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  1. 1
    158412

    Focusing resources on effective school health: a FRESH start to improving the quality and equity of education.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNESCO; UNICEF; World Bank; Education International

    [Unpublished] [2000] [8] p.

    In April, 2000, a session was jointly organized by several international agencies at the World Education Forum in Dakar, Senegal. It aimed to raise the education sector's awareness of the value of implementing an effective school health, hygiene and nutrition program as one of its major strategies to achieve Education for All. This paper presents information that is the foundation and reasoning behind the participating agencies' willingness to join in partnership in Focusing Resources on Effective School Health. Information in this paper will help make a strong case that an effective school health program responds to a new need, increases the efficacy of other investments in child development, ensures better educational outcomes, achieves greater social equity, and is a highly cost effective strategy. The information can also be used to clearly argue why the basic components of a school health program should be made available together. Finally, it provides concise and sound reasons that can be used to foster effective partnerships between education and health sectors, teachers and health workers, schools and community groups, and pupils and persons responsible for school health programs.
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  2. 2
    106648

    School health education to prevent AIDS and STD. A resource package for curriculum planners. Teachers' guide.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNESCO

    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, WHO, 1994. [3], 117 p. (WHO/GPA/TCO/PRV/94.6c)

    This manual--part of a three-volume resource package prepared by WHO and UNESCO to guide the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) education programs for students 12-16 years of age--presents guidelines for teachers. The overall goal of AIDS education is to promote behaviors that prevent the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) through the learning of behavioral and communication skills. The educational program is comprised of four units: basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS/STDs, responsible behavior: delaying sexual intercourse, responsible behavior: protected sex, and care and support for people with AIDS. 53 student activities have been developed to support this curriculum; most are based on a participatory approach and present hypothetical situations of relevance to the lives of young people. Detailed information is provided for teachers on the rationale for this curriculum, seven appropriate teaching methods, creating a classroom atmosphere that promotes openness and acceptance, use of peer leaders, participation of parents and family members, test items for student evaluation, and typical questions about HIV/AIDS/STDs. In addition, the teacher's role in each of the student activities is described. Two companion volumes focus on guidelines for curriculum planners and the student activities.
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  3. 3
    106649

    School health education to prevent AIDS and STD. A resource package for curriculum planners. Students' activities.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNESCO

    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, WHO, 1994. [3], 79 p. (WHO/GPA/TCO/PRV/94.6b)

    This manual--part of a three-volume resource package designed by WHO and UNESCO to guide the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) education for students aged 12-16 years--presents 53 student activities for use in such a program. The goal of AIDS education is to promote behavior that prevents the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The proposed program is comprised of four units: basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS/STDs, responsible behavior: delaying sexual intercourse, responsible behavior: protected sex, and care and support for those with AIDS. At completion, students should be able to differentiate between HIV, AIDS, and STDs; identify modes of HIV transmission; rank methods of HIV/STD prevention for effectiveness; identify sources of help in the community; discuss reasons for delaying sexual intercourse or, if already sexually active, using condoms; respond assertively to pressures to have sexual intercourse or unprotected sex; identify ways of showing compassion for those with HIV/AIDS; and care for people with AIDS in the family and community. The activity sheets include comic-style graphics that illustrate hypothetical situations and examples of pro-active AIDS-related behaviors; the emphasis is on participatory education, known to be most effective for the teaching of behavioral skills to young people. Two companion volumes focus on guidelines for curriculum planners and teachers.
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  4. 4
    106650

    School health education to prevent AIDS and STD. A resource package for curriculum planners. Handbook for curriculum planners.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNESCO

    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, WHO, 1994. [3], 88 p. (WHO/GPA/TCO/PRV/94.6a)

    The effort to provide young people with school-based acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) education has been hindered in many cases by a lack of examples of curricula, learning materials, and classroom activities. To overcome this obstacle, WHO and UNESCO have prepared a resource package for the teaching of behavioral skills to reduce the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission among young people ages 12-16 years. This manual, intended for curriculum planners, outlines an educational model comprised of four units: basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, reasons for and communication skills germane to delaying sexual intercourse, information on condom use, and care and compassion for people with AIDS. Included are guidelines on the 10 steps in developing an AIDS education curriculum--situation assessment, defining the type of program, selecting objectives, the curriculum plan, planning for material production, developing student activities, developing the teachers' guide, validating the curriculum, teacher training, and program evaluation, sample materials for teacher training and introducing the curriculum to parents, and instruments for program evaluation. It is stressed that AIDS education is most effective when supported by community involvement and integrated into existing health, sex, or family life education programs. Two companion volumes focus on student activities and guidelines for teachers.
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