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  1. 1
    314599

    Linking EDUCAIDS with other on-going initiatives. An overview of opportunities. An assessment of challenges.

    Visser-Valfrey M

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Education Sector, Division for the Coordination of UN Priorities in Education, Section on HIV and AIDS, 2006 Oct. 43 p. (ED-2006/WS/65; CLD-29608)

    This paper was commissioned by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to review the linkages and synergies between EDUCAIDS, the UNAIDS Global Initiative on Education and HIV & AIDS, and other initiatives in the field of HIV and AIDS. EDUCAIDS is one of UNESCO's three core Education for All (EFA) initiatives and focuses specifically on supporting national governments and their partners in developing comprehensive and scaled-up education sector responses to HIV and AIDS, with the dual objective of preventing the spread of HIV through education and of protecting education systems against the worst effects of the epidemic. This paper documents the similarities and differences between EDUCAIDS and selected initiatives, identifies current and potential links, and provides recommendations on how synergies and linkages can be strengthened. The analysis in this review was done on the basis of a document review and interviews with partners from the majority of the initiatives selected by UNESCO for this study. Five kinds of initiatives were reviewed. The first concerns programmes that have been put in place with a specific focus on HIV and AIDS. The second includes examples of initiatives with a broader focus (such as promoting sustainable development and enhancing school health) and which, through their activities, address a number of priority areas, including HIV & AIDS and education. The third is constituted by 'thematic initiatives' which address HIV and AIDS from a particular defined priority, for example by focusing on children. These initiatives include education as one of their strategies. The fourth kind of initiative concerns frameworks for operation at country level such as the 'Three Ones', the United Nations Development Assistance Framework (UNDAF) and the UN country teams on HIV and AIDS. Finally, the analysis also considers the synergies and differences between EDUCAIDS and the UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on Education. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    314594

    EDUCAIDS: towards a comprehensive education sector response. A framework for action.

    UNESCO; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Paris, France, UNESCO, Education Sector, Division for the Coordination of UN Priorities in Education, Section on HIV and AIDS, 2006 Sep. 27 p.

    Steady progress has been made in recent years in efforts to achieve Education for All (EFA), but about 100 million children are still not enrolled in primary school, 55 percent of them girls. HIV and AIDS are among the key factors exerting pressure on education systems and students in the regions with the greatest EFA challenges. Halting the spread of HIV is not only a Millennium Development Goal (MDG) in itself (Goal 6), but is a prerequisite for reaching the others including Goal 2 (achieving universal primary education) and Goal 3 (promoting gender equality and the empowerment of women). The AIDS epidemic is increasingly recognised to be one of the most serious threats to global stability and progress. Adult HIV prevalence has reached 40 percent in parts of Southern Africa, and the virus is spreading rapidly in a number of regions, from West and Central Africa to Eastern Europe, from Asia (notably China and India) to Latin America and the Caribbean. The impact of AIDS is also magnified because the disease primarily strikes adults, particularly young adults, who drive economic growth and raise the next generation. Close to 39 million people are estimated to be living with HIV, and the global AIDS epidemic is responsible for the deaths of 25 million, 2.8 million in the last year alone. HIV is unravelling hard-won development gains and is having a crippling effect on future prospects. Unless strong action is taken, particularly in massively expanded and intensified prevention efforts, the epidemic will continue to spread and threaten sustainable development, including progress towards achieving EFA. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    139162

    Latin America looks to adolescent needs.

    JOICFP NEWS. 1999 Jan; (295):2.

    64 representatives of UNFPA, Pathfinder, and the Johns Hopkins University, together with high-level representatives of Ministries of Health and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from the Bahamas, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Peru attended a conference on advocating sexuality education in school programs in the region. The conference, held October 22-26, 1998, was organized by JOICFP and the Mexican Foundation for Family Planning (MEXFAM) in collaboration with UNFPA and IPPF. Conference participants exchanged experiences upon sexuality education in school programs through group discussions and panel and country presentations. One goal of the conference was to strengthen the links between the various Ministries of Education and NGOs in the field of human sexuality. Recommendations for promoting adolescent reproductive health from Latin America and the Caribbean Region to ICPD+5 were made by 3 work groups and accepted by all participants as the outcome of the conference. Steps are currently being taken to develop and implement school curricula designed to raise the levels of awareness among youths of the important relationship between population and sustainable growth, as well as health issues and sexual equality.
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  4. 4
    102413

    Immediate and growing needs for help to a fragile new democracy: health in the Russian Federation with emphasis on children and women. Report of a UNICEF / WHO collaborative mission with the participation of UNFPA, UNDP, and WFP, 17 February - 2 March 1992.

    UNICEF; World Health Organization [WHO]

    [Unpublished] 1992 Mar 17. [2], 45, [19] p.

    From February 17 to March 2, 1992, the World Health Organization and UNICEF conducted a fact-finding mission to the Russian Federation to assess the health of the population, particularly of women and children. These international agencies found a unique situation in which economic adjustment to a market economy has created shortages in this developed nation similar to those encountered in developing countries. After an introductory section, the second section of this report provides background information on the Russian Federation, its economic situation, social protection mechanisms, and social statistics. Section 3 provides an assessment of the state of the health services, immunization programs, pharmaceuticals and equipment, nutrition, and the food situation. The next section discusses the organization of the public school system which may be used to provide nutritional supplements and health education. The rapid decline in environmental quality is then discussed, and examples are provided of some of the effects of this deterioration. The sixth section briefly mentions the three types of nongovernmental organizations available for partnerships and strategic alliances with international donors. Section 7 summarizes the recommendations of the mission. Six areas of assistance (each with several related recommendations) were identified: 1) to support those activities which will allow economic transition to be sensitive to the needs of vulnerable groups and social issues; 2) to provide emergency supplies to the health system through international channels and to foster the rapid rehabilitation of selected national production and distribution systems; 3) to provide technical assistance for the restructuring of the health system; 4) to establish monitoring systems to identify and protect vulnerable groups; 5) to engender support for donor coordination and the facilitation of international assistance; and 6) to support nongovernmental organizations and private partnerships as they attempt to strengthen social safety nets. A basic budget (which totals US $164 million and is separated into urgent and priority needs) is provided. Annexed information includes the construction and utilization of a food basket to monitor food prices, data on breastfeeding, and the highest priority needs for vaccines, drugs, and supplies.
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