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Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    650019

    The biochemistry and microbiology of the female and male genital tracts: report of a WHO Scientific Group.

    WHO SCIENTIFIC GROUP

    Geneva, World Health Organization, 1965. (World Health Organization Technical Report Series No. 313.) 15 p.

    A WHO Scientific Group on the Biochemistry and Microbiology of the Female and Male Genital Tracts met in Geneva on April 20-26, 1965. It was the sixth of a series of meetings giving detailed consideration to the biology of human reproduction. Topics investigated included: 1) the chemistry and enzymology of the uterus; 2) sperm transport; 3) capacitation and the acrosome reaction; 4) nidation and placentation; 5) the chemistry and enzymology of semen; 6) the effects of cadmium, zinc, and selenium compounds on reproduction; and 7) microbiology. The Group considered that many of the subjects discussed required further investigation. The discussions repeatedly indicated the need for more broadly based comparative studies in the physiology of reproduction. They also underlined the need for more extensive studies in primates, particularly with a view to determining the time of ovulation and the reaction of uterine tissues to the changing stages of the cycle and of pregnancy. The importance of viewing the male and female components in reproduction as an integrated whole rather than as isolated events was stressed.
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  2. 2
    083775

    WHO laboratory manual for the examination of human semen and sperm-cervical mucus interaction. 3rd ed.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction

    Cambridge, England, Cambridge University Press, 1992. viii, 107 p.

    In 1992, WHO's special program of research, development and research training in human reproduction updated its laboratory manual for the examination of human semen and sperm-cervical mucus interaction because the field of andrology continues to progress quickly and there is heightened realization of the need for standardized measurement of all semen variables. This manual is designed to mainly serve the needs of researchers and clinicians in developing countries. Chapter 2 addresses laboratory procedures that are minimal essential steps for semen evaluation, optional procedures, and procedures needing additional evaluation, such as computer-aided sperm analysis used to measure sperm motion (i.e., research tools). The Shorr stain has replaced the Papanicolaou stain. Measurements of acid phosphatase and neutral alpha-glucosidase were added, while the measurement of adenosine triphosphatase was excluded. Few changes between the 2nd and 3rd editions occurred in Chapter 3. Chapters 4 and 5 are rather brief but discuss interlaboratory and technical standardization procedures. New appendices present safety guidelines and basic requirements for the andrology laboratory.
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  3. 3
    077662

    WHO laboratory manual for the examination of human semen and semen-cervical mucus interaction. 2nd ed.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction

    Cambridge, England, Cambridge University Press, 1987. [7], 67 p.

    The WHO Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction has revised its manual designed to standardize procedures for the examination of human semen. This revised manual, for instance, describes a simplified method for screening the morphology of cellular elements other than spermatozoa; the previous method now appears in the section on optional procedures. WHO has also included methods to determine the presence of spermatozoa antibodies. The manual has guidelines on measurement of biochemical components of seminal plasma to evaluate the secretory function of accessory glands (e.g., fructose indicates secretory function of the seminal vesicles). Even though these biochemical tests may not mark a man's fertility, they demonstrate the functional state of these glands. Besides, someday they may even help assess the possible effects of xenobiotic factors and of disease. Some researchers believe adenosine triphosphate levels are linked to spermatozoal function and that the zona free hamster oocyte test can determine the ability of human spermatozoa to join with the oocyte; so WHO has listed protocols for these 2 tests. The manual also has protocols to assess the ability of spermatozoa to penetrate cervical mucus in vitro: the microscopic method and the capillary tube test. WHO believes that determining this ability is important when evaluating the fertility of a couple. The Standard Procedures section on collection and examination of human semen considers appearance, volume, consistency, pH, motility, preparation and grading, agglutination, sperm viability, sperm count, and testing for antibody-coating of spermatozoa. The section on sperm cervical mucus interaction examines volume, consistency, ferning, spinnbarkeit, cellularity, pH, and in vivo and in vitro tests. It hopes that researchers will adapt the standard procedures presented in this manual to improve quality control between laboratories and allow aggregation of data from several sources for analysis.
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  4. 4
    782755

    Contraceptive development.

    BIALY G

    CRP Population Research. 1978 Nov; 33-34.

    The Contraceptive Development Branch (CDB) program conducts research in 2 areas: 1) reproductive processes and 2) product development. Research on reproductive processes improved the understanding of gamete transport and has better identified corpus luteum functions and the role of prostaglandins. The biology and biochemistry of the ovum has been studied, and in vitro fertilization investigated. The mechanism of spermatogenesis, sperm maturation, and subsequent fertilization have been observed. Moreover, CDB has participated in the distribution of a variety of reagents to the scientific community, to stimulate research on the antipregnancy vaccine. In the area of product development, the CDB continues experimenting with the synthesis of new chemicals to regulate human fertility, the issue of safety being the primary motivation of the program. Approximately 1100 new chemicals have been synthesized and tested on laboratory animals. A drug testing program was initiated in 1972, providing feedback of biological data, and representing the major drug testing effort in the U.S. Considerable progress has been made in the area of implantable and oral contraceptives, and in the area of devices for fertility regulation, and for sexual sterilization. Clinical studies sponsored by CDB are ongoing.
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  5. 5
    776180

    The investigation of the infertile couple: a critique of the currently available diagnostic tests.

    NEWTON JR

    In: Diczfalusy, E., ed. Regulation of human fertility. (Proceedings of the WHO Symposium on Advances in Fertility Regulation, Moscow, USSR, November 16-19, 1976) Copenhagan, Denmark, Scriptor, 1977. p. 111-134

    A 6-month regimen for managing infertile men and/or women ideally forms 4 stages: 1) history and examination of the couple; 2) confirmation of ovulation, compatibility of sperm and mucus, and seminology; 3) tests for tubal patency; and 4) detailed endocrine tests for abnormalities found in Stages 1-3. Medical history should include emotional stress and work pressures, if any. Ovulation confirmation requires 2 tests combined from these 4: 1) basal body temperature; 2) endometrial biopsy; 3) blood progesterone levels; and 4) urinary pregnanediol. These procedures are outlined in detail, and figures chart body temperature variations and expected progesterone and pregnanediol levels. Assessment of cervical mucus and measurement of sperm penetration combine in vitro and in vivo tests. The Sims-Huhner test (postcoital test), though not standardized, is used to analyze sperm-mucus interaction by quantitative scoring of sperm count and motility. Other in vitro tests are the sperm-mucus match test and the fractional postcoital test (both described). Tubal patency is investigated by tubal insufflation with CO2, hysterosalpingography, endoscopy, and laparoscopy. Additional Stage 4 tests include vaginal cytology and assessment of estrogen and progesterone effects.
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  6. 6
    755635

    Bibliography on human reproduction, family planning and population dynamics: annotated articles and unpublished work in the South-East Asia Region: male reproduction and Fertility Control (including review of current status).

    WHITE IG

    New Delhi, India, World Health Organization, Regional Office for South-East Asia, April 1975. (Special Supplement No. 3) 119 p

    This annotated bibliography focusses on male reproduction and fertility control. A review of current status covers 7 broad categories of information: 1) the testis; 2) accessory sexual glands; 3) semen; 4) factors affecting the sperm in vitro; 5) interference with testicular function; 6) interference with sperm in the epididymis; and 7) current methods of male contraception. The opening section lists source materials for testis and spermatogenesis, epididymis and other accessory organs; composition of semen; spermatozoa; effects of steroid and nonsteroid compounds; vasectomy and contraceptive techniques; immunological aspects; and infertility. Sample titles are "Fructose and citric acid in human semen," and "Studies with sub-tropic doses of oc-chlorohydrin in the male monkey.""
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