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Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    372995

    Argentina: women weaving equitable gender relations.

    Stubbs J

    [Washington, D.C.], World Bank, 2008 Jan. 4 p. (en breve No. 114)

    In 2001, after a long period of recession, Argentina faced the greatest economic, political and institutional crisis in its history. Unemployment reached levels nearing 18% and the poverty rate reached a peak of 58% in 2002, increasing twofold the number of people living below the poverty line and impacting –in a disproportionate manner- the most vulnerable and poverty stricken families. The crisis also had a tremendous impact on Argentina’s middle-class. Increased unemployment and the freezing of wages and bank deposits forced many families to face poverty for the first time, and to seek new survival strategies. The crisis caused the rupture of traditional roles within the household, forcing many women into the workforce, many young people to leave school in search of a job, and many tradtional breadwinners to remain at home. In many cases, these changes challenged not just the economic viability of households but the role of families. Recognizing the potential impact of the situation, the Government of Argentina approached the World Bank for a small loan ($5 million), aimed at promoting gender equity and the development of families through the Family Strengthening and Social Capital Promotion Project (PROFAM). (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    309731
    Peer Reviewed

    Responsive parenting: interventions and outcomes.

    Eshel N; Daelmans B; de Mello MC; Martines J

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2006 Dec; 84(12):992-999.

    In addition to food, sanitation and access to health facilities children require adequate care at home for survival and optimal development. Responsiveness, a mother's/caregiver's prompt, contingent and appropriate interaction with the child, is a vital parenting tool with wide-ranging benefits for the child, from better cognitive and psychosocial development to protection from disease and mortality. We examined two facets of responsive parenting -- its role in child health and development and the effectiveness of interventions to enhance it -- by conducting a systematic review of literature from both developed and developing countries. Our results revealed that interventions are effective in enhancing maternal responsiveness, resulting in better child health and development, especially for the neediest populations. Since these interventions were feasible even in poor settings, they have great potential in helping us achieve the Millennium Development Goals. We suggest that responsiveness interventions be integrated into child survival strategies. (author's)
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  3. 3
    296569

    In Africa, hope and difficulties; training nurses in Angola and teaching young men responsible parenthood in Seychelles.

    UN Chronicle. 1987 Nov; 24(4):[3] p..

    Angola trained nurses to provide family planning services. Seychelles started a drive to educate young working people, particularly men, in responsible parenthood. Zimbabwe received a great quantity of contraceptives. All of this was accomplished in 1986 in sub-Saharan Africa with UNFPA help. Computer breakdowns slow work, but not all programmes worked equally well. Repeated computer breakdowns slowed down the Guinea census and the maternal and child health care project in Gabon was delayed by lack of equipment, staff and funds, according to UNFPA's latest annual report. Special projects for women in the region did not advance as rapidly as hoped. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    183418

    Child support as a strategic interest: la Asociación de Madres Demandantes of El Salvador. [La cuota alimenticia como interés estratégico: Asociación de Madres Demandantes de El Salvador]

    Ready K

    Gender and Development. 2003 Jul; 11(2):60-69.

    Among certain social sectors in El Salvador, couples have not necessarily engaged informal marriages. But with the economic and political crisis of the 1980s, many poor Salvador women were left with the sole financial responsibility for their children. With the 'modernisation' of the state in the post-war period, more of those women began to seek the assistance of the state in securing child support. This paper looks at the process that women had to go through to access that support and explores how Mujeres pot La Dignidad y La Vida (Women for Dignity and Life), afeminist organisation created out of the Salvadoran civil war, mobilised women to challenge institutionalised gender roles reflected in that process. The conflicts that arose within the new organisation they formed, the Asociacion de Madres Demandantes (Association of Mothers Seeking Child Support), highlight thedifferent interests of the women being organised and those organising them. These conflicts were intensified by the policies of donor organisations that supported the work of the Association. (author's)
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