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  1. 1
    136174

    Sexual health education does lead to safer sexual behaviour. UNAIDS review. Press release.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1997 Oct 22. 3 p. (UNAIDS Presse Release)

    A review commissioned by the Joint UN Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) found that sexual health education for children and youth promotes safer sexual behavior and does not increase their sexual activity. Examined were 68 reports on sexual health and HIV/AIDS prevention education from France, Mexico, Switzerland, several Nordic countries, the UK, and the US. In most cases, studies compared indicators such as adolescent pregnancy rates, sexually transmitted disease (STD) infection rates, and self-reported sexual activity in youth who were exposed to educational interventions and those who were not. Only three studies (all of which had serious methodological problems) found an association between sexual health education and increased sexual interaction. 22 studies reported that HIV and/or sexual health education either delayed the age at onset of sexual activity, reduced the number of sexual partners, or reduced unplanned pregnancy and STD rates. Characteristics of programs that succeeded in not only increasing knowledge but also producing behavioral change included the following: a focused curriculum with clear statements about behavioral aims, clear delineation of the risks of unprotected sex and methods to avoid them, attention to social and media influences on sexual behavior, practice in sexual communication and negotiation skills, encouragement of openness about sex, and a grounding in theories emphasizing the social nature of learning.
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  2. 2
    106648

    School health education to prevent AIDS and STD. A resource package for curriculum planners. Teachers' guide.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNESCO

    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, WHO, 1994. [3], 117 p. (WHO/GPA/TCO/PRV/94.6c)

    This manual--part of a three-volume resource package prepared by WHO and UNESCO to guide the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) education programs for students 12-16 years of age--presents guidelines for teachers. The overall goal of AIDS education is to promote behaviors that prevent the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) through the learning of behavioral and communication skills. The educational program is comprised of four units: basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS/STDs, responsible behavior: delaying sexual intercourse, responsible behavior: protected sex, and care and support for people with AIDS. 53 student activities have been developed to support this curriculum; most are based on a participatory approach and present hypothetical situations of relevance to the lives of young people. Detailed information is provided for teachers on the rationale for this curriculum, seven appropriate teaching methods, creating a classroom atmosphere that promotes openness and acceptance, use of peer leaders, participation of parents and family members, test items for student evaluation, and typical questions about HIV/AIDS/STDs. In addition, the teacher's role in each of the student activities is described. Two companion volumes focus on guidelines for curriculum planners and the student activities.
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  3. 3
    106649

    School health education to prevent AIDS and STD. A resource package for curriculum planners. Students' activities.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNESCO

    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, WHO, 1994. [3], 79 p. (WHO/GPA/TCO/PRV/94.6b)

    This manual--part of a three-volume resource package designed by WHO and UNESCO to guide the development of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) education for students aged 12-16 years--presents 53 student activities for use in such a program. The goal of AIDS education is to promote behavior that prevents the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). The proposed program is comprised of four units: basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS/STDs, responsible behavior: delaying sexual intercourse, responsible behavior: protected sex, and care and support for those with AIDS. At completion, students should be able to differentiate between HIV, AIDS, and STDs; identify modes of HIV transmission; rank methods of HIV/STD prevention for effectiveness; identify sources of help in the community; discuss reasons for delaying sexual intercourse or, if already sexually active, using condoms; respond assertively to pressures to have sexual intercourse or unprotected sex; identify ways of showing compassion for those with HIV/AIDS; and care for people with AIDS in the family and community. The activity sheets include comic-style graphics that illustrate hypothetical situations and examples of pro-active AIDS-related behaviors; the emphasis is on participatory education, known to be most effective for the teaching of behavioral skills to young people. Two companion volumes focus on guidelines for curriculum planners and teachers.
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  4. 4
    106650

    School health education to prevent AIDS and STD. A resource package for curriculum planners. Handbook for curriculum planners.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNESCO

    Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, WHO, 1994. [3], 88 p. (WHO/GPA/TCO/PRV/94.6a)

    The effort to provide young people with school-based acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) education has been hindered in many cases by a lack of examples of curricula, learning materials, and classroom activities. To overcome this obstacle, WHO and UNESCO have prepared a resource package for the teaching of behavioral skills to reduce the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission among young people ages 12-16 years. This manual, intended for curriculum planners, outlines an educational model comprised of four units: basic knowledge of HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases, reasons for and communication skills germane to delaying sexual intercourse, information on condom use, and care and compassion for people with AIDS. Included are guidelines on the 10 steps in developing an AIDS education curriculum--situation assessment, defining the type of program, selecting objectives, the curriculum plan, planning for material production, developing student activities, developing the teachers' guide, validating the curriculum, teacher training, and program evaluation, sample materials for teacher training and introducing the curriculum to parents, and instruments for program evaluation. It is stressed that AIDS education is most effective when supported by community involvement and integrated into existing health, sex, or family life education programs. Two companion volumes focus on student activities and guidelines for teachers.
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  5. 5
    060169

    WHO / Unesco guide for school health education to prevent AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. Draft.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Programme on AIDS

    [Unpublished] 1989 Mar. v, 50, [15] p.

    Adolescents and young adults contribute a disproportionate share of cases of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and are an important target group for AIDS/STD preventive education. Information, values, and communication skills taught in the schools can have an important impact on the behavioral changes necessary to reduce the spread of AIDS. To encourage school systems' involvement, this guide shows how a culturally sensitive, locally relevant school-based educational effort can play a vital role in national AIDS prevention and control programs and outlines possible teaching approaches. School-based programs should seek to help students understand the modes of transmission of human immunodeficiency virus and recognize its symptoms, be able to make informed decisions about behaviors that place them at risk within the context of an overall understanding of human relationships, reject common myths about AIDS, and learn to recognize the rights to privacy and confidentiality of AIDS victims. It is essential that the AIDS educational program reflect the values and norms prevailing in the community. Teachers--and, where possible, parents and other community members--should be involved in planning the school-based curriculum. Since many students leave school before they become sexually active, AIDS education should begin at an early age. Participating teachers should receive training that enables them to feel comfortable addressing sexual issues and imparts both didactic and interactive learning strategies. Program evaluation should be conducted at regular intervals. Even if a formal school-based program is not designed, many opportunities exist within the educational system for informal references to AIDS.
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