guidance to support implementation.
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  9. 9
    337913

    Guideline: Delayed umbilical cord clamping for improved maternal and infant health and nutrition outcomes.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2014. [38] p.

    This guideline is a derivative product from existing World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations on umbilical cord clamping for improving maternal and infant outcomes. The optimal timing of umbilical cord clamping has been debated in the scientific literature for at least a century, and the timing of cord clamping continues to vary according to clinical policy and practice. “Early” cord clamping is generally carried out in the first 60 seconds after birth (most commonly in the first 15-30 seconds), whereas “delayed” (also referred to as “late”) cord clamping is generally carried out more than 1 min after the birth or when the umbilical cord pulsation has ceased. For the mother, delayed cord clamping is one of the actions included in a package for reduction of the risk of postpartum haemorrhage. Member States have requested guidance from WHO on the effects of delayed cord clamping for improving maternal and infant nutrition and health, as a public health strategy in support of their efforts to achieve the Millennium Development Goals, in particular, reduction of child mortality (MDG 4) and improvement of maternal health (MDG 5), as well as the global targets set in the Comprehensive implementation plan on maternal, infant and young child nutrition. The guideline is intended for a wide audience, including policy-makers; their expert advisers; technical and programme staff at organizations involved in the design, implementation and scaling-up of nutrition actions for public health; and health staff providing care to mothers and their infants. (Excerpt)
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  10. 10
    382783
    Peer Reviewed

    Individualizing the WHO HIV and infant feeding guidelines: optimal breastfeeding duration to maximize infant HIV-free survival.

    Ciaranello AL; Leroy V; Rusibamayila A; Freedberg KA; Shapiro R; Engelsmann B; Lockman S; Kelly KA; Dabis F; Walensky RP

    AIDS. 2014 Jul; 28 Suppl 3:S287-99.

    OBJECTIVES: To determine how infant feeding recommendations can maximize HIV-free survival (HFS) among HIV-exposed, uninfected African infants, balancing risks of breast milk-associated HIV infection with setting-specific risks of illness and death associated with replacement feeding. DESIGN: Validated mathematical model of HIV-exposed, uninfected infants, with published data from Africa. METHODS: We projected 24-month HFS using combinations of: maternal CD4, antiretroviral drug availability, and relative risk of mortality among replacement-fed compared to breastfed infants ('RR-RF', range 1.0-6.0). For each combination, we identified the 'optimal' breastfeeding duration (0-24 months) maximizing HFS. We compared HFS under an 'individualized' approach, based on the above parameters, to the WHO 'public health approach' (12 months breastfeeding for all HIV-infected women). RESULTS: Projected HFS was 65-93%. When the value of RR-RF is 1.0, replacement feeding from birth maximized HFS. At a commonly reported RR-RF value (2.0), optimal breastfeeding duration was 3-12 months, depending on maternal CD4 and antiretroviral drug availability. As the value of RR-RF increased, optimal breastfeeding duration increased. Compared to the public health approach, an individualized approach improved absolute HFS by less than 1% if RR-RF value was 2.0-4.0, by 3% if RR-RF value was 1.0 or 6.0, and by greater amounts if access to antiretroviral drugs was limited. CONCLUSION: Tailoring breastfeeding duration to maternal CD4, antiretroviral drug availability, and local replacement feeding safety can optimize HFS among HIV-exposed infants. An individualized approach leads to moderate gains in HFS, but only when mortality risks from replacement feeding are very low or very high, or antiretroviral drug availability is limited. The WHO public health approach is beneficial in most resource-limited settings.
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  11. 11
    362416
    Peer Reviewed

    Antiretroviral therapy needs: the effect of changing global guidelines.

    Stanecki K; Daher J; Stover J; Beusenberg M; Souteyrand Y; Garcia Calleja JM

    Sexually Transmitted Infections. 2010 Dec; 86 Suppl 2:ii62-6.

    BACKGROUND: In 2010 the WHO issued a revision of the guidelines on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV infection in adults and adolescents. The recommendations included earlier diagnosis and treatment of HIV in the interest of a longer and healthier life. The current analysis explores the impact on the estimates of treatment needs of the new criteria for initiating ART compared with the previous guidelines. METHODS: The analyses are based on the national models of HIV estimates for the years 1990-2009. These models produce time series estimates of ART treatment need and HIV-related mortality. The ART need estimates based on ART eligibility criteria promoted by the 2010 WHO guidelines were compared with the need estimates based on the 2006 WHO guidelines. RESULTS: With the 2010 eligibility criteria, the proportion of people living with HIV currently in need of ART is estimated to increase from 34% to 49%. Globally, the need increases from 11.4 million (10.2-12.5 million) to 16.2 million (14.8-17.1 million). Regional differences include 7.4 million (6.4-8.4 million) to 10.6 million (9.7-11.5 million) in sub-Saharan Africa, 1.6 million (1.3-1.7 million) to 2.4 million (2.1-2.5 million) in Asia and 710 000 (610 000-780 000) to 950 000 (810 000-1.0 million) in Latin America and the Caribbean. CONCLUSIONS: When adopting the new recommendations, countries have to adapt their planning process in order to accelerate access to life saving drugs to those in need. These recommendations have a significant impact on resource needs. In addition to improving and prolonging the lives of the infected individuals, it will have the expected benefit of reducing HIV transmission and the future HIV/AIDS burden.
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  12. 12
    333280

    From paper to practice. Implementing the World Health Organization’s 2010 Antiretroviral Therapy Recommendations for Adults and Adolescents in Zambia.

    Bolton C; Topp S; Rossi V; Ojikutu B

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow [JSI], AIDS Support and Technical Assistance Resources [AIDSTAR-One], 2011 May. [12] p. (USAID Contract No. GHH-I-00-07-00059-00; AIDSTAR-One Case Study Series)

    After the 2009 release of WHO’s Rapid Advice for HIV treatment in adults and adolescents, Zambia launched a broad-based effort to update its national treatment protocols. The Ministry of Health succeeded in creating an efficient and inclusive review and revision process for the guidelines, which they began implementing in 2011.
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  13. 13
    339252
    Peer Reviewed

    Controversies in postpartum contraception: when is it safe to start oral contraceptives after childbirth?

    Jackson E

    Thrombosis Research. 2011; 127(Suppl 3):S35-S39.

    The timely initiation of contraception postpartum is an important consideration for breastfeeding and non-breastfeeding women; many women prefer oral contraceptive pills to other methods. In breastfeeding women, combined hormonal pills are not recommended prior to 6 weeks postpartum, due to effects on milk production. Although progestogen-only pills do not adversely affect milk, lack of data regarding possible effects on infants exposed to progestogens in breast milk renders timing of initiation of this method controversial. In non-breastfeeding women, elevated risk of venous thromboembolism restricts use of combined hormonal pills prior to 21 days postpartum. From 21 to 42 days, use of combined hormonal pills should be assessed based on a woman's personal venous thromboembolism risk profile; after 42 days postpartum there is no restriction in the use of combined hormonal pills for otherwise healthy women. Non-breastfeeding women may safely use progestogen-only pills at any time during the postpartum.
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  14. 14
    346727

    Monitoring antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: balancing clinical care, technology, and human resources.

    Hosseinipour MC; Schechter M

    Current HIV / AIDS Reports. 2010 Aug; 7(3):168-74.

    Due to the rapid expansion of first-line antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings (RLS), increasing numbers of people are living with HIV for prolonged periods of time. Treatment programs must now decide how to balance monitoring costs necessary to maximize health benefits for those already on treatment with the continued demand to initiate more patients on first-line treatment. We review currently available evidence related to monitoring strategies in RLS and discuss their implications on timing of switching to second-line treatment, development of HIV resistance, and clinical outcome.
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  15. 15
    345122
    Peer Reviewed

    Ulipristal acetate for emergency contraception?

    Piaggio G; von Hertzen H

    Lancet. 2010 May 8; 375(9726):1607-8; author reply 1608.

    This author's reply defends their report on a randomized non-inferiority trial to compare the efficacy and safety of ulipristal acetate with levonorgestrel for emergency contraception. It concludes that there is good evidence that ulipristal acetate is much more effective than levonorgestrel at preventing ovulation at the time in the cycle when conception is most likely to occur.
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  16. 16
    339653

    Rapid advice: antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection in adults and adolescents.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2009 Nov. 25 p.

    Based on the latest scientific evidence, the World Health Organization (WHO) has released new recommendations on HIV treatment and prevention and infant feeding in the context of HIV. WHO now recommends earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy for adults and adolescents, the delivery of more patient-friendly antiretroviral drugs (ARVs), and prolonged use of ARVs to reduce the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. For the first time, WHO recommends that HIV-positive mothers or their infants take ARVs while breastfeeding to prevent HIV transmission.
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  17. 17
    331727

    USAID-supported research influences international family planning guidelines.

    Family Health International [FHI]

    [Research Triangle Park, North Carolina], FHI, [2008]. [2] p. (Research Brief on Hormonal Contraception)

    The World Health Organization has changed its recommendation on the timing of re-injection for depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA). The new guidelines encourage health care providers to allow a longer grace period for a woman to return for her next injection of this popular hormonal contraceptive.
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  18. 18
    342344

    Early treatment of HIV: implications for resource-limited settings.

    Hobbs CV; Essajee SM

    Current Opinion In HIV and AIDS. 2009 May; 4(3):222-31.

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We review the current literature supporting adoption of higher CD4 thresholds for initiation of antiretroviral treatment and survey progress in adoption of early treatment policies in resource-limited settings. We highlight some of the challenges and opportunities implementation of early treatment will bring. RECENT FINDINGS: The initial success of combination antiretroviral treatment resulted in the recommendation to treat early all individuals with HIV. However, the gradual realization that antiretroviral treatment was associated with toxicity led to a more tempered approach. Recent cohort studies and some clinical trials have shown that delaying treatment is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. SUMMARY: Early treatment is routinely practiced in developed countries. Now, early treatment is being adopted as a strategy in many resource-limited settings. The implications of this policy shift are not known, but we predict early treatment will have important consequences for the health system, the individual, and the community. Whereas these consequences will bring significant challenges, the increased numbers of HIV-infected individuals on treatment will result in many new opportunities - antiretroviral treatment will become less expensive, systems to deliver chronic care will be strengthened, and the policy shift will focus greater attention on pregnant women and children. Finally, some authors postulate that early treatment may impact HIV transmission.
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  19. 19
    331138
    Peer Reviewed

    Trends in infant nutrition in Saudi Arabia: compliance with WHO recommendations.

    El Mouzan MI; Al Omar AA; Al Salloum AA; Al Herbish AS; Qurachi MM

    Annals of Saudi Medicine. 2009 Jan-Feb; 29(1):20-3.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: The WHO recommends exclusive breastfeeding in the first 6 months of life. Our objective was to evaluate trends in infant nutrition in Saudi Arabia and the degree of compliance with WHO recommendations. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A nationwide nutritional survey of a sample of Saudi households was selected by the multistage probability sampling procedure. A validated questionnaire was administered to mothers of children less than 3 years of age. RESULTS: Of 5339 children in the sample, 4889 received breast milk at birth indicating a prevalence of initiation of 91.6%. Initiation of breastfeeding was delayed beyond 6 hours after birth in 28.1% of the infants. Bottle feeding was introduced by 1 month of age to 2174/4260 (51.4%) and to 3831/4260 (90%) by 6 months of age. The majority of infants 3870/4787 (80.8%) were introduced to "solid foods" between 4 to 6 months of age and whole milk feedings were given to 40% of children younger than 12 months of age. CONCLUSIONS: The current practice of feeding of Saudi infants is very far from compliance with even the most conservative WHO recommendations of exclusive breastfeeding for 4 to 6 months. The high prevalence of breastfeeding initiation at birth indicates the willingness of Saudi mothers to breastfeed. However, early introduction of complementary feedings reduced the period of exclusive breastfeeding. Research in infant nutrition should be a public health priority to improve the rate of breastfeeding and to minimize other inappropriate practices.
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  20. 20
    329253
    Peer Reviewed

    Outcome of severely malnourished children treated according to UNICEF 2004 guidelines: a one-year experience in a zone hospital in rural Ethiopia.

    Berti A; Bregani ER; Manenti F; Pizzi C

    Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2008 Sep; 102(9):939-44.

    Malnutrition still has a dramatic impact on childhood mortality in sub-Saharan African countries. Very few studies have tried to evaluate the outcome of severely malnourished children treated according to the UNICEF 2004 guidelines and reported fatality rates are still very high. During 2006, 1635 children were admitted to the paediatric ward of St. Luke Catholic Hospital in Wolisso, South West Shewa, Ethiopia. Four hundred and ninety-three (30.15%) were severely malnourished and were enrolled in the study. We reviewed the registration books and inpatient charts to analyze their outcome. A mortality rate of 7.1% was found, which is significantly lower than reported in the literature. 28.6% of deaths occurred within 48 h of admission; the recovery rate was 88.4%; the drop-out rate was 4.5%. Early deaths were due to the poor condition of the children on admission, leading to failure of treatment. Late mortality was considered to be related to electrolyte imbalances, which we were unable to measure. The clinical skills of nursing and medical staff were considered an important factor in improving the outcome of malnourished patients. We found that proper implementation of WHO guidelines for the hospital treatment of severely malnourished children can lead to a relatively low mortality rate, especially when good clinical monitoring is assured.
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  21. 21
    325889
    Peer Reviewed

    Which aspects of non-clinical quality of care are most important? Results from WHO's general population surveys of "health systems responsiveness" in 41 countries.

    Valentine N; Darby C; Bonsel GJ

    Social Science and Medicine. 2008 May; 66(9):1939-1950.

    Quality of care research has reached some agreement on concepts like structure, process and outcome, and non-clinical versus clinical processes of care. These concepts are commonly explored through surveys measuring patient experiences, yet few surveys have focused on patient, or "user", priorities across different quality dimensions. Population surveys on priorities can contribute to, although not replace participation in, policy decision making. Using 105,806 survey interview records from the World Health Organization's (WHO's) general population surveys in 41 countries, this paper describes the relative importance of eight domains in the non-clinical quality of care concept WHO calls "health systems responsiveness". Responsiveness domains are divided into interpersonal domains (dignity, autonomy, communication and confidentiality) and structural domains (quality of basic amenities, choice, access to social support networks and prompt attention). This paper explores variations in domain importance by country-level variables (country of residence, human development, health system expenditure, and "geographic zones") and by subpopulations defined by sex, age, education, health status, and utilization. Most respondents selected prompt attention as the most important domain. Dignity was selected second, followed by communication. Access to social support networks was identified as the least important domain. In general, convergence in rankings was stronger across subpopulations within countries than across countries. Yet even across diverse countries, there was more convergence than divergence in views. These results provide a ranking of quality of care criteria for consideration during health reform processes further to the usual emphasis on clinical quality and supply-side efficiency. (author's)
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  22. 22
    312831

    Levonorgestrel alone for emergency contraception.

    Contraception Report. 1999 Jan; 9(6):[4] p..

    A recent WHO-sponsored study has demonstrated that the progestin levonorgestrel, used alone, is a highly effective and well-tolerated form of emergency contraception. With the proportion of pregnancies prevented up to 95% - depending on the timeliness of administration - the levonorgestrel regimen proved more effective than the most commonly used regimen, the Yuzpe method. The Yuzpe method employs a dual-hormone (ethinyl estradiol plus levonorgestrel) approach to preventing pregnancy. Despite the Yuzpe regimen's 75% efficacy rate (a weighted average from 10 studies) the method has been associated with drawbacks. About 50% of users experience nausea and 20% report vomiting, which can reduce patient compliance. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    307408
    Peer Reviewed

    Comparison of three single doses of mifepristone as emergency contraception: a randomised controlled trial.

    Jin J; Weisberg E; Fraser IS

    Australian and New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 2005 Dec; 45(6):489-494.

    This is an analysis of the Australian component of a large World Health Organization multicentre dose-finding study of mifepristone for emergency contraception and the first clinical study of this controversial drug in Australia. The aims were to compare the effectiveness and side-effects of three single doses of mifepristone taken within 120 h after unprotected coitus as emergency contraception. Design: Double-blind, randomised controlled trial. One hundred fifty healthy women with regular menstrual cycles who requested emergency contraception. Participants were allocated randomly to one of the three doses (10, 50 and 600 mg). The primary outcome was confirmed pregnancy, and secondary outcome measures included side-effects and delay in the onset of the next menses. Pregnancy rates for mifepristone 10, 50 and 600 mg were 2.0, 2.1 and 2.1%, respectively, with no significant difference between groups. No major side-effects occurred, except an unpredictable delay in the onset of the next menses. Mifepristone 600 mg caused a significantly longer delay in the onset of the next menses than either the 10 or the 50 mg dose. Lowering the dose of mifepristone from 600 to 10 mg did not significantly impair its effectiveness as an emergency contraceptive, and caused less delay in the onset of the next menses. Therefore, a dose as low as 10 mg may be preferable to 600 mg for emergency contraception. This is very much lower than the dose required to terminate a pregnancy. (author's)
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  24. 24
    302774
    Peer Reviewed

    The quality of HIV/AIDS case-detection and case-reporting systems in Mozambique.

    Chilundo B; Sahay S; Sundby J

    African Journal of AIDS Research. 2004 Nov; 3(2):145-155.

    Despite the underlying importance of surveillance systems for the management of HIV/AIDS prevention and control programmes, there has been limited analysis of the quality of HIV/AIDS case-detection and case-reporting systems, beginning with peripheral facilities through to those at national levels. In Mozambique, HIV cases are generally correctly detected despite some unreliable use of test kits beyond their expiry date, uneven distribution of test kits among facilities, frequent disregard for bio-safety measures and irregular external quality assessment. Furthermore, HIV/AIDS case-reporting is compromised by poor data quality, including under-reporting and discrepancies across different reporting channels and organisational levels, as well as a lack of standardised data forms, data items collected and report formats. Our analysis of HIV/AIDS surveillance systems in Mozambique leads to the following key recommendations: (1) a strengthening and standardisation of both the case-detection and case-reporting systems at all levels; (2) the regular training of staff at peripheral facilities, to allow for better testing and improved local data analysis, validation and interpretation; (3) the redesign of reporting systems for blood banks, including integration of the AIDS case-reporting subsystems into one; and (4) the use of baseline data as a foundation for more comprehensive analysis across the country, in response to UNAIDS advice regarding second-generation HIV surveillance. (author's)
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  25. 25
    302235
    Peer Reviewed

    Breast feeding practices in rural Lucknow.

    Verma R; Mohan U; Srivastava VK; Sujata

    Indian Journal of Community Medicine. 2006 Jun; 31(2):65.

    WHO and other international agencies has recommended that mother should breast feed the children exclusively for 4-6 month from birth and continue breast feeding along with appropriate supplemental food up to second year. Breast feeding should be initiated within an hour of birth instead of waiting several hours as is often customary. Although there is little milk at that time, it helps to establish feeding and a close mother-child relationship, known as "bonding". A community based study was conducted in the area of Experimental Teaching Health Sub Centres, Mati and Banthra under the Rural Health Training Centre, Sarojini Nagar, Department of community Medicine, K, G. Medical University, Lucknow. 200 lactating mothers were interviewed using a pre tested proforma to collect information regarding sociodemographic characteristics, current feeding practices, time of initiation of breast feeding and colostrum given to the new borns. (excerpt)
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